My Eight Steps

Discuss your personal experience with the Dharma here. How has it enriched your life? What challenges does it present?

Re: My Eight Steps

Postby Ghid » Fri Jul 11, 2014 8:34 pm

Suffering must come in many packages.

For example eternal torment.

Image

Prometius as represented by his statue at Rockefeller Center

http://imagologiajorge.wordpress.com/2012/03/04/rockefeller-center-la-altantida-global-y-sus-simbolos/

Except that from the Buddhist point of view, toment cannot be eternal.

And there is the particular kind of suffering for teenage girls.



In kindergarten, Gramps had a sweetheart, and over the summer she moved away. My parents knew each other in high school, but I don't think that they hooked up until later.

In the same manner I know that I have a temporary relationship with J-boy, but it hurts so goo eed. I don’t know if I would call it suffering.

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Re: My Eight Steps

Postby Ghid » Sat Jul 12, 2014 3:52 am

Gramps and Mr D talked about weird stuff: French philosophers, Plato’s dialogues, Latin American history, the importance of intelligence to successful military operations, a drug dealer’s hippopotamus, the Candelaria in Bogota, la Violencia, todas las formas de lucha, etc Boys, who came to lunch with us, wanted to know: What did you do in the war? Did you have a gun? Did you kill anybody?

Gramps was in Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War. He had been in Southeast Asia, and while he was on leave in the United States, he met my grandmother. When he went back to the Philippine Islands, she followed him. Even though they were married, she could not go as his wife. Normally, military dependents can ride for free on military transport planes, but only on standby. That means that they can get a seat if there is room. During the Vietnam War, the planes on the way to Southeast Asia were full, no room for anybody extra.

Separation from a love one, maybe the qualifies as suffering.

So Granny paid her own way. She landed in Manila while the garbage workers were on strike. Coincidentally, the garbage workers in New York City were on strike, so she immediately felt at home. She hired a jeepny driver to drive her to Angeles City, which was the city near Clark Air Force Base where Gramps was stationed.

She looked for BS. That is the name of a woman, which Gramps knew in Angeles City. Probably that was not her real name. The GI’s called her BS because mostly everything she said was BS.

BS was a member of the headhunting tribe, Ifugao. They have a different view of morality. My impression is that they would find the Eight Step to be a joke.

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Re: My Eight Steps

Postby Ghid » Sat Jul 12, 2014 1:48 pm

Jubilation T Cornpone, Bodhisattva of Ten Ways to Suffer

annihilation, capitulation, catastrophe, defeat, disaster, humiliation, misjudgment, remorse, starvation, and surrender.



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Re: My Eight Steps

Postby Ghid » Sun Jul 13, 2014 1:29 am

I had intended to talk about Gramps, but I think first, I will talk about BS. Shhe owned the property befind a night club, The Agamang. Probably, she was the Agamang's landlord.

Maybe first I should explain about agamangs. In the Ifugao culture, an agamang is a children’s dormitory. Among the Ifugao, children don’t live with their parents, they live in either a boys’ agamang or a girls’ agamang. At night, the boys visit the girls in the girls’ agamang. After puberty, Ifugao children have many sexual partners before marriage. After marriage, it is similar to Christian and I’d guess also like Buddhist relationships.

So Step Four and the proper use of sex, which is part of Right Action or morality among Buddhists, is different than among the Ifugao people. They have a different view of right and wrong.

My oldest brother learned about the Ifugao tribe when he studied geography as a sophomore in high school. When Gramps learned that his grandson was learning about the headhunters with odd sexual behavior, he asked my brother to ask the teacher if he was aware.Turns out the teacher did not know about it, and by the time my next brother was a sophomore, the teacher had removed the Ifugao from the curriculum.
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Re: My Eight Steps

Postby Ghid » Sun Jul 13, 2014 12:31 pm

Jack Sparrow, Bodhisattva of Adversity

Image

Jack Sparrow seems to have had an intuitive understanding of step one and understanding things as they are. Also, I bet that I am not the first person to wonder if the Buddha was the first motivational speaker.

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Re: My Eight Steps

Postby Andrew108 » Sun Jul 13, 2014 1:44 pm

Ghid wrote:I had intended to talk about Gramps, but I think first, I will talk about BS. Shhe owned the property befind a night club, The Agamang. Probably, she was the Agamang's landlord.

Maybe first I should explain about agamangs. In the Ifugao culture, an agamang is a children’s dormitory. Among the Ifugao, children don’t live with their parents, they live in either a boys’ agamang or a girls’ agamang. At night, the boys visit the girls in the girls’ agamang. After puberty, Ifugao children have many sexual partners before marriage. After marriage, it is similar to Christian and I’d guess also like Buddhist relationships.

So Step Four and the proper use of sex, which is part of Right Action or morality among Buddhists, is different than among the Ifugao people. They have a different view of right and wrong.

My oldest brother learned about the Ifugao tribe when he studied geography as a sophomore in high school. When Gramps learned that his grandson was learning about the headhunters with odd sexual behavior, he asked my brother to ask the teacher if he was aware.Turns out the teacher did not know about it, and by the time my next brother was a sophomore, the teacher had removed the Ifugao from the curriculum.


Hi Ghid. what I have read is that sexual violence including rape is becoming more common now amongst the Ifugao. Can you confirm this? I have also read that a lot of tribal communities have been effected by pornography where someone shows these things on their phone. It seems this is often the reason given for the rape which is much the same as in other agrarian societies. I'm thinking especially of how it is in rural India.
The Blessed One said:

"What is the All? Simply the eye & forms, ear & sounds, nose & aromas, tongue & flavors, body & tactile sensations, intellect & ideas. This, monks, is called the All. Anyone who would say, 'Repudiating this All, I will describe another,' if questioned on what exactly might be the grounds for his statement, would be unable to explain, and furthermore, would be put to grief. Why? Because it lies beyond range." Sabba Sutta.
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Re: My Eight Steps

Postby Ghid » Sun Jul 13, 2014 3:07 pm

Andrew108 wrote:
Hi Ghid. what I have read is that sexual violence including rape is becoming more common now amongst the Ifugao. Can you confirm this? I have also read that a lot of tribal communities have been effected by pornography where someone shows these things on their phone. It seems this is often the reason given for the rape which is much the same as in other agrarian societies. I'm thinking especially of how it is in rural India.


I have three sources of information about the Ifugao people, my grandfather, National Geographics, and a book, which I found in a used book store. The book could be Philippine Pagans: The Autobiographies of Three Ifugaos by Roy Franklin Barton, which is available on Amazon and Google.

If I remember correctly, the copy I found has a slightly different title. My parents found me in the Philippines, so anything about the PI naturally catches my attention.

Life among the Ifugao was so violent that when the Spanish controlled the Philippines, the Ifugao people never submitted to Spanish control. Homicide, sex, and photographs, which I would call murder, rape, and pornography, may not be murder, rape, and pornography from the Ifugao point of view.

I don't know the answer to your question, but violence in Ifugao society was already so violent that I wonder if it could become more violent.

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Re: My Eight Steps

Postby Andrew108 » Sun Jul 13, 2014 3:57 pm

Thanks Ghid. I used to study anthropology. So these issues are interesting for me.
The Blessed One said:

"What is the All? Simply the eye & forms, ear & sounds, nose & aromas, tongue & flavors, body & tactile sensations, intellect & ideas. This, monks, is called the All. Anyone who would say, 'Repudiating this All, I will describe another,' if questioned on what exactly might be the grounds for his statement, would be unable to explain, and furthermore, would be put to grief. Why? Because it lies beyond range." Sabba Sutta.
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Re: My Eight Steps

Postby Ghid » Sun Jul 13, 2014 8:23 pm

Andrew108 wrote:Thanks Ghid. I used to study anthropology. So these issues are interesting for me.


Have you seen this website? Maybe it's not anthropology, more like archaeology.

http://www.ancient-origins.net/

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Re: My Eight Steps

Postby Ghid » Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:47 am

I read about mandalas and gohonzons in another thread here on Dharma Wheel. What I’m about to say is somewhat off topic for the other thread

http://www.dharmawheel.net/viewtopic.php?f=59&t=17037

so I’m going to say it here

I live in a practicing Catholic family, but I think that we no longer venerate the holy objects. Many of us wear Saint Christopher Medals. My mother’s mother’s mother prayed to the Infant of Prague. I never got the story straight about the reason. My mother´s mother prays to Saint Anthony when she has lost something. My dad has an aunt who operates a wiji board. She’s a hoot at parties.

My parents adopted me into an Irish-Italian family of practicing Catholics. We practice the sacraments. We attend rosaries, novenas, and we never miss a holy day of obligation. We attend the church carnival, and we contribute to the church building fund. Some of us attend or attended Catholic school, and some of us volunteer for Catholic charities.

For me, working as a volunteer is not so altruistic. I need it for my college entrance application.

I love going to church with my mother because I have her complete attention both going to and returning from church. Since she first acquired me, (something like finding puppy in a pet store), I have always wanted to go wherever she went. I have always told her everything, and I mean everything. She became like my priest. I tell her all my sins.

Recently, I almost had sex with my boyfriend. If I had not known that I would need to confess to Mom, I would have stripped butt naked; and we would have done it. Even so, I was so upset, that instead of waiting until Sunday morning, I woke her up, and I confessed at one on the morning.

For the same reason, I love going to rosaries. When I first came to the United States I felt like her rosary had some kind of magic, but now I know that it is a string of beads which helps people count. For example, when my mother’s father was in Southeast Asia, he often drove in remote areas which had no real roads, but even so people moved along the paths in horse carts as well as motor vehicles. Sometimes he let natives ride in his truck. When nuns rode in his truck, they measured the distance by reciting the Rosary and counting beads.

So, I think that a crucifix which decorates our wall or the mezuzah at my boyfriend’s house (his family is Jewish) have only the power we give it, except that some icons are world class masterpieces.

Image
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