Saddhamma: True Dhamma

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Saddhamma: True Dhamma

Postby buddhaflower » Fri Mar 22, 2013 2:44 pm

Dear Members,

Today I cut my first blooms 'Caribbean Rose' for my Buddhas-shrine..they are so beautiful..my birthday gift 2 years ago, it grows fast, big bush with many blooms now.

Image

:heart: Saddhamma: True Dhamma :heart:
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ SD/JTN]

What are the seven true dhammas, when a disciple of the noble ones is endowed with, he/she can obtain at will --without difficulty, without trouble-- the four jhaanas that provide a pleasant abiding in the here-&-now? They are the following:

1. He/she has conviction, is convinced of the Tathagata's Awakening. He/she abandons what is unskillful, develops what is skillful, abandons what is blameworthy, develops what is blameless, and looks after him/herself with purity.

2. He/she feels shame at [the thought of engaging in] bodily misconduct, verbal misconduct, mental misconduct. He/she feels shame at falling into evil, unskillful actions. He/she abandons ...

3. He/she feels concern for [the suffering that results from] bodily misconduct, verbal misconduct, mental misconduct. He/she feels concern at falling into evil, unskillful actions. He/she abandons ...

4. Whatever teachings are admirable in the beginning, admirable in the middle, admirable in the end, that --in their meaning & expression-- he/she has listened to often, retained, discussed, accumulated, examined with his/her mind, and well-penetrated in terms of views. He/she abandons ...

5. He/she keeps his/her persistence aroused for abandoning unskillful mental qualities and taking on skillful mental qualities, is steadfast, solid in his/her effort, not shirking his/her duties with regard to skillful mental qualities. He/she abandons ...

6. He/she is mindful, highly meticulous, remembering & able to call to mind even things that were done & said long ago. He/she abandons ...

7. He/she is discerning, endowed with discernment leading to the arising of the goal --noble, penetrating, leading to the right ending of stress. He/she abandons what is unskillful, develops what is skillful, abandons what is blameworthy, develops what is blameless, and looks after him/herself with purity.

--------

Tep: It is my understanding that with the seven true dhammas (saddhamma) that are well developed a noble disciple can then obtain the four jhaanas at will.

*********
:heart: Love Buddha's dhamma,
yawares/sirikanya :heart:
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Re: Saddhamma: True Dhamma

Postby Tellidall » Fri Mar 22, 2013 6:41 pm

I've never really understood this, I guess. It talks about conviction, shame, concern, and so on -- it seems to me that these are merely forms of attachment to particular patterns of behavior. Wouldn't it be more accurate to say,
1. He/she abandons what is unskillful, develops what is skillful, abandons what is blameworthy, develops what is blameless, and looks after him/herself with purity -- without a conviction in Tagatha's awakening?
2/3. He/she does not engage in bodily misconduct, verbal misconduct, mental misconduct, etc -- not necessarily without shame or concern in the case of failure to do so, or at the thoughts of doing so?
The rest seem action-based and oriented around submersion in the moment, but these 2/3 seem to be attachment-based and thus detrimental. It's more about taking the action of cultivating particular patterns of thought, rather than feeling shame, concern, or conviction about the matters? Aren't those latter things just something to be snuffed out?

I am genuinely curious on the Buddhist view on this -- I'm not strictly a Buddhist, but as someone who has studied it a bit in an incoherent fashion, it seems to me that the core message is to simply act and be, knowing one's own temporary place in the universe is exactly where one is now, and that it will go where it needs to go?
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Re: Saddhamma: True Dhamma

Postby buddhaflower » Sat Mar 23, 2013 2:25 am

Dear Tellidall,

If you really want to discuss about this article...please go to.... Sariputtadhamma or Journey to nibbana(dhamma discussion groups)...Tep Sastri hosts these 2 websides. I just posted his article because I like it.. BUT I do not know how to answer you...my English is kind of bad.

Buddhaflower :namaste:
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Re: Saddhamma: True Dhamma

Postby jeeprs » Sat Mar 23, 2013 4:34 am

tellidall wrote: I'm not strictly a Buddhist, but as someone who has studied it a bit in an incoherent fashion, it seems to me that the core message is to simply act and be, knowing one's own temporary place in the universe is exactly where one is now, and that it will go where it needs to go?


No, that is not the 'core message'. The 'core message' is the content of the various collections of the teaching, which are quite vast in extent, being many times the volume of the Bible. The statement in the Original Post is very much a succinct presentation of 'the core message'. 'Simply acting and being' is not.

There is no compulsion to study or follow Buddhist teachings, so if they don't appeal to you, don't by any means feel you should be obliged to observe them. But don't misrepresent them either.

Nice picture, by the way :smile:
He that knows it, knows it not.
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Re: Saddhamma: True Dhamma

Postby Johnny Dangerous » Sun Mar 24, 2013 4:56 am

Tellidall wrote:I've never really understood this, I guess. It talks about conviction, shame, concern, and so on -- it seems to me that these are merely forms of attachment to particular patterns of behavior. Wouldn't it be more accurate to say,
1. He/she abandons what is unskillful, develops what is skillful, abandons what is blameworthy, develops what is blameless, and looks after him/herself with purity -- without a conviction in Tagatha's awakening?
2/3. He/she does not engage in bodily misconduct, verbal misconduct, mental misconduct, etc -- not necessarily without shame or concern in the case of failure to do so, or at the thoughts of doing so?
The rest seem action-based and oriented around submersion in the moment, but these 2/3 seem to be attachment-based and thus detrimental. It's more about taking the action of cultivating particular patterns of thought, rather than feeling shame, concern, or conviction about the matters? Aren't those latter things just something to be snuffed out?

I am genuinely curious on the Buddhist view on this -- I'm not strictly a Buddhist, but as someone who has studied it a bit in an incoherent fashion, it seems to me that the core message is to simply act and be, knowing one's own temporary place in the universe is exactly where one is now, and that it will go where it needs to go?


The rest of it was already addressed, but conviction in the Buddhas awakening is kind of a basic requirement for being a Buddhist, if one does not have that, almost of any the teachings are (at best) some form of lukewarm psychotherapy. If someone does not believe that what the Buddha teaches leads to the end of suffering, there is no point in any of it really.
"Just as a lotus does not grow out of a well-levelled soil but from the mire, in the same way the awakening mind
is not born in the hearts of disciples in whom the moisture of attachment has dried up. It grows instead in the hearts of ordinary sentient beings who possess in full the fetters of bondage." -Se Chilbu Choki Gyaltsen
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