Pure Land teachings from a Zen perspective

Dharma Flower
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Pure Land teachings from a Zen perspective

Postby Dharma Flower » Tue Jan 03, 2017 5:55 am

I am wondering what books or articles on Pure Land practice you might recommend from a Zen perspective. I've read several books along these lines, but not one that an actual Zen Buddhist recommended for me to read. I really appreciate any help or guidance that you're able to provide, as this is a type of Buddhist literature that I find very interesting.

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Astus
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Re: Pure Land teachings from a Zen perspective

Postby Astus » Tue Jan 03, 2017 1:00 pm

Pure Land, Pure Mind, Mind-seal of the Buddhas, Pure Land of the Patriarchs are all representatives of mainstream Chinese Buddhism where it makes little sense to talk about PL and Zen as if they were separate traditions. It is more a question of emphasis in one's own practice. More on that read here.
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

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Meido
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Re: Pure Land teachings from a Zen perspective

Postby Meido » Tue Jan 03, 2017 4:57 pm

Not a written resource, but a nice talk by the late Chan master Sheng-yen that may serve as a jumping off point:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m9vxoMMUmEU

A number of other videos on related topics may be found in that YouTube channel.
It is relatively easy to accomplish the important matter of insight into one's True Nature, but uncommonly difficult to function freely and clearly (according to this understanding), in motion and in rest, in good and in adverse circumstances. Please make strenuous and vigorous efforts towards this end, otherwise all the teachings of Buddhas and patriarchs become mere empty words. - Torei

http://www.korinji.org
http://www.rinzaizen.org
http://www.madisonrinzaizen.org

Dharma Flower
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Re: Pure Land teachings from a Zen perspective

Postby Dharma Flower » Thu Jan 05, 2017 5:23 am

Thank you for these recommendations. Are there Zen Buddhists in the West who read and put into practice these Pure Land-related materials explained from a Zen perspective? It seems that Zen in the West might not always be in tune with the devotional practices found in Zen as practiced in Asia, even including Japan.

crazy-man
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Re: Pure Land teachings from a Zen perspective

Postby crazy-man » Thu Jan 05, 2017 10:01 am

Honen Shonin (Jodo-Shu), Shinran Shonin (Jodo-Shin-Shu), Myōan Eisai (Rinzai-Shu), Dogen Zenji (Soto-Shu) and Nichiren Daishonin (Nichiren-Shu) were former monks of the Tendai-Shu and i think that they took some elements from the teaching of the Tendai-Shu into their own teachings.

Zen & Sukhavati by Patriarche Yin Kouang
https://www.amazon.com/Zen-Sukhavati-Pa ... B001UB44GE

The Lotus Sutra as a Source for Dogen's Discourse Style
http://www.thezensite.com/ZenEssays/Dog ... ource.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zen_scriptures

ZEN PURE-LAND Letters from Patriarch Yin Kuang
http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/yin_kuang.pdf

History of Meditative Pure Land Practice
http://www.cloudwater.org/index.php/pur ... d-practice

shaunc
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Re: Pure Land teachings from a Zen perspective

Postby shaunc » Thu Jan 05, 2017 10:43 am

There was also a famous zen monk in the west named Suzuki, sorry but I can't remember his first name, who in his later years changed over to shin.

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Astus
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Re: Pure Land teachings from a Zen perspective

Postby Astus » Thu Jan 05, 2017 10:51 am

crazy-man wrote:Honen Shonin (Jodo-Shu), Shinran Shonin (Jodo-Shin-Shu), Myōan Eisai (Rinzai-Shu), Dogen Zenji (Soto-Shu) and Nichiren Daishonin (Nichiren-Shu) were former monks of the Tendai-Shu and i think that they took some elements from the teaching of the Tendai-Shu into their own teachings.


Honen established and Shinran followed the teaching of exclusive nenbutsu, so they have practically nothing to do with Tendai or Zen. Eisai had no heirs and he led a sort of ecumenical temple. Dogen rejected the Pure Land path, while Nichiren rejected both Pure Land and Zen.
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

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Astus
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Re: Pure Land teachings from a Zen perspective

Postby Astus » Thu Jan 05, 2017 10:53 am

Dharma Flower wrote:Thank you for these recommendations. Are there Zen Buddhists in the West who read and put into practice these Pure Land-related materials explained from a Zen perspective? It seems that Zen in the West might not always be in tune with the devotional practices found in Zen as practiced in Asia, even including Japan.


Mostly those who follow traditional Chinese and Vietnamese schools.
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"


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