Rigpa vs. Nature of Mind

User avatar
Karma Dorje
Posts: 1236
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2011 10:35 pm

Re: Rigpa vs. Nature of Mind

Postby Karma Dorje » Mon Sep 09, 2013 6:48 am

"Although my view is higher than the sky, My respect for the cause and effect of actions is as fine as grains of flour."
-Padmasambhava

User avatar
heart
Posts: 3950
Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2010 1:55 pm

Re: Rigpa vs. Nature of Mind

Postby heart » Mon Sep 09, 2013 7:02 am

Pointing-out is anyway just the beginning of Dzogchen practice. There is no problem combining Dzogchen practice with any other practice like ngondro, lodjong, hyt or whatever.

/magnus
"We are all here to help each other go through this thing, whatever it is."
~Kurt Vonnegut

"The principal practice is Guruyoga. But we need to understand that any secondary practice combined with Guruyoga becomes a principal practice." ChNNR (Teachings on Thun and Ganapuja)

User avatar
Karma Dorje
Posts: 1236
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2011 10:35 pm

Re: Rigpa vs. Nature of Mind

Postby Karma Dorje » Mon Sep 09, 2013 7:20 am

"Although my view is higher than the sky, My respect for the cause and effect of actions is as fine as grains of flour."
-Padmasambhava

User avatar
heart
Posts: 3950
Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2010 1:55 pm

Re: Rigpa vs. Nature of Mind

Postby heart » Mon Sep 09, 2013 8:59 am

"We are all here to help each other go through this thing, whatever it is."
~Kurt Vonnegut

"The principal practice is Guruyoga. But we need to understand that any secondary practice combined with Guruyoga becomes a principal practice." ChNNR (Teachings on Thun and Ganapuja)

User avatar
smcj
Posts: 5265
Joined: Wed May 29, 2013 6:13 am

Re: Rigpa vs. Nature of Mind

Postby smcj » Mon Sep 09, 2013 10:19 am

Don't take me too seriously.

oldbob
Posts: 645
Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 8:19 am

Re: Rigpa vs. Nature of Mind

Postby oldbob » Mon Oct 07, 2013 8:25 pm

:namaste:

Many excellent posts. :twothumbsup: :good: :twothumbsup:

We practice to become enlightened.
Ref the siddhis / skillful means, resulting from practice, perhaps these are the "spare change" of the the benefits of practice and not the goal.
______________________________________________________________

Just woke up from a long after-lunch nap. I am an old guy. Naps-r-us.

It's one of those days in Tuscany when the sky is touching the earth. Looking out my window is like a Chinese painting with olive trees blurry in the heavy mist. Beyond a short distance everything is mist. Sheep graze, in the near meadow, white blurry forms moving in the white mist. It's nice & cozy but I know it will get cold later and I will need to light a fire. Luckily I have an inside store of dry firewood that the mist has not penetrated. Just have to clean all the junk away from the pot bellied stove. The lightning storms have not knocked out the electricity, today, and I can connect the computer. Amazingly my radio connection goes right through the mist and reaches Dharma Wheel. Hooray for technology. ET phone home.

So what does all of this blah blah have to do with rigpa vs. nature of mind? Good question.

Looking out the window (with awareness / instant presence) is nature of mind, even if I/you don't look. Observing yourself, (in a non-dual way) looking out the window, or observing not looking (in instant presence) is rigpa. Being the mist and the fuzzy olive trees, and the observer, both without name, are the non-dual appearances, the display of the natural mind. In the clarity and luminosity of instant presence, everything is perfected: everything is OK, just as it is.

Relaxing into this, there is nothing to say or to be done, and the question of “Nature of Mind / Rigpa” dissolves into contemplation: yet saying everything and doing everything is also OK.

For anyone engaged in striving (seeking anything: power, money, good health, gain, praise, fame, and happiness, love, etc. (especially the etc.)) you can say to them that the dharma bozo, old bob, says that the first step beyond this endless activity, is to just relax. Constant struggle, and burn out, in the red dust of the world isn't helpful in solving the problems of life. Letting go of everything, in contemplation, even just for a moment, provides a base of unattached awareness / energy from which all actions can be more easily accomplished. Just stop and relax, sinking into this stopping. Just stop (with unintentional awareness).


Look out the window; observe yourself (non-dual) looking out the window, even for a moment, (maybe make some tea) observe a gentle breath, and then attend to what needs doing, with that doing / attendance, informed by the empty space of that stopping / observing. Then you are that empty space combined with your activity. With that perspective, things are different and you have changed, and everything is much lighter.

Then accept that whatever appears to mind, body, emotion, is just fine, as it is. Relaxing into this, is the natural mind. Being aware of this, in a non-dual way, is rigpa.

:heart:

User avatar
heart
Posts: 3950
Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2010 1:55 pm

Re: Rigpa vs. Nature of Mind

Postby heart » Tue Oct 08, 2013 6:14 am

God post oldbob, ultimately this isn't a intellectual thing. We need to find confidence in what was pointed out, or else we will be endlessly searching.

/magnus
"We are all here to help each other go through this thing, whatever it is."
~Kurt Vonnegut

"The principal practice is Guruyoga. But we need to understand that any secondary practice combined with Guruyoga becomes a principal practice." ChNNR (Teachings on Thun and Ganapuja)

Simon E.
Posts: 4372
Joined: Tue May 15, 2012 11:09 am

Re: Rigpa vs. Nature of Mind

Postby Simon E. » Tue Oct 08, 2013 8:52 am

" My heart's in the Highlands
my heart is not here.
My heart's in the Highlands
chasing the deer."

Robert V.C. Burns.


Return to “Dzogchen”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests