Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

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Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby M1NDFUL » Thu Mar 07, 2013 4:20 pm

Greetings everyone,

I recently started attending a Buddhist center close to my residence for some meditation instruction. However after reading a little more into the different traditions of Buddhism (I had no idea there were so many) I found that the center I was attending was in the Kadampa tradition. Through a little more reading I decided that I was truly interested in following the Dzogchen teachings. There is a center on the opposite side of my state (which luckily Connecticut isn't that large) that I plan on attending to further my practice in this tradition. However before doing so, I was hoping perhaps someone here could recommend a good book for an introduction into the Dzogchen studies? Perhaps reading text in this specific line of teaching isn't necessary before attending the Center, but it would just make me a little more comfortable.

Gassho,
- Jeff
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby M1NDFUL » Thu Mar 07, 2013 4:58 pm

Dhondrub wrote:http://www.amazon.com/The-Words-Perfect-Teacher-Introduction/dp/0300165323


http://www.amazon.com/Perfect-Clarity-B ... hen+primer


Wow, what a coincidence. One of the teachers at the Center for Dzogchen Studies where I plan on attending is indeed Patrul Rinpoche. Thanks for the recommendation!
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby Jikan » Thu Mar 07, 2013 5:16 pm

Need help getting on retreat? Want to support others in practice? Pay the Dana for Dharma forum a visit...

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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby M1NDFUL » Thu Mar 07, 2013 5:31 pm

Much thanks for the quick responses! Seems I have quite a bit of reading ahead of me.
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby Madeliaette » Thu Mar 07, 2013 6:22 pm

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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby asunthatneversets » Thu Mar 07, 2013 11:32 pm

M1NDFUL wrote:Wow, what a coincidence. One of the teachers at the Center for Dzogchen Studies where I plan on attending is indeed Patrul Rinpoche. Thanks for the recommendation!


Different Patrul Rinpoche then, the Patrul Rinpoche who was an iconic key figure and prominent teacher of the Nyingma (mentioned above) passed in 1887. This is the Patrul Rinpoche who may be teaching at the center you're planning on attending: http://www.patrulrinpoche.org/
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby Dronma » Sat Mar 09, 2013 1:20 am

M1NDFUL wrote:Wow, what a coincidence. One of the teachers at the Center for Dzogchen Studies where I plan on attending is indeed Patrul Rinpoche. Thanks for the recommendation!


The contemporary Patrul Rinpoche is great teacher!!! Go for it!!! :smile:

A little note: the sect of New Kadampa and Dzogchen (Guru Rinpoche's lineage) do not go well together.... ;)



The Mirror: Advice on the Presence of Awareness
http://www.amazon.com/The-Mirror-Advice-Presence-Awareness/dp/1886449104/

Golden Letters: The Three Statements Of Garab Dorje, First Dzogchen Master
http://www.amazon.com/Golden-Letters-Statements-Dzogchen-Master/dp/1559390506/

Dzogchen: The Self-Perfected State
http://www.amazon.com/Dzogchen-Self-Perfected-Chogyal-Namkhai-Norbu/dp/1559390573/
"My view is as vast as the sky, but my actions are finer than flour"
~ Padmasambhava ~
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby Yudron » Sat Mar 09, 2013 2:06 am

M1NDFUL wrote:Greetings everyone,

I recently started attending a Buddhist center close to my residence for some meditation instruction. However after reading a little more into the different traditions of Buddhism (I had no idea there were so many) I found that the center I was attending was in the Kadampa tradition. Through a little more reading I decided that I was truly interested in following the Dzogchen teachings. There is a center on the opposite side of my state (which luckily Connecticut isn't that large) that I plan on attending to further my practice in this tradition. However before doing so, I was hoping perhaps someone here could recommend a good book for an introduction into the Dzogchen studies? Perhaps reading text in this specific line of teaching isn't necessary before attending the Center, but it would just make me a little more comfortable.

Gassho,
- Jeff


Jeff, you should do some research about this center, or any center you get involved in. You may like the American lama there, but you should know that -- although they appear to now be doing traditional practices in connection with Tibetan lamas -- in the past his center was centered on unconventional practices that he believed to be his own "Shakyamuni Heart" revelation. There are many authentic centers of Tibetan Buddhist practice in New England, I suggest taking some time and checking out all lamas and centers and see if that one is where you feel most comfortable, and search on the web and talk to people who have been connected with Tibetan Buddhism for 15 or 20 years about their knowledge of the lamas involved. :thinking:
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby dzogchungpa » Sat Mar 09, 2013 4:21 am

Yudron wrote:Jeff, you should do some research about this center, or any center you get involved in. You may like the American lama there, but you should know that -- although they appear to now be doing traditional practices in connection with Tibetan lamas -- in the past his center was centered on unconventional practices that he believed to be his own "Shakyamuni Heart" revelation. There are many authentic centers of Tibetan Buddhist practice in New England, I suggest taking some time and checking out all lamas and centers and see if that one is where you feel most comfortable, and search on the web and talk to people who have been connected with Tibetan Buddhism for 15 or 20 years about their knowledge of the lamas involved. :thinking:

What's the deal, Yudron? I've never heard of this guy.
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby M1NDFUL » Mon Mar 11, 2013 2:28 pm

I'm a little lost now... I have no interest in going back to the Odiyana Center in Glastonbury, CT which is part of the New Kadampa Tradition. The center I plan on attending in the near future is The Center for Dzogchen Studies in New Haven, CT.

I've done my research on the NKT, not my cup of tea. Like I said, I went there prior to learning about all of the different traditions in Buddhism.
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby ocean_waves » Mon Mar 11, 2013 4:05 pm

M1NDFUL wrote:I'm a little lost now... I have no interest in going back to the Odiyana Center in Glastonbury, CT which is part of the New Kadampa Tradition. The center I plan on attending in the near future is The Center for Dzogchen Studies in New Haven, CT.

I've done my research on the NKT, not my cup of tea. Like I said, I went there prior to learning about all of the different traditions in Buddhism.


I don't know where you are in CT, but if it isn't too far out of your way there is a Nalandabodhi center in Bloomfield, CT [http://ct.nalandabodhi.org/]. It is founded by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, author of Rebel Buddha [http://www.shambhala.com/rebel-buddha.html], as well as other books on Dzogchen. They are definitely not New Kadampa!

Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche is very good at getting to the "essence" of the Buddha's dhamma, beyond the "cultural trappings" of East or West.
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False seeing is worldliness:
Set aside both right and wrong,
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby M1NDFUL » Mon Mar 11, 2013 4:41 pm

ocean_waves wrote:
M1NDFUL wrote:I'm a little lost now... I have no interest in going back to the Odiyana Center in Glastonbury, CT which is part of the New Kadampa Tradition. The center I plan on attending in the near future is The Center for Dzogchen Studies in New Haven, CT.

I've done my research on the NKT, not my cup of tea. Like I said, I went there prior to learning about all of the different traditions in Buddhism.


I don't know where you are in CT, but if it isn't too far out of your way there is a Nalandabodhi center in Bloomfield, CT [http://ct.nalandabodhi.org/]. It is founded by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, author of Rebel Buddha [http://www.shambhala.com/rebel-buddha.html], as well as other books on Dzogchen. They are definitely not New Kadampa!

Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche is very good at getting to the "essence" of the Buddha's dhamma, beyond the "cultural trappings" of East or West.
:anjali:


Wow, thanks. I live in South Windsor, Bloomfield isn't far at all. Much closer than New Haven, CT. Thanks! Do you attend?
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby ocean_waves » Mon Mar 11, 2013 5:18 pm

M1NDFUL wrote:
Wow, thanks. I live in South Windsor, Bloomfield isn't far at all. Much closer than New Haven, CT. Thanks! Do you attend?


I haven't attended yet, but plan to do so. I live in Hartford, just discovered the center after reading "Rebel Buddha" and doing an online search for centers affiliated with Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche.
"True seeing is called transcendence;
False seeing is worldliness:
Set aside both right and wrong,
And the nature of enlightenment is clear."
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby M1NDFUL » Mon Mar 11, 2013 5:28 pm

ocean_waves wrote:
M1NDFUL wrote:
Wow, thanks. I live in South Windsor, Bloomfield isn't far at all. Much closer than New Haven, CT. Thanks! Do you attend?


I haven't attended yet, but plan to do so. I live in Hartford, just discovered the center after reading "Rebel Buddha" and doing an online search for centers affiliated with Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche.


It definitely seems like a nice place. But I just noticed that they have set fees for membership. While I can totally afford it, I am not in favor of that. The Center in New Haven is based in Vajrayana (what I am interested in) and is donation based, which is how I feel it should be. I'm not ruling it out altogether, as I like how they have courses on site to further your understanding of the teachings. But I will be giving the Center in New Haven a chance first.

Thank you very much for the info though.

:namaste:
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby ocean_waves » Mon Mar 11, 2013 5:47 pm

I hear you, it is my understanding that their fees are not set in stone, but I agree with you 100% about a fee-based center.
"True seeing is called transcendence;
False seeing is worldliness:
Set aside both right and wrong,
And the nature of enlightenment is clear."
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby CrawfordHollow » Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:22 am

You should check out Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, I believe he is coming to Conn this spring. I don't know much about this "Dzogchen center" in New Haven but I have some serious doubts about it... Anyway, Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche is the real deal, one of the finest English-speaking teachers out there in fact- so you can't go wrong. If you can make it up to Vermont at all, there will be some excellent Mahamudra/Dzogchen retreats going on this summer. Check out the Drikung Dzogchen Community of Vermont. The facebook page is a better source than the actual website. In fact, there will be a Fivefold Mahamudra empowerment and retreat coming up in a couple of weeks. I am very involved with this lineage and the director of the center is a good friend of mine if you have any questions.

Troy

Edit: Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche is also Vajrayana based, but he certaintly emphasizes all levels of the Buddha's teaching. He structures the path so his students get a solid foundation of both practice and study of all levels of sutra and tantra. You should also check out www.vajraechoes.com There are some great teachings available, and the owner lives in Hartford, I believe. He is a wonderful man who has been a student of DPR for many years. Give him a call, he would be glad to give you some advice. He probably knows about the center in New Haven as well. His number is on the website.
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby M1NDFUL » Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:14 pm

Here's a link to the Dzogchen Center in New Haven... I'm just curious where any doubt may be coming from? If you have the time, can you browse the site for me and tell me if there is anything awry that catches your eye? I'd really love to check out some of the places mentioned in this thread as there is such high praise, but travelling to Vermont regularly is just not logical.

http://www.dzogchenstudies.com/
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby Adamantine » Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:58 pm

Hi Mindful, I don't know much about this center, but I do trust Yudron. She's not the
type of person to get involved in idle gossip. It is worthwhile to consider what she said.
Since you're new to the Dharma it may be confusing, but particularly in Vajrayana
lineage is of utmost importance. Anybody can just SAY they are a Vajra master, or a great
teacher, or an authentic Guru. But in our tradition if they haven't truly been authorized to teach
or give empowerment by their own Guru, then in general, if they go ahead and do that anyway
the special bond of transmission is broken. And even if they have been empowered
or encouraged to teach, if they begin just making up new teachings instead of transmitting
the actual lineage...then that becomes a degeneration. A great terton may reveal
new treasures, and a great master may have pure visions, but these are very special and rare, and usually prophesied.
So it may be good to be a bit cautious of this teacher. The most essential thing in Vajrayana
is the guru. So the analysis and study of a potential Guru's qualities is really important.
It is not the best path to choose one based on convenience alone( the closest center ).
Regarding membership fees: this is usually due to a center needing to pay rent, property taxes or other operational expenses. Since it is a community space, the community needs to pitch in for it to keep
existing and functioning. It is a bit naive to expect all Dharma centers to just have
rich benefactors that enable everyone else to attend for free . Asking for a donation or a fee-- either
way it doesn't mean any profit is being made--actually unlikely! Sometimes when the phrase "donation"
is used then no one offers much and basic expenses aren't even covered !


In my humble opinion, Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche is one of the best communicators of Dzogchen in the English
language that I have encountered. I really recommend making a connection.
Contentment is the ultimate wealth;
Detachment is the final happiness. ~Sri Saraha
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Re: Some good literature for an introduction to Dzogchen?

Postby CrawfordHollow » Tue Mar 12, 2013 1:50 pm

Actually Jeff,

I think I may have been thinking about someone else. After looking at the website I honestly can't say I know anything at all about Lama Padma Karma. I would also take the word of Yudron and would suggest again calling Patrick at Vajra Echoes. He lives in Conn and has been involved in the Dharma since the early seventies. I can say with certainty that there aren't many teachers out there like Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, so you can't really go wrong. I don't think driving three or four hours for the Dharma is that unreasonable, I have travelled thousands of miles to get empowerments across the country before. We have people coming from all over the world for some of the events up in Vermont. Just something to keep in mind.
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