The Mahamudra of Sakya Pandita, paper by Julia Stenzel

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kirtu
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The Mahamudra of Sakya Pandita, paper by Julia Stenzel

Post by kirtu » Tue Aug 15, 2017 7:27 pm

On Academia.edu, you will have to register to download it.

The Mahamudra of Sakya Pandita, Julia Stenzel, Indian International
Journal of Buddhist Studies
Volume 15 (2014)
Sakya Pandita Kunga Gyaltsen (Sa skya pandita kun dga‘ rgyal mtshan, 1182–1251) of the Sakya school of Tibetan Buddhism viewed Mahåmudrå practice as being solely a part of the Tantric practice path—a path to which disciples may be introduced only after having passed through the initiations and required stages of the Niruttarayogatantra. He criticised the non-Tantric Mahåmudrå approaches of Kagyü (Bka‘ brgyud) masters such as Gampopa (Sgam po pa, 1079-1153) and Lama Zhang Tsalpa (Bla ma
Zhang tshal pa, 1123-93). The controversy between representatives of the two schools has been discussed by Roger Jackson (1982) ,David Jackson (1990, 1994) , and others. Western scholarship has
been less concerned, however, with the positive statements of Sakya Pandita on Mahåmudrå, i.e. with the question of what a correct understanding of Mahåmudrå would be in his eyes. This fact is partly due to the secrecy with which the Sakya School handles Tantric texts. However, in a dialogue (dris lan) text in the collected works of the Sakya masters (Sa skya bka’’bum), Sakya Pandita gives a short account of the topic in response to questions posed by Tokden Gyan (Rtogs ldan rgyan). 1 This text, available from the Tibetan Buddhist Resource Center and as yet untranslated, 2 will serve as the basis for an analysis of Sakya Pandita‘s Mahåmudrå. His presentation will be supplemented by explanations drawn from A Clear Differentiations of the Three Codes, 3 and Taking the Result as the Path (Stearns 2006) . Since
controversies and debates have the advantage of clarifying divergent viewpoints by highlighting crucial differences, I will include a discussion of the Kagyü Mahåmudrå approaches that Sapan criticizes wherever it seems helpful in illuminating Sakya Pandita‘s standpoint. For this part of the research, I will rely on the Western scholarship mentioned previously. My analysis does not aim at justifying either side of the controversy. Both Sakya and Kagyü Schools have continuously taught their respective meditation systems for nearly a millennium, which I like to see as a proof that a significant number of individuals have found meaning in their divergent approaches. As Western scholars and practitioners explore Tibetan Buddhism, it is important to understand controversial positions as thoroughly as the secret content of the debated material allows, so as not to perpetuate a thousand year-old debate on the basis of partial information. It is my hope that this paper contributes to clarifying the position of Sakya Pandita in the Mahåmudrå controversy.
Kirt
Last edited by kirtu on Tue Aug 15, 2017 7:34 pm, edited 3 times in total.
Kirt's Tibetan Translation Notes

"Even if you practice only for an hour a day with faith and inspiration, good qualities will steadily increase. Regular practice makes it easy to transform your mind. From seeing only relative truth, you will eventually reach a profound certainty in the meaning of absolute truth."
Kyabje Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche.

"Only you can make your mind beautiful."
HH Chetsang Rinpoche

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Malcolm
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Re: The Mahamudra of Sakya Pandita, paper by Julia Stenzel

Post by Malcolm » Tue Aug 15, 2017 7:31 pm

This short text has been translated, more than once.

kirtu wrote:On Academia.edu, you will have to register to download it.

The Mahamudra of Sakya Pandita, Julia Stenzel, Indian International
Journal of Buddhist Studies
Volume 15 (2014)
Sakya Pandita Kunga Gyaltsen (Sa skya paˆ∂ita kun dga‘
rgyal mtshan, 1182–1251) of the Sakya school of Tibetan
Buddhism viewed Mahåmudrå practice as being solely a part of the
Tantric practice path—a path to which disciples may be introduced
only after having passed through the initiations and required stages
of the Niruttarayogatantra. He criticised the non-Tantric
Mahåmudrå approaches of Kagyü (Bka‘ brgyud) masters such as
Gampopa (Sgam po pa, 1079-1153) and Lama Zhang Tsalpa (Bla ma
Zhang tshal pa, 1123-93). The controversy between representatives
of the two schools has been discussed by Roger Jackson (1982) ,
David Jackson (1990, 1994) , and others. Western scholarship has
been less concerned, however, with the positive statements of
Sakya Pandita on Mahåmudrå, i.e. with the question of what a
correct understanding of Mahåmudrå would be in his eyes. This
fact is partly due to the secrecy with which the Sakya School
handles Tantric texts. However, in a dialogue (dris lan) text in the
collected works of the Sakya masters (Sa skya bka’’bum), Sakya
Pandita gives a short account of the topic in response to questions
posed by Tokden Gyan (Rtogs ldan rgyan). 1 This text, available
from the Tibetan Buddhist Resource Center and as yet
untranslated, 2 will serve as the basis for an analysis of Sakya
Pandita‘s Mahåmudrå. His presentation will be supplemented by
explanations drawn from A Clear Differentiations of the Three
Codes, 3 and Taking the Result as the Path (Stearns 2006) . Since
controversies and debates have the advantage of clarifying
divergent viewpoints by highlighting crucial differences, I will
include a discussion of the Kagyü Mahåmudrå approaches that
Sapan criticizes wherever it seems helpful in illuminating Sakya
Pandita‘s standpoint. For this part of the research, I will rely on the
Western scholarship mentioned previously. My analysis does not
aim at justifying either side of the controversy. Both Sakya and
Kagyü Schools have continuously taught their respective
meditation systems for nearly a millennium, which I like to see as a
proof that a significant number of individuals have found meaning
in their divergent approaches. As Western scholars and
practitioners explore Tibetan Buddhism, it is important to
understand controversial positions as thoroughly as the secret
content of the debated material allows, so as not to perpetuate a
thousand year-old debate on the basis of partial information. It is
my hope that this paper contributes to clarifying the position of
Sakya Pandita in the Mahåmudrå controversy.
Kirt
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kirtu
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Location: Baltimore, MD

Re: The Mahamudra of Sakya Pandita, paper by Julia Stenzel

Post by kirtu » Tue Aug 15, 2017 7:42 pm

Malcolm wrote:This short text has been translated, more than once.
Stenzel has her translation in an appendix as well. However the paper is a discussion of Sakya Pantita's view of Mahamudra, often in light of his "Three Codes".

Kirt
Kirt's Tibetan Translation Notes

"Even if you practice only for an hour a day with faith and inspiration, good qualities will steadily increase. Regular practice makes it easy to transform your mind. From seeing only relative truth, you will eventually reach a profound certainty in the meaning of absolute truth."
Kyabje Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche.

"Only you can make your mind beautiful."
HH Chetsang Rinpoche

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