Physiological suffering and implications for Buddhist path?

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Stefos
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Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2014 1:51 am

Re: Physiological suffering and implications for Buddhist path?

Post by Stefos » Mon Dec 25, 2017 4:09 am

SunWuKong wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 7:02 pm
The brain is can be reprogrammed. One example is when i cut the tendon to my thumb, the doctor used a tendon from my finger and transferred it. He told me the brain will make the change and reprogram itself. There's lots of examples how parts of the brain "assigned" to certain functions, how these functions can be reassigned to other areas. There's exceptions, too. Loss of one part of the brain may result in permanent loss of the function. It all depends. The science of how meditative or contemplative practices (horrible terminology here) affect brain function is still just emerging. One of the things that seems to happen is left/right brain synchronization. Think of this in yogic terms ida and pingala, and how it leads to activation of the shushuma. So this goes beyond merely healing or accepting paradigms, its creating a functionality where there was none before quite like it. To summarize, "Practice Changes Things"
This discussion is taking a "Krishnamurti-esque" turn.
I knew sooner or later it would.

This is very interesting.

In Buddhist texts and non-Buddhist texts, Kalapas are mentioned. The "Kalapic" effects of samatha, vipassana and Bare Attention, as it were, are not discussed in any Abhidhammic/Abhidharmic text I've heard of. Interesting right?

Suffice to agree with Krishnamurti that, ANY imposition of the will to change is only modification and not change!
Why?
When the "I" uses the will to get rid of the mind, it becomes the ego trying to kill itself, where the will is a direct aspect of the ego.

This is why ONLY Dzogchen and Mahamudra and the Bare attention of the Theras interests me.....that and tantric aspects like Chakras, Nadis, etc.

:anjali:
Stefos

SunWuKong
Posts: 301
Joined: Mon Nov 06, 2017 11:15 pm

Re: Physiological suffering and implications for Buddhist path?

Post by SunWuKong » Thu Dec 28, 2017 2:46 am

Stefos wrote:
Mon Dec 25, 2017 4:09 am
SunWuKong wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 7:02 pm
The brain is can be reprogrammed. One example is when i cut the tendon to my thumb, the doctor used a tendon from my finger and transferred it. He told me the brain will make the change and reprogram itself. There's lots of examples how parts of the brain "assigned" to certain functions, how these functions can be reassigned to other areas. There's exceptions, too. Loss of one part of the brain may result in permanent loss of the function. It all depends. The science of how meditative or contemplative practices (horrible terminology here) affect brain function is still just emerging. One of the things that seems to happen is left/right brain synchronization. Think of this in yogic terms ida and pingala, and how it leads to activation of the shushuma. So this goes beyond merely healing or accepting paradigms, its creating a functionality where there was none before quite like it. To summarize, "Practice Changes Things"
This discussion is taking a "Krishnamurti-esque" turn.
I knew sooner or later it would.

This is very interesting.

In Buddhist texts and non-Buddhist texts, Kalapas are mentioned. The "Kalapic" effects of samatha, vipassana and Bare Attention, as it were, are not discussed in any Abhidhammic/Abhidharmic text I've heard of. Interesting right?

Suffice to agree with Krishnamurti that, ANY imposition of the will to change is only modification and not change!
Why?
When the "I" uses the will to get rid of the mind, it becomes the ego trying to kill itself, where the will is a direct aspect of the ego.

This is why ONLY Dzogchen and Mahamudra and the Bare attention of the Theras interests me.....that and tantric aspects like Chakras, Nadis, etc.

:anjali:
Stefos
It's possible to be so passive that change becomes impossible, in which case: right concentration, and right effort, etc. aren't from the ego, but from the Dharma, and become catalyst for change

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Stefos
Posts: 104
Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2014 1:51 am

Re: Physiological suffering and implications for Buddhist path?

Post by Stefos » Thu Dec 28, 2017 5:13 am

SunWuKong wrote:
Thu Dec 28, 2017 2:46 am
"Practice Changes Things"
It's possible to be so passive that change becomes impossible, in which case: right concentration, and right effort, etc. aren't from the ego, but from the Dharma, and become catalyst for change
[/quote]

Dzogchen, Mahamudra and Bare attention are all in the context of the Noble 8 fold path already.

Nothing comes from the Dharma..........Your mind's nature IS the Dharma Body.

Nothing leaves the Dharma either......Your mind's nature IS the Dharma Body.

Lord Buddha's Dharma pointed to the "Uncreated, Unborn, Undying, Unbecoming" and "That which is unconditioned"
Which means..........well, words can't describe it!

:anjali:
Stefos

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