Greetings from a Zen Pagan

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darumadarling
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Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by darumadarling »

Greetings, a lotus for you, a Buddha to be!

I'm an equal parts pagan and Zen Buddhist -- the two traditions I identify with most. I've spent some time at monasteries in the Thich Nhat Hanh tradition and study English, particularly medieval stuff, at UCLA. Hello :tongue: Lately I've been missing the format of a good ol' message board, thought I'd give this a shot.
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Ayu
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by Ayu »

Welcome to Dharma Wheel. :namaste:Have a good time here.
For the benefit and ease of all sentient beings. :heart:
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Thadral
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by Thadral »

Greetings!

This is my first post here. I was praticing a little bit zen in soto school in the past and I´m also interested in paganism. What kind of paganism do you have more interest? nordic? celtic?
darumadarling
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by darumadarling »

Thadral wrote: Sat Apr 18, 2020 4:49 pm Greetings!

This is my first post here. I was praticing a little bit zen in soto school in the past and I´m also interested in paganism. What kind of paganism do you have more interest? nordic? celtic?
Generally Celtic and Hellenistic influences. There's a small history of Buddhism in Ancient Greece/Alexandrian culture as well :smile:
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by DNS »

Welcome to DW!

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Grigoris
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by Grigoris »

darumadarling wrote: Sun Apr 19, 2020 7:08 am
Thadral wrote: Sat Apr 18, 2020 4:49 pm Greetings!

This is my first post here. I was praticing a little bit zen in soto school in the past and I´m also interested in paganism. What kind of paganism do you have more interest? nordic? celtic?
Generally Celtic and Hellenistic influences. There's a small history of Buddhism in Ancient Greece/Alexandrian culture as well :smile:
Hellenistic paganism???

Alexandrian culture???

:shrug:
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde
darumadarling
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by darumadarling »

Grigoris wrote: Sun Apr 19, 2020 7:31 pm
darumadarling wrote: Sun Apr 19, 2020 7:08 am
Thadral wrote: Sat Apr 18, 2020 4:49 pm Greetings!

This is my first post here. I was praticing a little bit zen in soto school in the past and I´m also interested in paganism. What kind of paganism do you have more interest? nordic? celtic?
Generally Celtic and Hellenistic influences. There's a small history of Buddhism in Ancient Greece/Alexandrian culture as well :smile:
Hellenistic paganism???

Alexandrian culture???

:shrug:
https://www.cs.mcgill.ca/~rwest/wikispe ... ddhism.htm
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Thadral
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by Thadral »

darumadarling wrote: Sun Apr 19, 2020 7:08 am
Thadral wrote: Sat Apr 18, 2020 4:49 pm Greetings!

This is my first post here. I was praticing a little bit zen in soto school in the past and I´m also interested in paganism. What kind of paganism do you have more interest? nordic? celtic?
Generally Celtic and Hellenistic influences. There's a small history of Buddhism in Ancient Greece/Alexandrian culture as well :smile:
Yes, this is really interesting!
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Grigoris
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by Grigoris »

Greco-Bactrian or Indo-Hellenic/Greek culture, not Alexandrian culture.

And what do you mean by Hellenistic influences? On your Buddhism? You practice the teachings of Pyrrho Of Elis? You are a Stoic?

Still waiting on the Hellenistic paganism thing...
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by fckw »

darumadarling wrote: Sun Apr 19, 2020 7:08 am Generally Celtic and Hellenistic influences. There's a small history of Buddhism in Ancient Greece/Alexandrian culture as well :smile:
That's not really precise, it was actually the other way round. Maybe there might have been some soldiers coming back from Asia bringing some Buddhist ideas back to ancient Greece (which was a cultural melting pot anyway due to being located on the trade route), but Buddhism never really got a foothold there.
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by Grigoris »

fckw wrote: Mon Apr 20, 2020 2:44 pm
darumadarling wrote: Sun Apr 19, 2020 7:08 am Generally Celtic and Hellenistic influences. There's a small history of Buddhism in Ancient Greece/Alexandrian culture as well :smile:
That's not really precise, it was actually the other way round. Maybe there might have been some soldiers coming back from Asia bringing some Buddhist ideas back to ancient Greece (which was a cultural melting pot anyway due to being located on the trade route), but Buddhism never really got a foothold there.
Yes it did, but not under the name "Buddhism":

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrrho

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrrhonism
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde
Malcolm
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by Malcolm »

Grigoris wrote: Mon Apr 20, 2020 2:55 pm
fckw wrote: Mon Apr 20, 2020 2:44 pm
darumadarling wrote: Sun Apr 19, 2020 7:08 am Generally Celtic and Hellenistic influences. There's a small history of Buddhism in Ancient Greece/Alexandrian culture as well :smile:
That's not really precise, it was actually the other way round. Maybe there might have been some soldiers coming back from Asia bringing some Buddhist ideas back to ancient Greece (which was a cultural melting pot anyway due to being located on the trade route), but Buddhism never really got a foothold there.
Yes it did, but not under the name "Buddhism":

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrrho

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrrhonism
Most interpretations of the information on Pyrrho's philosophy suggest that he claimed that reality is inherently indeterminate, which, in the view of Pyrrhonism described by Sextus Empiricus, would be considered a negative dogmatic belief.
This would suggest that Pyrrho was actually influenced by Jains, rather than by Buddhists. Indeterminacy is a key Jain tenet.
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by Grigoris »

Malcolm wrote: Mon Apr 20, 2020 4:31 pm
Most interpretations of the information on Pyrrho's philosophy suggest that he claimed that reality is inherently indeterminate, which, in the view of Pyrrhonism described by Sextus Empiricus, would be considered a negative dogmatic belief.
This would suggest that Pyrrho was actually influenced by Jains, rather than by Buddhists. Indeterminacy is a key Jain tenet.
From the fragments I have read (most of his theory comes to us second-hand) it seems that he was more a type of proto-Madhyamaka.
Academics believe he was influenced by the teachings found in the Atthakavagga Sutta Nipata. This, of course, does not preclude that he may have been influenced by Jains.
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde
Malcolm
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by Malcolm »

Grigoris wrote: Mon Apr 20, 2020 6:00 pm From the fragments I have read (most of his theory comes to us second-hand) it seems that he was more a type of proto-Madhyamaka.
Academics believe he was influenced by the teachings found in the Atthakavagga Sutta Nipata. This, of course, does not preclude that he may have been influenced by Jains.
Well, Gymnosophist (Naked philosophers) was a term which sprang form Greek encounters with Digambara Jains, since they went naked.
fckw
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by fckw »

Quite interesting indeed. From the Wiki-page I am not sure I'd equate Pyrrhonism with Buddhism, but there seem to exist some undeniable parallels. And yes, definitely also to Jainism, which obviously also shares quite a few similarities with older schools of Buddhism. Also, it seems we don't know how influental Pyrrhonism was as a whole to Greek philosophy, could be it was only few crazy guys or a significant movement. Do you have any more knowledge on those guys?
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

Post by Grigoris »

fckw wrote: Tue Apr 21, 2020 9:21 pm Quite interesting indeed. From the Wiki-page I am not sure I'd equate Pyrrhonism with Buddhism, but there seem to exist some undeniable parallels. And yes, definitely also to Jainism, which obviously also shares quite a few similarities with older schools of Buddhism. Also, it seems we don't know how influental Pyrrhonism was as a whole to Greek philosophy, could be it was only few crazy guys or a significant movement. Do you have any more knowledge on those guys?
Pyrrhon did not use the language of Ancient Indian Buddhists, that is for sure. But if you study it a bit you will find some interesting parallels.

He was one of the founders of (a huge influence on) of Skepticism, which spawned Ancient philosophers like Democritus and Socrates and more modern philosophers like Descartes, and Hume.

Which in effect is just a few few crazy guys. ;)
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde
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Re: Greetings from a Zen Pagan

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darumadarling wrote: Sat Apr 18, 2020 7:31 am Greetings, a lotus for you, a Buddha to be!

I'm an equal parts pagan and Zen Buddhist -- the two traditions I identify with most. I've spent some time at monasteries in the Thich Nhat Hanh tradition and study English, particularly medieval stuff, at UCLA. Hello :tongue: Lately I've been missing the format of a good ol' message board, thought I'd give this a shot.
Howdy. My daughter is finishing up at UCLA this quarter--remotely, of course.
I majored in English in a former life, myself, and it's still a hobbyhorse of mine. British (as opposed to just "English") art, literature, and culture. I've been learning Welsh as a hobby for a couple years, for instance. But I'm a confirmed (fairly) orthodox Tibetan Vajrayana practitioner.

What, more specifically, do you mean by "particularly medieval stuff?" Are we talking Bede? Beowulf? Chaucer and Middle English? The Mabinogi? Le Morte D'arthur?
དམ་པའི་དོན་ནི་ཤེས་རབ་ཆེ་བ་དང་།
རྟོག་གེའི་ཡུལ་མིན་བླ་མའི་བྱིན་རླབས་དང་།
སྐལ་ལྡན་ལས་འཕྲོ་ཅན་གྱིས་རྟོགས་པ་སྟེ།
དེ་ནི་ཤེས་རབ་ལ་ནི་ལོ་རྟོག་སེལ།།


"Absolute Truth is not an object of analytical discourse or great discriminating wisdom,
It is realized through the blessing grace of the Guru and fortunate Karmic potential.
Like this, mistaken ideas of discriminating wisdom are clarified."
- (Kyabje Bokar Rinpoche, from his summary of "The Ocean of Definitive Meaning")
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