How the Sugar Industry Shifted the Blame to Fat

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Cianan
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How the Sugar Industry Shifted the Blame to Fat

Postby Cianan » Mon Jun 12, 2017 3:53 pm

This is old news now, but certainly worth sharing for those who may have missed it:
https://nytimes.com/2016/09/13/well/eat/how-the-sugar-industry-shifted-blame-to-fat.html
The sugar industry paid scientists in the 1960s to play down the link between sugar and heart disease and promote saturated fat as the culprit instead, newly released historical documents show.

The internal sugar industry documents, recently discovered by a researcher at the University of California, San Francisco, and published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, suggest that five decades of research into the role of nutrition and heart disease, including many of today’s dietary recommendations, may have been largely shaped by the sugar industry.


A year and a half ago, some time before this came to light, I personally switched to a (high-fat, medium-protein, very low-carb) ketogenic diet, a diet used clinically for almost a century. Breaking my fast every day with a "Bulletproof coffee" with two tablespoons of grass-fed butter and a tablespoon of MCT oil or coconut oil, I've been eating fat as my primary source of energy, including a lot of butter and saturated fat. Nuts are also a staple in my diet. According to our government's dietary guidelines I should be in the worst condition of my life, but the exact opposite has happened. I've never been leaner or more vital, and my blood is better than ever.

Studies and anecdotal evidence are certainly out there to back the ketogenic diet and foods such as grass-fed butter. I looked past the ordinary notion of healthy eating shaped in many ways by the likes of the sugar industry only to be completely disillusioned.

Anyone else around here with experience with ketogenic and high-fat diets? :smile:

Soma999
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Re: How the Sugar Industry Shifted the Blame to Fat

Postby Soma999 » Mon Jun 19, 2017 10:03 am

Refined food are not so good. I will give two exemples with sugar and oil.

- Take sugar. First you have sugar cane, and you extract unrefined sugar. You remove molasses and you have brown sugar. You refined it more and you have white sugar.

Unrefined sugar is good for teeth. Studies have shown (dr Begin for exemple - nothing to do with beghin say...) that this sugar is good for the teeth.

But refined, white sugar is the cause number one of tooth decay. And it has many more problems on human health. It's in fact a poison. If you like going to the dentist, by all means, take a lot of white sugar. Even brushing your teeth won't protect them sufficiently

If you have problems with tooth decay, you can switch to unrefined sugar. Also, Xylitol (birch sugar) is very good for teeth. The bacterium that provoques tooth decay feeds on Xylitol, and can't digest it so it is removed. Really, taking Xylitol is very good for oral health.

- Considering oil, it's the same. A little google research bring this site :

http://www.happilyunprocessed.com/the-b ... -eat-them/

Coconut oil (unrefined) is one of the best oil one can take.

If someone like butter, he/she may really benefits from using ghee or even making it using butter. It's really beneficial.

It's a buddhist forum so i won't add much, but if your health is something that interests you, those 2 things can really brings positive change and a great improvement in one's life.

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Cianan
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Re: How the Sugar Industry Shifted the Blame to Fat

Postby Cianan » Thu Jun 22, 2017 6:58 pm

I can agree to the virtue of unprocessed food! Raw honey, for example, is without a doubt a far superior food to table sugar. However, to see what is different about a fat-based diet, you must understand that sugar is sugar in the body whether it's from bread, an onion or candy. It will raise insulin and cortisol levels, decrease testosterone and human growth hormone, and in the case of fructose, put strain on the liver.

The idea with a fat-based, and therefore ketone-based diet, is that you avert all the negative effects of carb-loading. Insulin sensitivity remains entirely stable, you no longer have your cortisol levels going up and down and you're not at the mercy of your blood sugar. Ketones are 40% more oxygen efficient to burn than glucose, too. That much less stress on the body will surely add up! Also, on a diet that induces ketosis, neurons will fire differently from when you burn sugar, believe it or not, and so this diet has proven effective in treating various neurological conditions over the past century.

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Grigoris
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Re: How the Sugar Industry Shifted the Blame to Fat

Postby Grigoris » Thu Jun 22, 2017 8:20 pm

Cianan wrote:I can agree to the virtue of unprocessed food! Raw honey, for example, is without a doubt a far superior food to table sugar. However, to see what is different about a fat-based diet, you must understand that sugar is sugar in the body whether it's from bread, an onion or candy. It will raise insulin and cortisol levels, decrease testosterone and human growth hormone, and in the case of fructose, put strain on the liver.

The idea with a fat-based, and therefore ketone-based diet, is that you avert all the negative effects of carb-loading. Insulin sensitivity remains entirely stable, you no longer have your cortisol levels going up and down and you're not at the mercy of your blood sugar. Ketones are 40% more oxygen efficient to burn than glucose, too. That much less stress on the body will surely add up! Also, on a diet that induces ketosis, neurons will fire differently from when you burn sugar, believe it or not, and so this diet has proven effective in treating various neurological conditions over the past century.
A ketogenic diet is used for medical purposes in specific maladies (particularly child epilepsy) , it is not recommended as a normal/daily diet as it can have all sorts of adverse side effects. And, just in case you didn't know: many sugars are ketones too.
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde

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Cianan
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Re: How the Sugar Industry Shifted the Blame to Fat

Postby Cianan » Thu Jun 22, 2017 10:58 pm

Grigoris wrote:
Cianan wrote:I can agree to the virtue of unprocessed food! Raw honey, for example, is without a doubt a far superior food to table sugar. However, to see what is different about a fat-based diet, you must understand that sugar is sugar in the body whether it's from bread, an onion or candy. It will raise insulin and cortisol levels, decrease testosterone and human growth hormone, and in the case of fructose, put strain on the liver.

The idea with a fat-based, and therefore ketone-based diet, is that you avert all the negative effects of carb-loading. Insulin sensitivity remains entirely stable, you no longer have your cortisol levels going up and down and you're not at the mercy of your blood sugar. Ketones are 40% more oxygen efficient to burn than glucose, too. That much less stress on the body will surely add up! Also, on a diet that induces ketosis, neurons will fire differently from when you burn sugar, believe it or not, and so this diet has proven effective in treating various neurological conditions over the past century.
A ketogenic diet is used for medical purposes in specific maladies (particularly child epilepsy) , it is not recommended as a normal/daily diet as it can have all sorts of adverse side effects. And, just in case you didn't know: many sugars are ketones too.

It seems to be increasingly evident such a diet is beneficial for a wide range of things, including autism, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, brain injury, stroke and obesity—and this study on obesity was long-term:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28623167
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2367001/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2367001/
Contrary to what you suggest, there are actually quite a number of potential applications yielding some impressive results.

As to its viability as an everyday diet, our liver is handily capable of generating the glucose necessary for the brain from dietary protein in gluconeogenesis, and it's very good at it:
Emily Deans, M.D wrote:When I was taught about biochemical fuel-burning, I was taught that glucose was “clean” and ketones were “smokey.” That glucose was clearly the preferred fuel for our muscles for exercise and definitely the key fuel for the brain. Except here’s the dirty little secret about glucose – when you look at the amount of garbage leftover in the mitochondria, it is actually less efficient to make ATP from glucose than it is to make ATP from ketone bodies! A more efficient energy supply makes it easier to restore membranes in the brain to their normal states after a depolarizing electrical energy spike occurs, and means that energy is produced with fewer destructive free radicals leftover.

It also seems clear that, historically, humans have absolutely relied on ketosis: it was a common state critical to survival, and our bodies were good at it. They still are. Constant carb-loading is a relatively recent innovation for humanity as is agriculture. Admittedly, long-term studies are few, but the studies that do exist do not seem to be able to show any major negative side effects but demonstrate some clear benefits. For those who experience some negative effects on a deep ketogenic diet do extremely well with an occasional carb refeed.

I'm not here to advocate for deep ketosis for every day here on out, but based on the myriad health problems that people are increasingly experiencing in the modern day—obesity, heart disease and Alzheimer's, for example—and the mounting scientific and anecdotal evidence for dietary ketosis' therapeutic effects on these health problems, I think it's worth looking into. Many people have given it a shot, including me, and had it work well. Our bodies are clearly well-adapted to it, equipped with efficient ketone factories.

However, I'm not sure that I follow when you say that there are sugars that supply ketones. Ketones are a product of breaking down fat. Do you have any examples?

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Grigoris
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Re: How the Sugar Industry Shifted the Blame to Fat

Postby Grigoris » Fri Jun 23, 2017 7:52 am

Look, ketogenic metabolism has some positive qualities, that is undeniable... BUT it's essential function is for the human body to be able to survive prolonged fasts (ie when food is not available at all) and periods where carbohydrates are not available.

A normal diet includes fats AND carbohydrates, in proper proportions, for energy.

Anything else is just pointlessly tormenting yourself. Yet another food fad.

But, of course, it's your body, feel free to mistreat it any way you like.
However, I'm not sure that I follow when you say that there are sugars that supply ketones. Ketones are a product of breaking down fat. Do you have any examples?
I did not say sugars supply ketones, I said that there are sugars that ARE ketones. Basically this means that some fat metabolism results in sugars (that are also ketones) for energy AND there are naturally occurring (ie not the product of metabolism) ketose sugars too.
http://www.livestrong.com/article/361217-examples-of-ketose-sugars/
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde

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Cianan
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Re: How the Sugar Industry Shifted the Blame to Fat

Postby Cianan » Fri Jun 23, 2017 4:21 pm

To-the-point. I like it.

I won't try to convince you of anything, but it is admittedly difficult to reconcile your conservative position with the experiences of a rather vast ketogenic diet community, including some doctors and professional athletes. It's no longer terra incognita at this point. People who have used it even more long-term than I regularly verify its safety with their doctor and can vouch for it. I certainly have enjoyed its benefits. You say torment, but the only noticeable negative side-effect is that I need more water. :tongue:

I respect your wariness. To say it's a fad, though—to me, it seems this is just opening up to a bright future with how much promising research for a litany of diseases and health conditions has come out and is yet to come. Fads tend not to have so many favorable peer-reviewed scientific papers, don't you think?
:namaste:


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