Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Post sayings or stories you find interesting or useful.

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Wed Jan 02, 2013 5:23 pm

Dear Members,

This freezing after New Year's Day , I proudly present DEVADHAMMA-JĀTAKA ...about brothers'love...so
heartwarming/cute..I love it very much.

Meet Me Halfway : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apJ6JDURV68

*************

:heart: DEVADHAMMA-JĀTAKA : Prince Mahimsasa :heart:
[Translated By Robert Chalmers]

This story was told by the Blessed One while at Jetavana, about a wealthy Bhikkhu.

Once on a time Brahmadatta was reigning in Benares in Kasi. The Bodhisatta, having come to birth in those days as the king's son by the queen, was duly named Prince Mahimsasa. By the time he could run about, a second son was born to the king, and the name they gave this child was Prince Moon; but by the time he could run about, the Bodhisatta's mother died. Then the king took another queen, who was his joy and delight; and their love was crowned with the birth of yet another prince, whom they named Prince Sun. In his joy at the birth of the boy, the king promised to grant her any boon she might ask on the child's behalf. But the queen treasured up the promise to be fulfilled at her own good time hereafter. Later, when her son had grown up, she said to the king, "Sire, when my boy was born, you granted me a boon to ask for him. Let him be king."

"Nay," said the king; "two sons have I, radiant as flaming fires; I cannot give the kingdom to your son." But when he saw that, undaunted by this refusal, the queen kept plaguing him time after time, to grant her request, the king, fearing lest the woman should plot evil against his sons, sent for them and said, "My children, when Prince Sun was born, I granted a boon; and now his mother wants the kingdom for him. I have no wish to give him the kingdom; but women are naturally wicked, and she will be plotting evil against you. You had better retire to the forest, to return at my death to rule in the city which belongs by right to our house." So saying, with tears and lamentations, the king kissed his two sons on the head and sent them forth.

As the princes were leaving the palace after their adieux to their father, who should see them but Prince Sun himself, who was playing in the courtyard? And no sooner did he learn what was the matter then he made up his mind to go with his brothers. So he too went off in their company.

The three came to the region of the Himalayas; and here the Bodhisatta, who had turned aside from the road and was sitting at the foot of a tree, said to Prince Sun, "Run down to the pool yonder, Sun dear; drink and bathe there; and then bring us too some water back in a lotus-leaf."

(Now that pool had been delivered over to a certain water-sprite by Vessavana, who said to him, "With the exception of such as know what is truly god-like, all that go down into this pool are yours to devour. Over those that do not enter the waters, you have no power granted to you." And thenceforth the water-sprite used to ask all who went down into the pool what was truly godlike, devouring everyone who did not know.)

Now it was into this pool that Prince Sun went down, quite unsuspiciously, with the result that he was seized by the water-sprite, who said to him, "Do you know what is truly godlike?" "O yes," said he; "the sun and moon." "You don't know," said the monster, and hauling the prince down into the depths of the water, imprisoned him there in his own abode. Finding that his brother was a long time gone, the Bodhisatta sent Prince Moon. He too was seized by the water-sprite and asked whether he knew what was truly godlike. "Oh yes, I know," said he; "the four. quarters of heaven are." "You don't know," said the water-sprite as he hauled this second victim off to the same prison-house.

Finding that this second brother too tarried long, the Bodhisatta felt sure that something had happened to them. So away he went after them and tracked their footsteps down into the water. Realising at once that the pool must be the domain of a water-sprite, he girded on his sword, and took his bow in his hand, and waited. Now when the demon found that the Bodhisatta had no intention of entering the water, he assumed the shape of a forester, and in this guise addressed the Bodhisatta thus: "You're tired with your journey, mate; why don't you go in and have a bathe and a drink, and deck yourself with lotuses? You would travel on comfortably afterwards." Recognising him at once for a demon, the Bodhisatta said, "It is you who have seized my brothers." "Yes, it was," was the reply. "Why?" Because all who go down into this pool belong to me." "What, all?" "Not those who know what is truly godlike; all save these are mine." "And do you want to know the godlike?" "I do." "If this be so, I will tell you what is truly godlike." "Do so, and I will listen."

"I should like to begin," said the Bodhisatta, "but I am travel-stained with my journey." Then the water-sprite bathed the Bodhisatta, and gave him food to eat and water to drink, decked him with flowers, sprinkled him with scents, and laid out a couch for him in the midst of a gorgeous pavilion. Seating himself on this couch, and making the water-sprite sit at his feet, the Bodhisatta said, "Listen then and you shall hear what the truly godlike is." And he repeated this stanza:--

Those only 'godlike' call who shrink from sin,
The white-souled tranquil votaries of Good.

And when the demon heard this, he was pleased, and said to the Bodhisatta, "Man of wisdom, I am pleased with you, and give you up one of your brothers. Which shall I bring?" "The youngest." "Man of wisdom, though you know so well what the truly godlike is, you don't act on your knowledge." "How so?" "Why, you take the younger in preference to the elder, without regard to his seniority." "Demon, I not only know but practise the godlike. It was on this boy's account that we sought refuge in the forest; it was for him that his mother asked the kingdom from our father, and our father, refusing to fulfil her demand, consented to our flight to the refuge of the forest. With us came this boy, nor ever thought of turning back again. Not a soul would believe me if I were to give out that he had been devoured by a demon in the forest; and it is the fear of odium that impels me to demand him at your hands."

"Excellent! excellent! O man of wisdom," cried the demon in approval; "you not only know but practise the godlike." And in token of his pleasure and approval he brought forth the two brothers and gave them both to the Bodhisatta.

Then said the latter to the water-sprite, "Friend, it is in consequence of your own evil deeds in times past that you have now been born a demon subsisting on the flesh and blood of other living creatures; and in this present birth too you are continuing to do evil. This evil conduct will for ever bar you from escaping re-birth in hell and the other evil states. Wherefore, from this time forth renounce evil and live virtuously."

Having worked the demon's conversion, the Bodhisatta continued to dwell at that spot under his protection, until one day he read in the stars that his father was dead. Then taking the water-sprite with him, he returned to Benares and took possession of the kingdom, making Prince Moon his viceroy and Prince Sun his generalissimo. For the water-sprite he made a home in a pleasant spot and took measures to ensure his being provided with the choicest garlands, flowers, and food. He himself ruled in righteousness until he passed away to fare according to his deeds.
------

The Buddha identified the Birth, by saying, "The well-to-do bhikkhu was the water-demon of those days; Ananda was Prince Sun, Sariputta Prince Moon, and he himself the eldest brother, Prince Mahimsasa."

*********May each day of this year 2013, be a good day to you all :heart:

:heart: Love Buddha's dhamma :heart:
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Mon Jan 07, 2013 5:21 pm

Dear Members,

This manic Monday I would like to present a great story of King Mahakappina and a song to you all.

Crying In The Chapel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5IExOQ4kDQ

****************
:heart: Mahakappina : The Great King :heart:
[TRANSLATED BY DAW MYA TIN]

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (79) of this book, with reference to Thera Mahakappina.

Mahakappina was king of Kukkutavati. He had a queen named Anoja; he also had one thousand ministers to help him rule the country. One day, the king accompanied by those one thousand ministers, was out in the park. There, they met some merchants from Savatthi. On learning about the Buddha, the Dhamma, and the Samgha from these merchants the king and his ministers immediately set out for Savatthi.

On that day, when the Buddha surveyed the world with his supernormal power, he saw in his vision, Mahakappina and his ministers coming towards Savatthi. He also knew that they were due for arahatship. The Buddha went to a place one hundred and twenty yojanas away from Savatthi to meet them. There, he waited for them under a banyan tree on the bank of the river Candabhaga. King Mahakappina and his ministers came to the place where the Buddha was waiting for them. When they saw the Buddha, with six-coloured rays radiating from his body, they approached the Buddha and paid homage to him. The Buddha then delivered a discourse to them. After listening to the discourse the king and all his ministers attained Sotapatti Fruition, and they asked the Buddha to permit them to join the Order. The Buddha, reflecting on their past and finding that they had made offerings of yellow robes in a past existence, said to them, "Ehi bhikkhu", and they all became bhikkhus.

Meanwhile, Queen Anoja, learning about the king's departure for Savatthi, sent for the wives of the one thousand ministers, and together with them followed the king's trail. They too came to the place where the Buddha was and seeing the Buddha with a halo of six colours, paid homage to him. All this time, the Buddha by exercising his supernormal power had made the king and his ministers invisible so that their wives did not see them. 'The queen therefore enquired where the king and his ministers were. The Buddha told the queen and her party to wait for a while and that the king would soon come with his ministers. The Buddha then delivered another discourse; at the end of this discourse the king and his ministers attained arahatship; the queen and the wives of the ministers attained Sotapatti Fruition. At that instant, the queen and her party saw the newly admitted bhikkhus and recognized them as their former husbands.

The ladies also asked permission from the Buddha to enter the Order of Bhikkhunis; so they were directed to go ahead to Savatthi. There they entered the Order and very soon they also attained arahatship. The Buddha then returned to the Jetavana monastery accompanied by one thousand bhikkhus.

At the Jetavana monastery, Thera Mahakappina while resting during the night or during the day would often say, "Oh, what happiness!" (Aho Sukham). The bhikkhus, hearing him saying this so many times a day told the Buddha about it. To them the Buddha replied, "My son Kappina having had the taste of the Dhamma lives happily with a serene mind; he is saying these words of exultation repeatedly with reference to Nibbana."

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 79. He who drinks in the Dhamma lives happily with a serene mind; the wise man always takes delight in the Dhamma (Bodhipakkhiya Dhamma) expounded by the Noble Ones (ariyas).

*********
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Thu Jan 10, 2013 3:26 pm

Dear Members,

When I was 14, my brother's friend gave me a free ticket to see the movie " Angulimala", Gala Premiere at his dad's theatre. I loved the movie pretty much. Today I proudly present the story of Angulimala in one of his past existences...and HE WAS THE BODHISATTA'S UNCLE !!!

She's A Maneater : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HZzeXkr2cWg
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:heart: JAYADDISA-JĀTAKA: The Man-Eater :heart:
Translated from the Pali by H.T. Francis, [1905], at sacred-texts.com

This story the Master told of a Brother who supported his mother. the Master said, “Sages of old gave up the white umbrella with its golden wreath to support their parents,” and with these words he told a story of the past.

Once upon a time there lived a king in a city of the Northern Pancala, in the kingdom of Kampilla. His queen consort conceived and bare a son. In a former existence her rival in the harem, being in a rage, said, “Some day I shall be able to devour your offspring,” and putting up a prayer to this effect she was turned into an ogress. Then she found her opportunity and, seizing the child before the very eyes of the queen and crunching and devouring it as if it were a piece of raw flesh, she made off. A second time she did exactly the same thing, but on the third occasion, when the queen had entered into her lying-in chamber, a guard surrounded the palace and kept a strict watch. On the day when she brought forth, the ogress again appeared and seized the child. The queen uttered a loud cry of “Ogress,” and armed soldiers, running up when the alarm was given by the queen, went in pursuit of the ogress. Not having time to devour the child, she fled and hid herself in a sewer. The child, taking the ogress for its mother, put its lips to her breast, and she conceived a mother’s love for the infant, and repairing to a cemetery she hid him in a rock-cave and watched over him.

And as he gradually grew up, she brought and gave him human flesh, and they both lived on this food. The boy did not know that he was a human being; but, though he believed himself to be the son of the ogress, he could not get rid of or conceal his bodily form. So to bring this about she gave him a certain root. And by virtue of this root he concealed his form and continued to live on human flesh. One day the ogress went away to do service to the great king Vessavana(one of the Catummaharajano and rules over the Yakkhas), and died then and there. But the queen for the fourth time gave birth to a boy, and because the ogress was now dead, he was safe, and from the fact of his being born victorious over his enemy the ogress, he was called Jayaddisa (prince Victor).

As soon as the prince was grown up and thoroughly educated in all learning, he assumed the sovereignty by raising the umbrella, and ruled over the kingdom. At that time his queen consort gave birth to the Bodhisatta, and they called him prince Alinasattu. When he grew up and was fully instructed in all learning, he became viceroy. But the son of the ogress by carelessly destroying the root was unable to hide himself, living in the cemetery he devoured human flesh in a visible form. People on seeing him were alarmed, and came and complained to the king. The king gave orders for his seizure. An armed force was stationed all round the city. The son of the ogress, with the fear of death upon him, escaping from thence, hid himself in the forest and no longer approached the haunts of men. And he took up his abode at the foot of a banyan tree near a high-road through the forest, and as people travelled by it, he would seize them one by one, and entering the wood killed and ate them.

On the seventh day after this, king Jayaddisa ordered a hunt, but just as he was about to start out, Nanda, a brahmin from Takkasila, brought him four verses worth one hundred each. Jayaddisa ordered a dwelling to be made for him and declared that he on whose side the deer escaped should pay for the verses. An antelope made straight for the king and escaped. The king pursued and killed it, but while on his way back with the carcase he came to the ogre's dwelling place and was promptly claimed as his prey. Remembering his promise to pay Nanda, Jayaddisa persuaded the ogre to let him go on condition that he would return when he had paid for the verses.

The ogre let the king go. And he, being allowed to depart, taking note of certain landmarks by the way, he returned to his army, and with this escort made his entrance into the city. Then he summoned the brahmin Nanda, seated him on a splendid throne, and, after hearing his verses, presented him with four thousand pieces of money. And he made the brahmin mount a chariot and sent him away, bidding his servants conduct him straight to Takkasila.

On the next day, being anxious to return, the king called his son, and told him about the ogre and his promise. Alinasattu offered to go in his fathers place and this was allowed. And the prince, following his father’s directions, set out on the road to the dwelling of the ogre.He won over the ogre by his fearlessness, and having made the ogre humble, he taught him the five moral laws. Suspecting that the ogre was his father's elder brother,who was abducted by the ogress long time ago, proved the relationship with the help of an ascetic gifted with supernatural vision. Prince Alinasattu then asked the ogre to return to the palace with him, but he denied, said that he wanted to become an ascetic. So he was ordained to the religious life by the ascetic. Then the prince saluted him and returned to the city.

The king heard that the prince had returned and set out to meet him, and the prince, escorted by a great multitude, came and saluted the king. And he asked him, saying, “Dear son, how have you escaped from so terrible an ogre?” And he said, “Dear father, he is no ogre; he is your elder brother and my uncle.” And he told him all about it and said, “You must go and see my uncle.” The king at once set out with a great retinue to visit the ascetics. The chief ascetic told them the whole story in full; how the child had been carried off by an ogress, and how instead of eating him she had brought him up as an ogre, and how they were related one to another. The king said, “Come, brother, do you reign as king.” “No, thank you, Sire,” he replied. “Then come and take up your abode in our park and I will supply you with the four requisites.” He refused to come. Then the king made a settlement on a certain mountain, not far from their hermitage, and, forming a lake, prepared cultivated fields and, bringing a thousand families with much treasure, he founded a big village and instituted a system of almsgiving for the ascetics. This village grew into the town Cullakammasadamma.
Note**: The region where the ogre was tamed by the Great Being Sutasoma was to be known as the town of Mahakammasadamma.--------

The Master, having ended his lesson, revealed the Truths and identified the Birth "At that time the father and mother(of the bhikkhu who supported his mother) were members of the king’s household, the chief ascetic was Sariputta, the man-eater was Angulimala and prince Alinasattu was myself.”
At the conclusion of the Truths the elder who supported his mother was established in the fruition of the First Path.

********************
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Sun Jan 13, 2013 3:19 pm

Alambusa Jataka : The Temptation of Isisanga

Dear Members,

I love this cute Jataka very much. This happy Sunday is so right for me to introduce this beautiful story to you all.

Addicted To Love : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcATvu5f9vE

***************
The Temptation of Isisanga
[Translated from the Pali by Dr.C.B.Varma, D Litt]

Once upon a time there lived a young man in an erudite family. He was well-versed in various arts and crafts. Yet, he did not lead a life of a house-holder as he preferred to become an ascetic. So, he built a hermitage on the bank of the river Ganga in the Himalaya and lived there.

One day, a doe drank water in the place where the ascetic had just taken bath. The water there was mingled with the ascetic’s semen. So, no sooner than she drank the water she conceived the ascetic’s baby. The ascetic soon noticed the changes taking place in the doe’s body, and knew what had happened to her. So, he took care of her. In course of time, the doe delivered a male baby, who was called Isisanga.

The sage brought him up with fatherly affection and when the boy was young enough to learn he taught him spiritual practices, too. The boy was very receptive. Soon he proved his excellence in meditation and other spiritual pursuits.

Realising his abilities and potentialities the sage cautioned him by saying,

"In this Himalayan region the women are as fair as flowers

But they may be devastating if you fall in their powers. "

After imparting these instructions the ascetic died.

By and by, Isisanga became an ardent ascetic and perfected the most arduous penance and virtuousity, which shook the Sakka’s abode. Shaken and frightened by the practices of the young lad, Sakka sent the most gorgeous and voluptuous heavenly nymph to the young ascetic to entice him. Her name was Alambusa. Though a subject of the heavenly king, she pleaded exemption from carrying out such an order as she considered it to be a heinous act. Yet, insisted by her lord, she descended the earth with all her beauty and exuberance to charm and seduce Isisanga. She made a sudden appearance before him when he was walking to the river to have his holy bath. Dazzled at such a heavenly beauty and allured by her elegance he forgot everything but to remember to sing every word of praise for her voluptuous looks right from her hair to her feet. Knowing that she was just about to succeed in her mission, she did not waste a single moment and invited him to follow her by her amorous glance. She then entered his cottage. The young ascetic, unmindful of all his vows, tailed her inside and plunged into her embrace.

When the ascetic could arouse from her embrace, three years had elapsed; and all his spiritual achievements had vanished. Thus, realising his irreparable losses he started wailing. The kind nymph then revealed her mission with an apology and shared his mourning. The ascetic wore no malice against her and pardoned her.

After the conclusion of her mission, she boarded the golden chariot and flew back to her heavenly abode. When congratulated and commended by Sakka for having accomplished her task so meticulously, she was not pleased to the surprise of the lord of the devas. Further, when Sakka offered her to ask for any boon she said,

"O Lord of Heaven! If thou desire any boon to bestow

Then never ask me to make any saint violate his vow."

Note: The old ascetic is identified with the Bodhisatta.
*************** :anjali:

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:44 pm

The Robber And A Deadly Courtesan

Dear Members,

The Buddha told this story(Jataka) to a lovesick bhikkhu who wanted to disrobe to go back to his wife.

Devil In Disguise : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=judcSt6HBvo

***********
:jumping: Kanavera Jataka : The Robber And A Deadly Courtesan :jumping:
[Edited from The Dhamma Encyclopedia]

Once upon a time when Brahadatta was reigning in Benares, the Bodhisatta was born as a famous/handsome robber who gained his living by robbery. One day he broke into a rich merchant’s house and carried off much treasure. The townsfolk came to complain to the king. The king ordered the governor of the city to seize him. So in the night the governor posted men here and there on detachments, and having effected his capture with the money upon him, he reported it to the king. The king bade the governor cut off his head. Then the governor had his arms tightly bound behind him, and having tied a wreath of red kanavera flowers about his neck and sprinkled brickdust on his head, had him scourged with whips in every square, and then led to the place of execution to the music of the harsh-sounding drum. Men said, “This rapacious robber who loots our city is taken,” and the whole city was greatly moved.

At this time there lived in Benares a courtesan named Sama, whose price was a thousand pieces of money. She was a favorite of the king’s. And as she stood at a window on the upper floor of her palace, she saw this robber being led along. He was handsome and stood forth above all men, glorious and god-like in appearance. And when she saw him being thus led past, she fell in love with him and thought within herself, “By what device can I secure this man for my husband?” “This is the way,” she said, and sent by the hand of one of her female attendants a thousand pieces of money to the governor, and “Tell him,” She said, “this robber is Sama’s brother, and he has no other refuge except in Sama. And ask him to accept the money and let his prisoner escape.” The handmaid did as she was told. But the governor said, “This is a notorious robber, I cannot let him go free after this sort. But if I could find another man as a substitute, I could put the robber in a covered carriage and send him to you.” The slave came and reported this to her mistress.

Now at this time a certain rich young merchant, who was enamoured of Sama, presented her every day with a thousand pieces of money. And that very day at sunset her lover came as usual to her house with the money. And Sama took the money and placed it in her lap and sat weeping. And when she was asked what was the cause of her sorrow, she said, “My lord, this robber is my brother, though he never came to see me, because people say I follow a vile trade: when I sent a message to the governor he sent word that if he were to receive a thousand pieces of money, he would let his prisoner go free. And now I cannot find any one to go and take this money to the governor.” The youth for the love he bare her said, “I will go.” “Go, then,” said she, “and take with you the money you brought me.” So he took it and went to the house of the governor. The governor hid the young merchant in a secret place, and had the robber conveyed in a close carriage to Sama. Then he thought, “This robber is well known in the country. It must be quite dark first. And then, when all men are retired to rest, I will have the man executed.” And so making some excuse for delaying it awhile, when people had retired to rest, he sent the young merchant with a large escort to the place of execution, and cutting off his head with a sword impaled his body, and returned into the city.

Thenceforth Sama accepted nought at any other man’s hand, but passed all her time, taking her pleasure with this robber only. The thought occurred to the robber: “If this woman should fall in love with any one else, she will have me too put to death, and take her pleasure with him. She is very treacherous to her friends. I must no longer dwell here, but make haste to escape.” When he was going away, he thought, “I will not go empty-handed, but will take some of the ornaments belonging to her.” So one day he said to her, “My dear, we always stay indoors like tame cockatoos in a cage. Some day we will disport ourselves in the garden.” She reality assented and prepared every kind of food, hard and soft, and decked herself with her, he thought, “Now must be the time for me to escape.” So under a show of violent affection for her, he squeezed her till she became insensible. Then throwing her down he spoiled her of all her ornaments, and fastening them in her outer garment he placed the bundle on his shoulder and leaping over the garden wall made off.

And when she had recovered consciousness, rising up she went and asked her attendants, what had become of her young lord. “We do not know, lady.” “He thinks,” she said, “I am dead, and must in his alarm have run away.” And being distressed at the thought, and from that day she neither out on comely garments, nor ate more than one meal, nor affected scents and wreaths and the like. And being resolved to seek and recover her lover by every possible means, she sent for some actors and gave them a thousand pieces of money. On their asking, “What are we to do for this, lady?” She said, “There is no place that you do not visit. Go then to every village, town and city, and gathering a crowd around you, first of all sing this song in the midst of the people,” –teaching the actors the song.

She said, “when you have sung this song, my husband shall be one of the crowds, he will speak to you. Then you may tell him I am quite well, and bring him back with you. And should he refuse to come, send me a message.” And giving them their expenses for the journey, she sent them off. They started from Benares, and calling the people together here and there, at last arrived at a border-village. Now the robber, since his flight, was living here. And the actors gathered a crowd about them, and sang the song.

The robber on hearing this said to the actor, “Whether she be alive or dead, I don’t want her,”
The actors came and told Sama how he had dealt with them. And she, full of regrets, took once more to her old course of life.

---------

The Buddha, when his lesson was ended, revealed the Truths indentified the Birth :– At the conclusion of the Truths the lovesicked Bhikkhu attained to fruition of the First Path : “At that time this Bhikkhu was the rich young merchant, the wife he had left was Sama, and I myself was the robber.”
**********
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Thu Jan 24, 2013 5:33 pm

Dear Members,

This Thursday morning...I have a wonderful story about a beautiful dancing queen who tried to seduce the Buddha with her exotic dance....and later became a lay disciple !!

:heart: Kuvalaya, The Dancing Queen :heart:

PLEASE CLICK : http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f= ... 41#p181041

*********
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Tue Jan 29, 2013 3:34 pm

SAMAVATI AND THE WICKED/BEAUTIFUL MAGANDIYA

Dear Members,

This morning I have a wonderful story " SAMAVATI AND THE WICKED MAGANDIYA" to share with you all.

Please click: http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=16033

******
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Sun Feb 03, 2013 2:02 pm

Dear Members,

This half-moon Uposatha Day, I have a story for you all.

Please click: http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=16114

******* :heart: :anjali:
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Fri Feb 08, 2013 5:13 pm

Dear Members,

This Friday, I have wonderful....Kharaputta Jataka... to present to you all:

Please click: http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=16174

*******Buddhaflower :anjali:
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Fri Feb 15, 2013 2:53 pm

Dear Members,

This cold cold Friday morning, I proudly present an amazing story of a young man who met the Buddha and had a chance to learn the great sutta about the whole domestic and social duty of a layman.

Please click: http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=16232

********Buddhaflower :anjali: :heart:
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Tue Feb 19, 2013 4:55 pm

Dear Members.....Amaidhasi: The Poor/Pretty Slave

Today I would like to present a nice story to you all. And I'm so happy that I/my husband/daughter gave robes to the sangha at the temples a few times.

Please click: http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=16268

************Buddhaflower :heart:
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Fri Feb 22, 2013 5:45 pm

Thera Sivali

Dear Members..Today I would like to present the wonderful story of Thera Sivali:

Please click: http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f= ... 81#p232481

*******Buddhaflower :anjali: :heart:
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Sat Feb 23, 2013 4:28 pm

Dear Members...I love this story of Ajita: The Next Buddha Ari-Metteya very much, please let me share with you all.

Please click : http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=12713

******Buddhaflower :heart: :anjali:
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Sun Feb 24, 2013 4:09 pm

Poisonous Fruits And Evil Villagers

Dear Members,

This lovely Sunday, I have a fun/adventurous story that I watched @ youtube for you all.

Please click: http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=11890

*******buddhaflower :heart:
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Wed Feb 27, 2013 2:42 pm

Dear Members... :heart: The Cassanova Merchant :heart:

This super cold Texas Friday, I have a fantastic story about sexual misconduct kamma for you all. When I was in junior high, my teacher talked about Sirima, the most beautiful courtesan..why she was born as a courtesan??? Her story truly shaped up my life..I was so afraid to fool around when I worked with airline-flirting-handsome-passengers/pilots/pursers/flight attendants...fear of hell..fear of kamma to be reborn as prostitute/homosexual/bad love-life/bad marriage...and I've seen the real-life kamma that happened to my beautiful friends...and many handsome male-flight-attendants I worked with were homosexuals!! So as a young 21 yrs old stewardess...I never fooled around through my 8 years-career ever..SIRIMA is truly my sex-kamma teacher !!!
:anjali: Dhammapada/Jataka stories are my ultimate teachers !!! :anjali:


Please click: http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f= ... 99#p184499

********buddhaflower :namaste: :heart:
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Sat Mar 02, 2013 3:09 pm

Dear Members ***********Sirima : Love Bites***************

This is an amazing story..I love love it !

Please click : http://www.dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=12790

****Buddhaflower :namaste: :heart:
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Mon Mar 04, 2013 3:13 am

Dear Members,

How about the story...The King's Bad Burning Love...for this Sunday night??

Please click: http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f= ... f34edf5303

*****Buddhaflower :namaste:
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Tue Mar 05, 2013 2:40 pm

Dear Members,

Today I have a wonderful story to share with you all..Uttara : The Impaled Bhikkhu :

Please click: http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=16388

********Buddhaflower :namaste:
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Thu Mar 07, 2013 3:16 pm

Dear Member,

Thera Upasena was famed as a very clever preacher (pathavighutthadhammakathika), and many joined him because of his eloquence. I hope you all enjoy reading this story.

Please click: http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=16431

Buddhaflower :namaste:
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby buddhaflower » Sat Mar 09, 2013 4:17 pm

Dear Members....Today's story.....The Brahmin “Moon Disk”

Please click: http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=12756

*****Buddhaflower :namaste: :heart:
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