Mahayana/Vajrayana Links and Resources

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Re: Pure Land Resources

Postby Admin_PC » Fri Jul 31, 2015 12:22 pm

Serenity509 wrote:This is the first time I've read a step by step explanation of how Pure Land Buddhism originated:

Have you read this one yet?
The Indian Roots of Pure Land Buddhism: Insights from the Oldest Chinese Versions of the Larger Sukhavativyuha by Jan Nattier
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Re: Pure Land Resources

Postby Serenity509 » Sun Aug 02, 2015 1:05 am

Thank you for sharing the article. This is my favorite part of it:

Based on the materials reviewed above, it is now clear that there is no
need to appeal to “foreign influences” or “non-Buddhist borrowings” to
explain the rise of devotion to Amitåbha in India. On the contrary, we can
see the emergence of his cult as the result of an ongoing process of
reflection—heavily informed, to be sure, by an ongoing series of visions
reported by certain religious virtuosi—taking place within the Buddhist
community itself.
http://www3.nccu.edu.tw/~ckeng/doc/Nattier_PureLand.pdf


By tracking its historical development, we can hopefully see that Pure Land isn't a deviation from or aberration of Buddhism. Pure Land is Buddhism. It is not a separate sect or school of Buddhism, though there are sects and schools that practice Pure Land practice. From an honest historical perspective, Pure Land Buddhism is inseparable from Buddhism itself.

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Re: Pure Land Resources

Postby Serenity509 » Sun Aug 02, 2015 10:57 am

We must not forget that ancient India was an oral culture, and important religious texts such as the Rigveda were passed down for hundreds of years before taking a written form.

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Re: Tendai & TienTai Resources

Postby Seishin » Wed Sep 16, 2015 2:17 pm

The main Tendai Shu website have updated their page and added some youtube videos (sound only)

Shomyo: http://www.tendai.or.jp/shoumyou/
Daily service: http://www.tendai.or.jp/danshinto/

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Re: Tendai & TienTai Resources

Postby DGA » Wed Sep 16, 2015 2:21 pm

Seishin wrote:The main Tendai Shu website have updated their page and added some youtube videos (sound only)

Shomyo: http://www.tendai.or.jp/shoumyou/
Daily service: http://www.tendai.or.jp/danshinto/

In gassho,
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Let's see if I get any work done today ...

Thanks for these links, Seishin.
DGA's dissertation, a cultural history of mindfulness, here:
https://www.academia.edu/25482900/WHAT_ ... _OF_STRESS

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Re: Tendai & TienTai Resources

Postby Seishin » Wed Sep 16, 2015 3:44 pm

I have more up my sleeve ;-)

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Re: Pure Land Resources

Postby Monlam Tharchin » Mon Sep 28, 2015 1:06 am

Here's a website replete with information and teachings in French: http://www.amitabha-terre-pure.net/
(Voici un site rempli d'informations et d'enseignements en français)
On hiatus from Dharma Wheel since 9/30/16.

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Re: Pure Land Resources

Postby Admin_PC » Mon Sep 28, 2015 2:32 am

Rev Kosen Ishikawa's been doing a great job of livestreaming Jodo Shu Dharma Services on youtube on Sundays at 4:30pm EST.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvYHJm ... uw1XOF79Zw
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Re: Pure Land Resources

Postby Monlam Tharchin » Thu Oct 01, 2015 4:42 pm

Good news regarding the Amitabha Terre Pure site. I sent them an offer to translate articles into English, and they've agreed to post whatever I can get done. I've begun work on the introductory pages. Translating is slow work, but I'll update here again when there's enough material in English to warrant a post.
On hiatus from Dharma Wheel since 9/30/16.

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Re: Pure Land Resources

Postby Admin_PC » Tue Nov 10, 2015 10:28 pm

janpeterotto wrote:Hi all friends in the dharma -- in my country, Sweden, few know about the Pure Land. But here is a valuable resource for those who happen to have swedish as their native language, or know it anyway:

http://www.harnostudier.com/tan.html

It is a translation of Tannisho by Yuien-bo, a diciple of Shinran Shonin.

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Jan Peter
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Gelug Resources

Postby Admin_PC » Wed Dec 16, 2015 4:12 pm

This is a thread for resources on the Gelug school of Tibetan Buddhism.

http://fpmt.org/
http://www.lamayeshe.com/
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Re: Pure Land Resources

Postby Admin_PC » Thu Dec 17, 2015 5:38 pm

Got some additional resources to add, but want to address the following book on the first post:

Visions of Sukhavati: Shan-Tao's Commentary on the Kuan Wu-Liang Shou-Fo Ching
- This book is nothing but a harsh polemic against Japanese schools of Pure Land. It does not, in fact, provide Shan-Tao's Commentary in the section of the book that purports to have it. Instead, it's just a rant, often referencing the works from Taoism, Confucianism, and non-Pure Land sutras in refuting interpretations by the Japanese Pure Land schools. An academic critique of this work is available here:
Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies • Volume 22 • Number 1 • 1999 • Shandao and Honen. Apropos of Julian F. Pas's book Visions of Sukhavati • by JEROME DUCOR

Now to actual resources...

Shan-Tao's Kannenbomon -THE METHOD OF CONTEMPLATION ON AMIDA
(The next 3 links are the same thing in prettier format)
Shan-tao's Shan-tao's Exposition of the Exposition of the Method of Contemplation on Amida Buddha, Part 1
Shan-tao's Shan-tao's Exposition of the Exposition of the Method of Contemplation on Amida Buddha, Part 2
Shan-tao's Shan-tao's Exposition of the Exposition of the Method of Contemplation on Amida Buddha, Part 3

Shan-Tao's Ojoraisan - LITURGY FOR BIRTH

Some relevant sutra translations from Rulu:
Buddha Pronounces the Mahāyāna Sūtra of the Dhāraṇī of Infinite-Life Resolute Radiance King Tathāgata
佛說大乘聖無量壽決定光明王如來陀羅尼經 (T19n0937)
Mahāyāna Sūtra of the Illuminating Everywhere Radiance-Store Wordless Dharma Door
大乘遍照光明藏無字法門經 (T17n0830)
Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of the Inconceivable State of Tathāgatas
大方廣如來不思議境界經 (T10n0301)
Sūtra of the Prophecy Bestowed upon Avalokiteśvara Bodhisattva
觀世音菩薩授記經 (T12n0371)
Great Might Arrived Bodhisattva’s Thinking-of-Buddhas as the Perfect Passage
大勢至菩薩念佛圓通章 (T19n0945)
Buddha Pronounces the Sūtra of the Total Annihilation of the Dharma
佛說法滅盡經 (T12n0396)
Sūtra of Mahā-Prajñā-Pāramitā Pronounced by Mañjuśrī Bodhisattva (in 2 fascicles)
文殊師利所說摩訶般若波羅蜜經 (T08n0232)
Mahāyāna Sūtra of Consciousness Revealed (in 2 fascicles)
大乘顯識經 (T12n0347)
Sūtra of Immeasurable Meaning
無量義經 (T09n0276)
Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of Buddha Adornment, fascicle 40
大方廣佛華嚴經: 入不思議解脫境界普賢行願品卷四十 (T10n0293)
Buddha Pronounces the Sūtra of the Pratyutpanna Buddha Sammukhāvasthita Samādhi
佛說般舟三昧經 (T13n0417)
Buddha Pronounces the Sūtra of Amitābha Buddha
佛說阿彌陀經 (T12n0366)
Buddha Pronounces the Sūtra of Visualization of Amitāyus Buddha
佛說觀無量壽佛經 (T12n0365)
Buddha Pronounces the Sūtra of Amitāyus Buddha (in 2 fascicles)
佛說無量壽經 (T12n0360)
Upadeśa on the Sūtra of Amitāyus Buddha
無量壽經優波提舍 (T26n1524)
Sūtra of the Path of the Ten Good Karmas
十善業道經 (T15n0600)
Sūtra of Accepting the Ten Good Karmas as Precepts
受十善戒經 (T24n1486)
Buddha Pronounces the Repentance Sūtra in Response to Śāriputra
佛說舍利弗悔過經 (T24n1492)
Sūtra of the Upāsaka Precepts (in 7 fascicles)
優婆塞戒經 (T24n1488)
Sūtra of the Garland of a Bodhisattva’s Primary Karmas (in 2 fascicles)
菩薩瓔珞本業經 (T24n1485)
Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of Buddha Adornment, fascicles 34–39
大方廣佛華嚴經: 十地品第二十六 (T10n0279)
Sūtra of the Profound Secret Unraveled, fascicle 4
解深密經卷第四 (T16n0676)
Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of Buddha Adornment, fascicles 40–43
大方廣佛華嚴經: 十定品第二十七 (T10n0279)
Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of Buddha Adornment, fascicle 44
大方廣佛華嚴經: 十通品第二十八 十忍品第二十九 (T10n0279)
Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of Buddha Adornment, fascicle 45
大方廣佛華嚴經: 阿僧祇品第三十 壽量品第三十一 諸菩薩住處品第三十二 (T10n0279)
Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of Buddha Adornment, fascicles 46–47
大方廣佛華嚴經: 佛不思議法品第三十三 (T10n0279)
Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of Buddha Adornment, fascicle 48
大方廣佛華嚴經: 如來十身相海品第三十四 如來隨好光明功德品第三十五 (T10n0279)
Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of Buddha Adornment, fascicle 49
大方廣佛華嚴經: 普賢行品第三十六 (T10n0279)
Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of Buddha Adornment, fascicles 50–52
大方廣佛華嚴經: 如來出現品第三十七 (T10n0279)
Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of Buddha Adornment, fascicles 53–59
大方廣佛華嚴經: 離世間品第三十八 (T10n0279)
Buddha Pronounces the Sūtra of the Buddha Ground
佛說佛地經 (T16n0680)
Sūtra of Entering the States of All Buddhas Adorned with Wisdom
度一切諸佛境界智嚴經 (T12n0358)
Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of Entering a Tathāgata’s Inconceivable State of Wisdom
大方廣入如來智德不思議經 (T12n0304)
Sūtra of Achieving a Clear Understanding of the Mahāyāna (in 2 fascicles)
大乘同性經 (T16n0673)
Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of Perfect Enlightenment
大方廣圓覺修多羅了義經 (T17n0842)
Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of the Tathāgata Store
大方等如來藏經 (T16n0666)
Vaipulya Sūtra of Śrīmālā’s Lion’s Roar That Reveals the Great Skillful Means of the One Vehicle
勝鬘師子吼一乘大方便方廣經 (T12n0353)
Buddha Pronounces the Sūtra of the Unsurpassed Reliance (in 2 fascicles)
佛說無上依經 (T16n0669)
Sūtra of the Vajra Samādhi (in 2 fascicles)
金剛三昧經 (T09n0273)

(Reminder: Mahāvaipulya Sūtra of Buddha Adornment = The Avatamsaka Sutra)

A list of relevant suttas from the Pali canon:
SN 55.021
SN 55.022
AN 08.025
AN 11.012
AN 11.013
SN 55.024
AN 08.039
Heaven
AN 05.043
SN 03.019
AN 05.038
DN 31.0
MN 012
Iti 3.071
AN 04.123
AN 04.125
AN 04.126
AN 04.005
AN 04.055
AN 05.041
AN 05.034
AN 05.179
AN 05.176
AN 06.013
AN 06.016
AN 06.045
AN 06.097
AN 07.006
AN 07.015
Dhp verse 25
Dhp verse 25 commentary
MN 070
MN 002
AN 01.049
Words of Ajaan Dune Atulo
Buddhanussati
Suddhaavaasaa Pure Abodes
Nibbana or Non-return
Heaven - Loka - Rupa
Tisarana
AN 03.070
Buddho recitation
SN 11.003 - than
SN 02.009
Sutta Nipata 2.01
Ministering to sick & terminally ill
SN 11.003 - piya
SN 06.002
SN 10.008
SN 55.040
SN 55.001
SN 55.030
SN 55.054
SN 55.031
SN 55.032
SN 55.033
MN 014
AN 03.073
Buddhanussati Meditation Recollection
Buddhanussati - Pia
Recollection of Buddha, Dhamma, Sangha
Sutta Nipata 5.05
Sutta Nipata 5.07
Sutta Nipata 4.04
Sutta Nipata 4.10
Sutta Nipata 5.01
Sutta Nipata 1.06
SN 42.008
SN 42.006
SN 41.006
SN 41.005
Dhp verse 17
Milindapanha
Sutta Nipata 2.04
AN 02.031
AN 08.006
AN 09.036
SN 36.031
AN 11.002
MN 007
DN 11
DN 12
AN 10.176
AN 08.043
AN 08.046
SN 12.022
Protection hymns
AN 08.054

Some scholarly articles:
Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies • Volume 23 • Number 1 • 2000 • The Realm of Akṣobhya: A Missing Piece in the History of Pure Land Buddhism • by Jan Nattier
The Sym bolism o f Light and Pure Land Buddhist Soteriology by Paul O. Ingram
The Indian Roots of Pure Land Buddhism by Jan Nattier
Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies • Volume 10 • Number 2 • 1987 • The Inscription on the Kushan Image of Amitabha and the Character of the Early Mahayana in India • by Gregory Schopen
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Re: Pure Land Resources

Postby Admin_PC » Thu Dec 17, 2015 11:34 pm

Some more Shin resources:
http://shinranworks.com/ - The Collected Works of Shinran
http://shindharmanet.com/ - Alfred Bloom's website (has a class on Shin Buddhism)
http://www.euroshinshu.org/www12.canvas ... -index.htm - the Horai Association site, containing the works of Rev. Zuiken Inagaki
http://www.nembutsu.info/ - The Journal of Shin Buddhism
http://www.nembutsu.info/kyogyoshinsho/ - Professor Emeritus Hisao Inagaki's reflections on the Kyogyoshinsho
http://www.nembutsu.info/standard/ - Rev Ryosetsu Fujiwara's "A Standard of Shinshu Faith"
http://www.nembutsu.info/indshin/ - Professor Dennis Hirota's "The Independent Shin Buddhist"
http://trueshinbuddhism.blogspot.com/ - The True Shin Buddhism Group, regardless of their politics, they host a lot of great content (translations)
http://www.pitaka.ch/indxshin.htm - Pure Land Buddhism WWW Virtual Library
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Re: Mahayana/Vajrayana Links and Resources

Postby Admin_PC » Wed Dec 23, 2015 3:56 pm

References for teachings on Amitabha, Phowa practices, and the Bardo.

Jetsunma Ahkon Lhamo
Thrangu Rinpoche
Rigdzin Dharma Foundation
Jetsunma Ahkon Lhamo:
phpBB [video]

Khenpo Sherab Sangpo series on Bardo Teachings & Phowa:
phpBB [video]

Garchen Rinpoche series on Phowa Teachings:
phpBB [video]

Sogyal Rinpoche - The Essential Phowa: A Practice for the Dying:
phpBB [video]

Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche series on Bardo Teachings:
phpBB [video]

Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche long series (31 episodes) on Bardo Teachings:
phpBB [video]
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Re: Mahayana/Vajrayana Links and Resources

Postby Taco_Rice » Fri Feb 12, 2016 12:00 am

Peter Adamson's History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps podcast now has a series going on early Indian philosophy, including Buddhism: http://historyofphilosophy.net/india
When facing a single tree, if you look at a single one of its red leaves, you will not see all the others. When the eye is not set on any one leaf, and you face the tree with nothing at all in mind, any number of leaves are visible to the eye without limit. But if a single leaf holds the eye, it will be as if the remaining leaves were not there. One who has understood this is no different from Kannon with a thousand arms and a thousand eyes.
— Takuan Sōhō, the Unfettered Mind

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A helpful mapping

Postby Admin_PC » Tue Dec 06, 2016 5:31 pm

If anybody was curious how to put Pure Land into terms of "mainstream/general Buddhism".

The suttas to Mahanama.
Buddhanussati as practice:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

The sutta to Sarakaani.
Alcoholics can be Stream Enterers (and faith will keep you out of hell):
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .wlsh.html

The Mahaparinibbana sutta has tons of goodies:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .vaji.html
Part 1 verse 31 - Buddha talks about making offerings to devas and how it will bring good fortune. :jawdrop:
Part 4 verse 56 - Cunda is promised heavenly birth (and other things) for offering the last meal to the Tathagata, aludes to the fact that other meals offered are also meritorious.
Part 5 verse 22 - Dying on a pilgrimage (with a heart established in faith) to a Buddhist holy site leads to birth in heaven.
Part 5 verse 24-31 - Buddha talks about how the householders should venerate him (but the monks should focus on practice) and that if they do venerate him (at a stupa) and have faith, they will be reborn in heaven.


The original Milindipanha from Sanskrit (via Chinese):
http://media.wix.com/ugd/9904ee_5166980 ... f20cac.pdf
p285 #62 - Mindfulness of the Buddha leads to heaven
p297-298 #67 - giving flowers leads to heaven
p299-300 #68 - knowing about the precepts and still doing wrong leads to less bad karma than unknowingly doing wrong

The Pali Milindipanha:
http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/milinda.pdf
Chapter 25 talks about how venerating relics can lead one to heaven.
Chapter 71 talks about how giving leads to heaven.

-----------------

3 Marks of Existence:
1. Impermanence (Anicca) - Pure Land practice focuses on the fact that life is short and that this Saha world is unstable.
2. Suffering (Dukkha) - Pure Land practice focuses on the fact that the unstable nature of this Saha world leads to anguish.
3. Non-self (Anatman) - Pure Land doctrine teaches practitioners to recognize that they are foolish beings, riddled with afflictive/destructive emotions (kileshas), and ultimately unreliable.

3 Fold practice:
1. Ethics (Sila) - Pure Land teaches Buddhist ethics, but takes it one step further and emphasizes how as hard as we try, we can't follow them perfectly. This teaches the remorse for the unskillful nature of the practitioner that minimizes the negative karmic fruits of actions.
2. Mental training (Samadhi) - This is achieved through recitation of the Nembutsu.
3. Wisdom (Panna) - This is reserved as a fruit of the Pure Land practice: seeing the Buddha, learning from him, and knowing the minds of all Buddhas.

4 Noble Truths:
1. The Truth of Suffering (Dukkha) - Pure Land practice focuses on the fact that the unstable nature of this Saha world leads to anguish.
2. The Truth of Origin of Suffering (Samudaya) - Pure Land doctrine teaches practitioners to recognize their foolish nature, to realize how they are riddled with afflictive emotions (kileshas), and to understand that the cause is due to the 3 poisons of craving, aversion, and ignorance.
3. The Truth of the Cessation of Suffering (Nirodha) - Pure Land doctrine teaches that practitioners will escape suffering and lead others to escape suffering once they are born in the Pure Land, become bodhisattvas & Buddhas, and are free of the 3 poisons.
4. The Truth of the Path to the Cessation of Suffering (Magga) - Pure Land teaches that the path to escape suffering is (in this life) arrived at through the practice of the Nembutsu.

8 Fold Path:
1. Right Understanding(sammā diṭṭhi, S. samyag-dṛṣṭi) - Understanding that we are limited beings, that this world is temporary, that karmic actions have results, and understanding that the only way out is through the Dharma.
2. Right Intention (sammā saṅkappa, S. samyak-saṃkalpa) - The intention to escape suffering by going to the Pure Land, to become a Buddha (developing relative bodhicitta), and to continue the work by helping others escape suffering.
3. Right Speech (sammā vācā, S. samyag-vāc) - Recitation of the Nembutsu. Reciting the Name of the Buddha is considered the highest form of Right Speech.
4. Right Action (sammā kammanta, S. samyak-karmānta) - Recitation of the Nembutsu. Reciting the Name of the Buddha is considered the highest form of Right Action.
5. Right Livelihood (sammā ājīva, S. samyag-ājīva) - The Pure Land take on this is that our karma in the past has led to our current conditions and if we cannot avoid doing jobs that are in violation of Right Livelihood, at least understanding remorse for it and knowing that it is temporary for this lifetime.
6. Right Energy (sammā vāyāma, S. samyag-vyāyāma) - Pure Land practice is to be done with energy (viriya).
7. Right Mindfulness (sammā sati, S. samyak-smṛti) - Mindfulness of the Buddha (literal translation of Nembutsu) is considered the highest form of Right Mindfulness.
8. Right Unification (sammā samādhi, S. samyak-samādhi) - Pure Land aspires for Mindfulness of the Buddha Samadhi (Nembutsu Sanmai), the state at which one sees the Pure Land, sees the Buddha, and ultimately learns the mind of all Buddhas. Also can be achieved by the natural outpouring of compassion & skillful qualities once unshakable faith has been established.

The 37 limbs of Enlightenment:
The 37 limbs of Enlightenment are referenced explicitly in the Shorter Sukhavati Sutra.
- The Four Establishments of Mindfulness:
- 1. Mindfulness of the body (kāyānupassanā, S. kayānupasthāna) - Mindfulness of the body of the Buddha & the attributes of the Pure Land. In Pure Land vipassana = visualizing the Buddha. Pure Land also involves being mindful that this life & this body are temporary.
- 2. Mindfulness of feelings (vedanānupassanā, S. vedanānupasthāna) - Mindfulness of the great compassion of the Buddha (like a parent) & the qualities of the Pure Land. Pure Land also involves being mindful of the unskillful states of our mind, riddled with afflictive emotions (kileshas).
- 3. Mindfulness of mental states (cittānupassanā, S. cittanupasthāna) - Mindfulness of the wisdom of the Buddha & certain qualities of the Pure Land. Inherent in this is the mindfulness of being able to view the Pure Land and the Buddha. Pure Land also involves being mindful of the restless nature of our monkey minds while we recite.
- 4. Mindfulness of mental qualities (dhammānupassanā, S. dharmanupasthāna) - Mindfulness of the various qualities of the Buddha & the Pure Land, including wisdom & compassion. Pure Land also involves being mindful of the limited, worldly nature of many of our qualities.

- Four right exertions
- 1. Exertion for the preventing of unskillful states to arise - Achieved during Nembutsu (especially during Nembutsu Samadhi), but also the realization that we are unskillful in body, speech, and mind. Also can be achieved by the natural outpouring of compassion & skillful qualities once unshakable faith has been established.
- 2. Exertion for the abandoning of the already arisen unskillful states - Achieved during Nembutsu (especially during Nembutsu Samadhi), but also learning to lament that we are unskillful in body, speech, and mind. Also can be achieved by the natural outpouring of compassion & skillful qualities once unshakable faith has been established.
- 3. Exertion for the arising of skillful states - Achieved during Nembutsu (especially during Nembutsu Samadhi), but also learning that as limited, foolish beings, that we should feel gratitude of the compassion of the Buddha. Also can be achieved by the natural outpouring of compassion & skillful qualities once unshakable faith has been established.
- 4. Exertion for the sustaining and increasing of arisen skillful states - Achieved during Nembutsu (especially during Nembutsu Samadhi), but also through continuous Nembutsu throughout one's life. Also can be achieved by the natural outpouring of compassion & skillful qualities once unshakable faith has been established.

- Four bases of power
- 1. Will (chanda, S. chanda) - the single-minded desire to be born in the Pure Land.
- 2. Energy (viriya, S. virya) - reciting the Nembutsu energetically.
- 3. Consciousness (citta, S. citta) - aspiring for birth in the Pure Land to become a Buddha, developing bodhicitta.
- 4. Examination (vīmaṁsa or vīmaŋsā, S. mimāṃsā) - examination of our own limited qualities as foolish beings, as well as the qualities of the Buddha and the Pure Land.

- Five faculties
- 1. Conviction (saddhā, S. śraddā) - Faith in the 18th Vow for birth in the Pure Land and in the wisdom & compassion of the Buddhas.
- 2. Energy (viriya, s. virya) - Energetically reciting the Nembutsu
- 3. Mindfulness (sati, S. smṛti) - Mindfulness of the Buddha through Nembutsu
- 4. Unification (samādhi, S. samādhi) - Nembutsu Samadhi, seeing the Pure Land, seeing the Buddha, and gaining wisdom. Unshakable faith is also sometimes referred to as a form of samadhi.

- Five powers
- Culmination of the 5 faculties above

- Seven factors of Enlightenment
- 1. Mindfulness (sati, S. smṛti) - Mindfulness of the Buddha is considered the highest form of Mindfulness.
- 2. Investigation (dhamma vicaya, S. dharmapravicaya) - Reading & reciting the sutras & commentaries.
- 3. Energy (viriya, S. virya) - Energetically reciting the Nembutsu throughout one's life.
- 4. Joy (pīti, S. prīti) - One thought moment of joy at hearing about the vows of Amida and following the Pure Land path mentioned in the Larger Sutra. Achieved once one establishes unshakable faith.
- 5. Tranquillity (passaddhi, S. praśrabdhi) - Achieved temporarily through Nembutsu, established in one's life through unshakable faith (accompanied by gratitude), and culminated in the Pure Land when one becomes a Buddha/bodhisattva.
- 6. Unification (samadhi, S. samādhi) - Nembutsu Samadhi achieved through recitation of Nembutsu.
- 7. Equanimity (upekkhā, S. upekṣā) - Achieved temporarily through Nembutsu, established in one's life through unshakable faith (accompanied by gratitude), and culminated in the Pure Land when one becomes a Buddha/bodhisattva. Also achieved when one realizes one's foolish nature as a being bound by afflictions (kileshas), that one is no better than anyone else, and that through receiving the compassion of the Buddha - all sentient beings are deserving of such compassion.

- Noble 8 Fold Path
- Described above.

Meditation
1. Single pointed Concentration (Samatha) - Vasubandhu & ShanTao describe single-pointed concentration in Pure Land as the single-minded desire for birth in the Pure Land. In practice, this concentration can be achieved through constant and continuous recitation of the Nembutsu.
2. Insight Meditation (Vipassanā) - Vasubandhu defines insight meditation in Pure Land as visualization of the adornments of the Pure Land and of Amitabha Buddha.

Kasina Meditation
There are 10 basic visual objects of meditation:
1. earth (paṭhavī kasiṇa) - part of the visualization in the Shorter Sukhavati Sutra, the Larger Sukhavati Sutra, and the 3rd visualization in the Visualization sutra.
2. water (āpo kasiṇa) - part of the visualization in the Shorter Sukhavati Sutra, the Larger Sukhavati Sutra, and the 2nd & 5th visualizations in the Visualization sutra.
3. fire (tejo kasiṇa) - part of the 4th visualization in the Visualization sutra. Shows up in the 2nd fascicle of the Larger Sukhavati Sutra, regarding the 5 evils and 5 virtues.
4. air, wind (vāyo kasiṇa) - part of the visualization in the Shorter Sukhavati Sutra, the Larger Sukhavati Sutra, and the latter part of the 3rd visualization in the Visualization sutra.
5. blue, green (nīla kasiṇa) - part of the visualization in the Shorter Sukhavati Sutra (the flowers), the Larger Sukhavati Sutra, and the 2nd, 3rd, and 9th visualizations in the Visualization sutra.
6. yellow (pīta kasiṇa) - part of the visualization in the Shorter Sukhavati Sutra (the flowers), the Larger Sukhavati Sutra, and the 5th visualization in the Visualization sutra.
7. red (lohita kasiṇa) - part of the visualization in the Shorter Sukhavati Sutra (the flowers), the Larger Sukhavati Sutra, and the 4th, 10th, and 11th visualizations in the Visualization sutra.
8. white (odāta kasiṇa) - part of the visualization in the Shorter Sukhavati Sutra (the flowers), the Larger Sukhavati Sutra, and the 4th and 9th visualizations in the Visualization sutra.
9. enclosed space, hole, aperture (ākāsa kasiṇa) - part of the 1st visualization in the Visualization sutra.
10. consciousness (viññāṇa kasiṇa) or bright light (āloka kasiṇa) - 8th and 9th visualizations in the Visualization sutra. Bright light is in all 3 sutras.
月影の いたらぬ里は なけれども 眺むる人の 心にぞすむ
法然上人

DGA
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Re: A helpful mapping

Postby DGA » Tue Dec 06, 2016 5:40 pm

This is truly excellent. You have created a very useful resource here.

Would you please sticky this thread to the top of the Pure Land forum?
DGA's dissertation, a cultural history of mindfulness, here:
https://www.academia.edu/25482900/WHAT_ ... _OF_STRESS

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Re: A helpful mapping

Postby Admin_PC » Tue Dec 06, 2016 6:00 pm

Well if you insist. :tongue:
I just added the Kasina stuff at the end (though I might be able to do a better job of the mapping).
月影の いたらぬ里は なけれども 眺むる人の 心にぞすむ
法然上人

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Re: A helpful mapping

Postby Coëmgenu » Wed Dec 07, 2016 4:58 pm

Admin_PC wrote:The Mahaparinibbana sutta has tons of goodies:

[...]

Part 5 verse 24-31 - Buddha talks about how the householders should venerate him (but the monks should focus on practice) and that if they do venerate him (at a stupa) and have faith, they will be reborn in heaven.
I can't actually find where is specifies that householders have one set of behaviours and monks another:
24. Then the Venerable Ananda said: "How should we act, Lord, respecting the body of the Tathagata?"

"Do not hinder yourselves, Ananda, to honor the body of the Tathagata. Rather you should strive, Ananda, and be zealous on your own behalf,[46] for your own good. Unflinchingly, ardently, and resolutely you should apply yourselves to your own good. For there are, Ananda, wise nobles, wise brahmans, and wise householders who are devoted to the Tathagata, and it is they who will render the honor to the body of the Tathagata."

25. Then the Venerable Ananda said: "But how, Lord, should they act respecting the body of the Tathagata?"

"After the same manner, Ananda, as towards the body of a universal monarch."[47]

"But how, Lord, do they act respecting the body of a universal monarch?"

26. "The body of a universal monarch, Ananda, is first wrapped round with new linen, and then with teased cotton wool, and so it is done up to five hundred layers of linen and five hundred of cotton wool. When that is done, the body of the universal monarch is placed in an iron[48] oil vessel, which is enclosed in another iron vessel, a funeral pyre is built of all kinds of perfumed woods, and so the body of the universal monarch is burned; and at a crossroads a stupa is raised for the universal monarch. So it is done, Ananda, with the body of a universal monarch. And even, Ananda, as with the body of a universal monarch, so should it be done with the body of the Tathagata; and at a crossroads also a stupa should be raised for the Tathagata. And whosoever shall bring to that place garlands or incense or sandalpaste, or pay reverence, and whose mind becomes calm there — it will be to his well being and happiness for a long time.

27. "There are four persons, Ananda, who are worthy of a stupa. Who are those four? A Tathagata, an Arahant, a Fully Enlightened One is worthy of a stupa; so also is a Paccekabuddha,[49] and a disciple of a Tathagata, and a universal monarch.

28-31. "And why, Ananda, is a Tathagata, an Arahant, a Fully Enlightened One worthy of a stupa? Because, Ananda, at the thought: 'This is the stupa of that Blessed One, Arahant, Fully Enlightened One!' the hearts of many people will be calmed and made happy; and so calmed and with their minds established in faith therein, at the breaking up of the body, after death, they will be reborn in a realm of heavenly happiness. And so also at the thought: 'This is the stupa of that Paccekabuddha!' or 'This is the stupa of a disciple of that Tathagata, Arahant, Fully Enlightened One!' or 'This is the stupa of that righteous monarch who ruled according to Dhamma!' — the hearts of many people are calmed and made happy; and so calmed and with their minds established in faith therein, at the breaking up of the body, after death, they will be reborn in a realm of heavenly happiness. And it is because of this, Ananda, that these four persons are worthy of a stupa."
"My pure land is not destroyed,
yet the multitude sees it as consumed in fire,
with anxiety, fear, and other sufferings
filling it everywhere."
(Saddharmapuṇḍarīkasūtra XVI)

All these dharmāḥ are the status of dharma, the standing of dharma, the suchness of dharma; the dharma neither departs from things-as-they-are, nor differs from things-as-they-are; it is the truth, reality, without distortion.(SA 296, 因緣法)
揭諦揭諦,波羅揭諦,波羅僧揭諦,菩提薩婆訶(Prajñāpāramitāhṛdayasya Mantra)


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