The Language of the Eyes

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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Kaore » Thu Jul 17, 2014 6:59 am

LastLegend wrote:
Kaore wrote:for me zen is finding the way of growing joy through the path, through the mind, through buddha, through me, that's been my only job.


How are you different from many other folks who doing things to find their own joy?


That's a good question. I guess people are not trying to find joy through the path described by Bodhidharma which is through the mind.
People are just trying to find pleasures outside their mind and what they find is nothing satisfactory because it is empty of permanency.

My work has been to look through the eye of the mind as everyone is forced to do, to the mind again, instead of looking through the eye of the mind to outside.
So Mind looking for Mind for finding answers and joy is growing.
And Mind to outside world is pointless and suffering.
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby LastLegend » Thu Jul 17, 2014 7:07 am

Sounds good.
NAMO AMITABHA
NAM MO A DI DA PHAT (VIETNAMESE)
NAMO AMITUOFO (CHINESE)

Linjii
―Listen! Those of you who devote yourselves to the Dharma
must not be afraid of losing your bodies and your lives―
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Sherab Dorje » Thu Jul 17, 2014 8:44 am

Dan74 wrote:Not even many Theravadins believe that, Greg. I don't think this is a good basis to refute some dude's on the internet claims of enlightenment (if there is any point to that at all. )
I'm not interested in what individual ignorant beings believe (what people think as Kaore stated), I tend to lay more trust in the words of the Arhats and Bodhisattavas; in the Arya Sangha.

They teach that the a Buddha has the marks and signs. And it is not just the Sravakayanins that teach this.

You will also find them outlined in Maitreya's Abhisamaya-alaṅkāra (Ornament of Realization):
(1) On the sole of each of a Buddha’s feet and on the palm of each hand is the impression of a thousand-spoked wheel. The cause is a Buddha’s having always greeted and escorted his spiritual mentor and having had a selfless attitude of offering personal service to others.

(2) The soles of a Buddha’s feet are as smooth and level as the breast of a tortoise’s shell so that his feet are always firmly planted. This mirrors his having been firm in his promise to live in accordance with the verbal and realized indications of the Dharma and also his firmness in having safeguarded the three types of vowed restraints (vows). These are (a) the restraints for individual liberation (pratimoksha vows), (b) the restraints arising from being in a state of mental stability (bsam-gtan-gyi sdom-pa, Skt. dhyana-samvara), and (c) the restraints from being untainted (zag-med-kyi sdom-pa, Skt. anashrava-samvara). The first set include monks’ vows; the second are restraints from mental wandering, dullness, and so on, and arise from achieving absorbed concentration (ting-nge-‘dzin, Skt. samadhi); while the third include restraints from the disturbing emotions and attitudes, and arise from realizing voidness (emptiness). Thus, the three sets of vows reflect the three higher trainings in ethical self-discipline, absorbed concentration, and discriminating awareness (wisdom).

(3) The fingers and toes of a Buddha are connected with a web of white light. This feature arises from his having practiced the four ways that gather others under one’s positive influence (bsdu-ba’i dngos-po bzhi): being generous, speaking kindly, giving encouragement regarding the points of the Dharma, and setting oneself as an example by acting in accord with those points.

(4) The skin of a Buddha, no matter how old he is, remains unwrinkled and as smooth as that of an infant nursing on his mother’s milk. This reflects his having always been generous with nourishing food and drink. In the Pali tradition, this sign is having tender hands and feet.

(5) Seven parts of his body are rounded and slightly raised. These are the tops of each hand, foot, shoulder, and the back of his neck. The reason for this is his having given others not only physical nourishment, but also other outstanding objects for enjoyable use, such as best quality clothing, and so on.

(6) The fingers and toes are extremely long. This comes from his having saved the lives of animals about to be slaughtered.

(7) A Buddha’s heels jut out broadly from his feet. This is from his having compassionately gone out of his way with compassion to help others, save their lives, and make them comfortable.

(8) The body of a Buddha is very straight and seven cubits tall. A cubit is the distance from elbow to fingertip; ordinary persons are usually four cubits tall. The cause of this extra height is his final and total ridding himself of the taking of any creature’s life. The Pali tradition refers to this sign as his body being straight like that of Brahma.

(9) His elbows and kneecaps do not stand out. This is from the intensity of his practice in having perfected the six far-reaching attitudes (six perfections) of giving, ethical self-discipline, patience, joyful perseverance, mental stability (concentration), and discriminating awareness (wisdom). In the Pali tradition and in some Tibetan variants, this sign is that his anklebones do not stand out.

(10) His bodily hair grows upwards, from his having engaged in constructive practices and having inspired others to do the same.

(11) His calves are well-rounded, like the legs of an antelope. This comes from his admiration for and well-rounded mastery of medicine, astrology, arts and crafts, and his having made use of these skills to benefit others.

(12) The arms of a Buddha are extremely long. When he sits cross-legged with his elbows at his side, his hands cover his knees so that his fingers can touch his seat. This reflects his never having sent away beggars empty-handed. The Furthest Everlasting Continuum tradition adds that his arms are smooth, round and even in length.

(13) His private organ is recessed and remains concealed. This comes from his having strictly kept his pledges of secrecy and having never revealed what was meant to be held confidentially.

(14) His skin is luminous and golden in color, from his having offered soft and comfortable seats to others.

(15) His skin is likewise as fine and unblemished as purified gold free from all taints. This results from his having accommodated others in need of lodging and his having always provided excellent housing. In the Pali tradition, this sign is that a Buddha’s skin is delicate and smooth.

(16) A Buddha’s bodily hair curls clockwise, with never more than one hair growing from each pore. This is due to his having rid himself completely of mental wandering, busy work, and bustling confusion.

(17) He has a white treasure-like curl of hair (mdzod-spu, Skt. urnakesha) on his mid-brow that curls very tightly clockwise. When it is pulled from its tip, it extends a huge distance, and when released, it tightly recoils. This is one of the more difficult signs to achieve and is the result of his having served all his superiors with respect – parents, teachers, elders, spiritual masters, abbots, and so forth – and having respected them as his crown jewel. It also comes from his having helped others achieve one of the better states of wandering rebirth.

(18) The upper torso of a Buddha becomes progressively broader, like that of a lion. This comes from his having never humiliated or looked down upon others regardless of their status, power, wealth, and so on. It also results from his having never scolded others privately or in front of crowds, and having never belittled others’ beliefs or religions traditions.

(19) The top of a Buddha’s shoulders are round and well-connected to his neck, and his network of veins is not visible. This comes from his having freely given praise and encouragement to others and having acknowledged any action or person worthy of praise. In the Pali tradition, this sign is merely that his shoulders are evenly rounded.

(20) The area between a Buddha’s collarbone and shoulder is rounded, fleshy, and full, without any hollow depression. This is due to his having given others medicine and nourishing foods.

(21) A Buddha has a special faculty of taste that no matter what food he is given, it always tastes delicious. The cause for this faculty is his having nursed the sick, the old, and the infirm, and especially having cared for those whom others find distasteful and repulsive.

(22) The body of a Buddha is as stately and well-proportioned as a full-grown bodhi tree. This comes from his having built public gardens and parks for the enjoyment of others, and from having encouraged others to do the same. The Pali tradition uses the analogy here of a banyan tree.

(23) The top of his head has a crown-protrusion (gtsug-tor, Skt. ushnisha), made of radiant flesh, round and circling clockwise. When seen from a distance, it seems to be four finger-widths high, but upon closer scrutiny, its height can never be measured. This is the most difficult physical feature to achieve and is the result of his having always visualized his spiritual mentor on the crown of his head, as well as his having visited temples and monasteries and engaged in spiritual practices there.

(24) A Buddha’s tongue is extremely long and can reach the top of his head, his ears, and his chest. This comes from his having always spoken kindly to others with words of encouragement and having treated them as gently as an animal licking its young.

(25) His voice is melodious like that of an ancient song-bird, flowing without any effort, or like that of a Brahma. Whoever hears the voice of a Brahma is temporarily relieved of his or her problems. But the sound of a Buddha’s melodious and resonant enlightening speech can bring about full liberation from all fears. The cause for this faculty is his having communicated the Dharma in the individual languages of each wandering being.

(26) His cheeks are round and full like those of a lion, from his having rid himself completely of idle chatter and senseless speech. The Pali, Sanskrit and Chinese traditions explain this feature in reference to a Buddha’s jawbone or chin.

(27) The eye teeth of a Buddha are more brilliantly white than his other teeth are, because of his having given special praise to Buddhas and bodhisattvas and having shown them great respect.

(28) His teeth are all of equal length, from his having rid himself of the five wrong livelihoods and having always earned his living honestly. The five wrong livelihoods are obtaining money or material goods through (a) flattery, (b) pressure, (c) extortion – saying to someone that if he or she does not pay us money, we will expose their secrets to others, (d) bribery, and (e) pretense. The Furthest Everlasting Continuum tradition adds that a Buddha’s teeth are also free of stains.

(29) A Buddha’s teeth are perfectly aligned and straight, with no gaps between them. This is from his having spoken the straight truth for three zillion eons and having been honest, never devious or crooked with others.

(30) His teeth are forty in number, with an equal amount on the upper and lower jaw. The cause is his having rid himself of divisive language and having always worked for unity and harmony among all living creatures.

(31) The black and white portions of a Buddha’s eyes are clear and distinct, with no red or yellow discolorations. This is the result of his having looked at others with compassionate eyes, having worked for their welfare, and having generated equal concern for all, whether their suffering was great or small. The Furthest Everlasting Continuum tradition adds that the eyes of a Buddha are dark blue like a blue water lily, while the Pali tradition simply has that a Buddha’s eyes are dark blue.

(32) His eyelashes are beautiful and long, like those of a bull, with each hair distinct. This comes from his having regarded others without any attachment, hostility, or naivety, and his having striven to gain the full length of discriminating awareness to see the difference between what is correct and what is incorrect.
http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/ar ... arks_.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

And from a Vajrayana perspective Jigten Sumgon states in the Gonchig that "All deities are endowed with the qualities of the Marks and Signs."

So yes, Jesse, it is taught in all traditions.

As for the difference between realisation and enlightenment. A bodhisattva has realisation and is "graded" on the basis of these realisations. A Buddha is enlightened. From what I know the difference is that an enlightened being cannot return to ignorance but a realised being (up until the 8th bhumi, if I am not mistaken) can.

So maybe our friend kaore had a realisation, an insight. If they have then they have to practice in order to capitalise on it, or stabilise it, or else all they will be left with is the memory of the experience and will quickly fall back into deluded habit. There is still quite a way to go in order for them to make the accumulations that lead to the signs and marks.
"When one is not in accord with the true view
Meditation and conduct become delusion,
One will not attain the real result
One will be like a blind man who has no eyes."
Naropa - Summary of the View from The Eight Doha Treasures
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Kaore » Thu Jul 17, 2014 11:55 am

Sherab Dorje wrote:I'm not interested in what individual ignorant beings believe (what people think as Kaore stated)


The ignorant one is ready to answer any questions you desire, why are you scared? Ask a question, challenge me.
Do you believe in your own responsability and words you utter or act you do? As someone responsible in this forum you behave with wrong perspectives like changing my personal experience of great value of the eyes and making in it to the Lounge, no offense but are you responsible and mature here?
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Sherab Dorje » Thu Jul 17, 2014 12:37 pm

Kaore wrote:The ignorant one is ready to answer any questions you desire, why are you scared? Ask a question, challenge me.
What is my mothers maiden name?
"When one is not in accord with the true view
Meditation and conduct become delusion,
One will not attain the real result
One will be like a blind man who has no eyes."
Naropa - Summary of the View from The Eight Doha Treasures
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Kaore » Thu Jul 17, 2014 1:45 pm

Sherab Dorje wrote:What is my mothers maiden name?


you don't know what a buddha is to ask such questions. you just don't know.
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Sherab Dorje » Thu Jul 17, 2014 3:11 pm

So you failed the omniscience test. Oh well...

Next.
"When one is not in accord with the true view
Meditation and conduct become delusion,
One will not attain the real result
One will be like a blind man who has no eyes."
Naropa - Summary of the View from The Eight Doha Treasures
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby uan » Thu Jul 17, 2014 3:30 pm

Sherab Dorje wrote:
You will also find them outlined in Maitreya's Abhisamaya-alaṅkāra (Ornament of Realization):
(1) On the sole of each of a Buddha’s feet and on the palm of each hand is the impression of a thousand-spoked wheel.

...

http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/ar ... arks_.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

As for the difference between realisation and enlightenment. A bodhisattva has realisation and is "graded" on the basis of these realisations. A Buddha is enlightened. From what I know the difference is that an enlightened being cannot return to ignorance but a realised being (up until the 8th bhumi, if I am not mistaken) can.



Thanks Greg. Great reference to the Abhisamaya-alaṅkāra - it's nice to see the 32 marks expanded on. Is there one for the 80 minor marks? (I don't have the Abhisamaya-alaṅkāra to see if it's in there. Update: I'm at the URL you provided, so I go through that a bit.)

My understanding is that only a realized person can see a Buddha (or need exceptional merit). Is that the case?
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Sherab Dorje » Thu Jul 17, 2014 4:26 pm

uan wrote:My understanding is that only a realized person can see a Buddha (or need exceptional merit). Is that the case?
Apparently, yes, one needs a certain degree of realisation in order to see a Sambhogakaya Buddha.
"When one is not in accord with the true view
Meditation and conduct become delusion,
One will not attain the real result
One will be like a blind man who has no eyes."
Naropa - Summary of the View from The Eight Doha Treasures
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Mkoll » Thu Jul 17, 2014 5:45 pm

To the OP:

Image
Peace,
James
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Kaore » Thu Jul 17, 2014 8:08 pm

Sherab Dorje wrote:So you failed the omniscience test. Oh well...

Next.


omniscience is knowing whatever something you want to know, not knowing what can't be known because there are things that require acknowledgements, that's fact not a buddha test.
a buddha is not about being tested, you are a buddha, it's more about being a satisfied buddha or not.
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Sherab Dorje » Thu Jul 17, 2014 8:24 pm

Kaore wrote:omniscience is knowing whatever something you want to know, not knowing what can't be known because there are things that require acknowledgements, that's fact not a buddha test.
Bzzzzztttt... wrong! In Buddhism a Buddhas omniscience works in the following way: whatever a Buddha turns their attention to they know completely. They can see clearly all the causes and effects that lead to its reification/being.
http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/archives/sutra/level2_lamrim/initial_scope/safe_direction/qualities_buddha_omniscient_deep_aw.html
http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/archives/sutra/level4_deepening_understanding_path/time/what_buddha_knows_past_present_future/part_5.html
a buddha is not about being tested, you are a buddha, it's more about being a satisfied buddha or not.
While it is true that we all have a naturally existing capacity to enlightenment (Tathagatagarbha) this does not mean we are Buddhas though. Buddhas are beyond the dualism of satisfaction or non-satisfaction.
"When one is not in accord with the true view
Meditation and conduct become delusion,
One will not attain the real result
One will be like a blind man who has no eyes."
Naropa - Summary of the View from The Eight Doha Treasures
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Kaore » Thu Jul 17, 2014 8:42 pm

Sherab Dorje wrote:Bzzzzztttt... wrong! In Buddhism a Buddhas omniscience works in the following way: whatever a Buddha turns their attention to they know completely. They can see clearly all the causes and effects that lead to its reification/being.
http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/archives/sutra/level2_lamrim/initial_scope/safe_direction/qualities_buddha_omniscient_deep_aw.html
http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/archives/sutra/level4_deepening_understanding_path/time/what_buddha_knows_past_present_future/part_5.html


yes and knowing the causes and effects that lead to its reification is not knowing what is not valid or are unknowable knowledge that require acknowledgement. This is simple there are things you can't know unless you go there somehow.


Sherab Dorje wrote:While it is true that we all have a naturally existing capacity to enlightenment (Tathagatagarbha) this does not mean we are Buddhas though. Buddhas are beyond the dualism of satisfaction or non-satisfaction.


do you know what a buddha is? rather than asking to others on the internet with many sources?
a buddha is you simple. you said buddha are beyond satisfaction/non satisfaction dualism, so let me ask you a question: what do you want from your life, being something you will never know or being content?
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby garudha » Thu Jul 17, 2014 10:09 pm

Kaore wrote:lol you make me laugh, ask me questions I am ready to be clear now :twothumbsup:


Hi Kaore,

Please excuse my terrible English skills. I never had much of an education. Although I don't write very clearly, if you try, you should be able to extract the meaning of my words. Note; I don't seek to engage you in petty arguments but would only like to try and understand your perspective on this life we find ourselves in.

The question(s) will be presented in the final paragraph(s), but before I ask that/those question(s), please allow me to set the mood, or tone, so we are "on the same page"...

Scientists try to measure and work-out every facet of this reality (i.e manifest phenomena, dimensionality or vector) by means of exact measurement, as I'm sure you're aware. They reject notions of God, because a god, existing as --or within-- a secondary dimensionality could not be proved by means available within our primary dimensionality.

However; if we do away with the notion that "God" exists as a dualism, or is separate from our present dimensionality, we can frame our present condition like so:..

The totality of all manifest phenomena (i.e the entire dimensionality) is an expression of a divine law. (and we might give that law names such as "God" or "Buddha Nature" ...etc)

My question(s) to you are as follows;

(1) If the previous italicized sentence is true, then what are the qualities of such a divine law "in which" (or, "of which") we find ourselves ?

(2) Further; If the previous italicized sentence is untrue, then is manifest phenomena a significant expression of anything we might be able to understand or realize through Enlightenment ?

(3) Finally; if manifest phenomena is an expression which has no qualitative significance, then is your enlightenment actually signifiant, or does your enlightenment have any significance whatsoever in this insignificant universe ?

Please answer however you deem appropriate.

Thank You & Best Regards.
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Kaore » Thu Jul 17, 2014 10:39 pm

garudha wrote:Hi Kaore,

The totality of all manifest phenomena (i.e the entire dimensionality) is an expression of a divine law. (and we might give that law names such as "God" or "Buddha Nature" ...etc)


Hello Garudha, thank you for asking, I enjoy answering questions around the Dhamma.

garudha wrote:My question(s) to you are as follows;

(1) If the previous italicized sentence is true, then what are the qualities of such a divine law "in which" (or, "of which") we find ourselves ?

(2) Further; If the previous italicized sentence is untrue, then is manifest phenomena a significant expression of anything we might be able to understand or realize through Enlightenment ?

(3) Finally; if manifest phenomena is an expression which has no qualitative significance, then is your enlightenment actually signifiant, or does your enlightenment have any significance whatsoever in this insignificant universe ?

Please answer however you deem appropriate.

Thank You & Best Regards.


(1) The Dhamma or Divine law or Dharma are the natural state of all that we can be aware of which is love and compassion. I don't feel so much love and compassion right now as I am freshly discovering the natural state of my mind spreading its naturalness to my being everywhere. Love and compassion that goes together is the ground of all that is I would say because I feel naturally drown by these feelings.

(2) All phenomena are expression of the Mind and Love is the ground for such expression. If I look to my experience and only that, I can understand that this noise is coming from the doing of someone, this thinking is from my own doing, this consequence is coming from such causes and so on. Where there are minds, there are phenomena and as the Mind is not subject of any descriptions or understanding about it like its origination, then phenomena will always be there. For me phenomena is what trappes us in a vicious circle, if you felt hurt, if your mind is hurt in any way, you are trapped. If phenomena hurt your mind you are in samsara and you have not get out from it yet.

(3)Enlightenment is an understanding at first then automatically you realize that your mind has achieved joy, that's the end of samsara.

regards
Last edited by Kaore on Thu Jul 17, 2014 10:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby garudha » Thu Jul 17, 2014 11:45 pm

Thank you, Kaore. I'm very happy to read your reply.

I found what you wrote (below) very interesting. You said something very simple, very ordinary, so I tried to consider your perspective and why you would write something so simple... something so simple that another person would not write it....

Who you are? Wanna know? What do you think if I am telling you that you are the one reading this and blinking with the Eyes, reading with the eye and blinking with the language of the eye?


How did you come to learn about this,.. did you simply realise through your thoughts & feelings in your everyday life experiences, Kaore ?

May I ask how old you are (approximately) ?

Regards,
Garudha
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Kaore » Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:46 am

garudha wrote:Thank you, Kaore. I'm very happy to read your reply.

I found what you wrote (below) very interesting. You said something very simple, very ordinary, so I tried to consider your perspective and why you would write something so simple... something so simple that another person would not write it....

Who you are? Wanna know? What do you think if I am telling you that you are the one reading this and blinking with the Eyes, reading with the eye and blinking with the language of the eye?


How did you come to learn about this,.. did you simply realise through your thoughts & feelings in your everyday life experiences, Kaore ?

May I ask how old you are (approximately) ?

Regards,
Garudha


I am glad that you liked it. I haven't realized yet at this time that it was actually my mind using the eye reading this and blinking. How I come to this is just trying to understand what's going on and what I can do to feel better. That's was my basic approach to grow. To be more precise, I turn my preoccupation into the one trying to solve any trouble I am facing like the mind turning into what it can do to solve its own problems until arriving to more and more what I am which is internal and not outside, that's very logical. The more I tried to grow through trying to get to know what I can do concretely with my being, the more I went deeper into me until I reached my state of joy which is the natural state of our beautiful mind.

I am 31 :smile:

ps: I communicate with Gautama from mind to mind, he has appeared some time for me, he is very accessible, if you need help he will be there. He has helped me to be enlightened, I haven't achieved this alone. I am serious :thumbsup:
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby garudha » Fri Jul 18, 2014 1:35 am

Kaore wrote:.... the more I went deeper into me until I reached my state of joy which is the natural state of our beautiful mind.


I hope you can be strong in kindness for others, then maybe they'll consider looking inside too, best wishes.
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Kaore » Fri Jul 18, 2014 2:28 am

garudha wrote:I hope you can be strong in kindness for others, then maybe they'll consider looking inside too, best wishes.


best wishes
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Re: The Language of the Eyes

Postby Sherab Dorje » Fri Jul 18, 2014 8:53 am

This is simple there are things you can't know unless you go there somehow.
That's right, and Buddhas know these things by turning their attention to them (going there somehow). You are just going to have face the fact that, according to Buddhist criteria, you are not fully enlightened. It is that simple. Mybe according to your criteria you are, but this is a "Buddhist discussion forum on Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism" so your criteria take a back seat to the criteria of the Arya Sangha.
Kaore wrote:do you know what a buddha is? rather than asking to others on the internet with many sources?
a buddha is you simple. you said buddha are beyond satisfaction/non satisfaction dualism, so let me ask you a question: what do you want from your life, being something you will never know or being content?
Being enlightened.
"When one is not in accord with the true view
Meditation and conduct become delusion,
One will not attain the real result
One will be like a blind man who has no eyes."
Naropa - Summary of the View from The Eight Doha Treasures
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