Backyard Gardening

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TharpaChodron
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Re: Home grown

Post by TharpaChodron » Sat Mar 31, 2018 3:01 am

shaunc wrote:
Wed Nov 13, 2013 11:45 am
I'm stealing a thread from our sister site & hoping it will take off. It's spring time in Australia & the Melbourne cup has been run & won, which means in our area it's time to put in the tomatoes. The vegetable patch isn't looking too bad this year. 3 jap pumpkins, 4 zucchini, 6 egg plant, 2 x 2 metre rows of silver beet, 8 hot chilli plants & 12 tomatoes. The tomatoe seedlings were the last things I planted, last Friday & it's rained pretty solidly since then. I got them cheap as their leaves were yellowing from being root bound in the punnett. My luck held with the weather, I just gave them all a bit of a haircut & planted them out & the rain did the rest. We also keep 5 chooks down the back, I run them on the deep litter method & they keep us in eggs as well as supply good compost for the garden, when the plants are a bit more established in a month or so I'll let them out to free range in the garden, as they help keep the insects & weeds down. What do the rest of you do in your garden to put some food on the table. It can also help with Dana as I always grow more than we need so I've got a bit to give away to the neighbours & occassionally to the monks at the Thai temple in town.
Well, maybe it's time to revive a dead thread. It's spring, gardening time! We're building our backyard garden from scratch, including raised beds for vegetables and herbs. I wonder how gardening enhances everyone's Buddhist practice here, and how it relates to your understanding of the Dharma. Gardening is a very wonderful practice to me. Pulling weeds is a veritable exercise in Dharma, as well as planting seeds. :)

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Ayu
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by Ayu » Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:25 pm

I just canceled my work, because I'm not physically fit. We have no spring yet. But it will start soon.

Gardening is a very good means for to become grounded. Soil is an intelligent organism. Mother earth's skin. :smile: And plants are wise beings I believe. Maybe they are even real Bodhisattvas, because they share their bodies for us in complete serenity.
They provide oxigen, shadow, rain... They are our mothers.
I have decided to stick with love.
Hate is too great a burden to bear.
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Kunga Lhadzom
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by Kunga Lhadzom » Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:32 pm

I WONDER WHY Buddha forbade the monks from digging in the dirt, and eating seeds ?

BTW...i love digging in the dirt & eating seeds :spy:

And i love your analogy Ayu !




Answer to my question:

Because there are sentient beings living in the dirt & it kills them & upsets them...
And the LIFE-FORCE is in the seeds ....so we are killing the life force in the seeds ( ? )
The Universe flowing through my veins...stars falling from my eyes......rocks rolling in my head...lemon juice dripping down my chin....

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Ayu
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by Ayu » Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:59 pm

No seeds? Isn't that a fruitarian fairytale? Rice is seeds. :smile:
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Kim O'Hara
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by Kim O'Hara » Sun Apr 01, 2018 12:36 am

Ayu wrote:
Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:59 pm
No seeds? Isn't that a fruitarian fairytale? Rice is seeds. :smile:
There are some extreme vegetarians who won't eat seeds but I don't think the idea was conceivable in the Buddha's society. As you say, Ayu, rice is seeds. Seeds - grains - have always been the staple food of pre-industrial agriculture everywhere, ever since farming took over from hunter-gathering.

:namaste:
Kim

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TharpaChodron
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by TharpaChodron » Sun Apr 01, 2018 2:04 am

Ayu wrote:
Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:25 pm
I just canceled my work, because I'm not physically fit. We have no spring yet. But it will start soon.

Gardening is a very good means for to become grounded. Soil is an intelligent organism. Mother earth's skin. :smile: And plants are wise beings I believe. Maybe they are even real Bodhisattvas, because they share their bodies for us in complete serenity.
They provide oxigen, shadow, rain... They are our mothers.
Yes, many plants seem to give of themselves to benefit being quite selflessly. I know Darwin might disagree, but it's interesting how plants make themselves appealing to bees and birds in order to spread their seed. Quite amazing, I think.

I've been admiring some black painted raised beds I see in some German backyards. We have a deck in back which we painted black, I was thinking of matching the beds, BUT, I'm concerned the paint used to treat the wood might not be so good for vegetables. That might be out of your field of expertise?

I hope Spring comes your way soon!

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TharpaChodron
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by TharpaChodron » Sun Apr 01, 2018 2:05 am

Kim O'Hara wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 12:36 am
Ayu wrote:
Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:59 pm
No seeds? Isn't that a fruitarian fairytale? Rice is seeds. :smile:
There are some extreme vegetarians who won't eat seeds but I don't think the idea was conceivable in the Buddha's society. As you say, Ayu, rice is seeds. Seeds - grains - have always been the staple food of pre-industrial agriculture everywhere, ever since farming took over from hunter-gathering.

:namaste:
Kim
What on earth can they eat!? That's very extreme.

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Kunga Lhadzom
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by Kunga Lhadzom » Sun Apr 01, 2018 2:58 am

TharpaChodron wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 2:04 am
I'm concerned the paint used to treat the wood might not be so good for vegetables.
Watch some YT videos on this Japanese technique to burn wood....instead of painting black... :









I'm going to be doing this for a floor in a house ....


:namaste:
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Ayu
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by Ayu » Sun Apr 01, 2018 8:43 am

TharpaChodron wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 2:04 am
Ayu wrote:
Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:25 pm
I just canceled my work, because I'm not physically fit. We have no spring yet. But it will start soon.

Gardening is a very good means for to become grounded. Soil is an intelligent organism. Mother earth's skin. :smile: And plants are wise beings I believe. Maybe they are even real Bodhisattvas, because they share their bodies for us in complete serenity.
They provide oxigen, shadow, rain... They are our mothers.
Yes, many plants seem to give of themselves to benefit being quite selflessly. I know Darwin might disagree, but it's interesting how plants make themselves appealing to bees and birds in order to spread their seed. Quite amazing, I think.

I've been admiring some black painted raised beds I see in some German backyards. We have a deck in back which we painted black, I was thinking of matching the beds, BUT, I'm concerned the paint used to treat the wood might not be so good for vegetables. That might be out of your field of expertise?

I hope Spring comes your way soon!
I never heard of painting the wood black. :shrug: And I agree with your concern. Black paint should not get in touch with young vegetables, if they are not only decoration.
We had a "cold frame": https://www.mein-schoener-garten.de/gar ... bauen-4216

I also heard people put an oldfashioned lightbulb inside as heating system in cold nights. But normally the sunrays through the closed window are enough to keep the box warm. With this system you can start growing one or two months earlier.
I have decided to stick with love.
Hate is too great a burden to bear.
- Martin Luther King, Jr. -

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TharpaChodron
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by TharpaChodron » Sun Apr 01, 2018 8:49 am

Kunga Lhadzom wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 2:58 am
TharpaChodron wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 2:04 am
I'm concerned the paint used to treat the wood might not be so good for vegetables.
Watch some YT videos on this Japanese technique to burn wood....instead of painting black... :









I'm going to be doing this for a floor in a house ....


:namaste:
I've never heard of that technique, very cool.

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TharpaChodron
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by TharpaChodron » Sun Apr 01, 2018 9:00 am

Ayu wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 8:43 am
TharpaChodron wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 2:04 am
Ayu wrote:
Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:25 pm
I just canceled my work, because I'm not physically fit. We have no spring yet. But it will start soon.

Gardening is a very good means for to become grounded. Soil is an intelligent organism. Mother earth's skin. :smile: And plants are wise beings I believe. Maybe they are even real Bodhisattvas, because they share their bodies for us in complete serenity.
They provide oxigen, shadow, rain... They are our mothers.
Yes, many plants seem to give of themselves to benefit being quite selflessly. I know Darwin might disagree, but it's interesting how plants make themselves appealing to bees and birds in order to spread their seed. Quite amazing, I think.

I've been admiring some black painted raised beds I see in some German backyards. We have a deck in back which we painted black, I was thinking of matching the beds, BUT, I'm concerned the paint used to treat the wood might not be so good for vegetables. That might be out of your field of expertise?

I hope Spring comes your way soon!
I never heard of painting the wood black. :shrug: And I agree with your concern. Black paint should not get in touch with young vegetables, if they are not only decoration.
We had a "cold frame": https://www.mein-schoener-garten.de/gar ... bauen-4216

I also heard people put an oldfashioned lightbulb inside as heating system in cold nights. But normally the sunrays through the closed window are enough to keep the box warm. With this system you can start growing one or two months earlier.
It's more of an aesthetic thing, I think? .. no purpose other than looking sort of modern. By May we're usually getting into the 100 degrees, so that's not really a concern here. My region produces a large amount of agriculture products precisely because of the hot and sunny climate. :)

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Ayu
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by Ayu » Sun Apr 01, 2018 4:05 pm

Can you provide a photo? I can't imagine what it is.
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TharpaChodron
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by TharpaChodron » Sun Apr 01, 2018 9:28 pm

Ayu wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 4:05 pm
Can you provide a photo? I can't imagine what it is.
I was having no luck posting a picture, so here's a link. It looks like the article addresses my concerns, too.

https://www.gardenista.com/posts/trend- ... rden-beds/

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Ayu
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by Ayu » Sun Apr 01, 2018 10:23 pm

Aaah, raised beds. Hochbeete. :lol: A new vocabulary.

It looks very nicely like zen style.
But painted wood can't stand the weather. It will look very different next year. :tongue:
So, it's not worth it. i assume.
I think brown wood looks better, if you know it's healthy.
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Hate is too great a burden to bear.
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Kim O'Hara
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by Kim O'Hara » Mon Apr 02, 2018 12:09 am

Ayu wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 10:23 pm
Aaah, raised beds. Hochbeete. :lol: A new vocabulary.

It looks very nicely like zen style.
But painted wood can't stand the weather. It will look very different next year. :tongue:
So, it's not worth it. i assume.
I think brown wood looks better, if you know it's healthy.
I'm only an amateur gardener but I'm an well trained home handyman and live in a climate not too different from California so here's my take on it, FWIW.

Paint or other finishes serve as both decoration and protection for wood.
Most wood needs some protection if it's going to be constantly in contact with dirt, as the inside and bottom of the raised bed will be. Protection from rain, wind and sun is less important but will extend its life.
Paint or oil will protect the wood, but charring it won't.
Paint is designed to stay on the wood. If it does that and doesn't leach into the soil, there's no contamination of the garden bed at all.
Even if there is some leaching, it is most likely to be insignificant compared to the pollution that is already in the soil and falls from the sky every day, unless you're in an exceptionally good location. Anywhere in cities or near highways, there is lead from petrol. Anywhere near (most) commercial farming operations there is drift from herbicide and insecticide spraying. Anywhere with a history of either of these will have residual pollution. Etc, etc.
Bottom line: Don't worry too much. If you want the bed to last a long time, find the best finish you can and go ahead. If not, use the most rot-proof wood you can find and let it age gracefully.

:juggling:
Kim

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TharpaChodron
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by TharpaChodron » Mon Apr 02, 2018 1:06 am

Good points Kim and Ayu. You're both right, I bet.

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Ayu
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by Ayu » Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:55 pm

But I wonder how this black burned wood would last. :spy:
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Kunga Lhadzom
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by Kunga Lhadzom » Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:09 pm

Ayu wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:55 pm
But I wonder how this black burned wood would last. :spy:
Pre-burning the surface like this actually makes the wood more resistant to fire, a serious concern in 1700s Japan (when the technique was commonly used), as all houses then were made out of wood. But the developers of this technique also discovered that it made the wood more resistant to both rot and pests. More recently it's been discovered that the charred wood is also UV-resistant.
As a result, a shou sugi ban finish can reportedly last for some 80 to 100 years, virtually maintenance-free. (This is not only easier on the wallet, but allows you to participate in the global trend of letting future generations worry about fixing up your stuff. Score!)
http://www.core77.com/posts/46575/A-Che ... It-on-Fire
The Universe flowing through my veins...stars falling from my eyes......rocks rolling in my head...lemon juice dripping down my chin....

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by Kim O'Hara » Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:50 pm

Kunga Lhadzom wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:09 pm
Ayu wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:55 pm
But I wonder how this black burned wood would last. :spy:
Pre-burning the surface like this actually makes the wood more resistant to fire, a serious concern in 1700s Japan (when the technique was commonly used), as all houses then were made out of wood. But the developers of this technique also discovered that it made the wood more resistant to both rot and pests. More recently it's been discovered that the charred wood is also UV-resistant.
As a result, a shou sugi ban finish can reportedly last for some 80 to 100 years, virtually maintenance-free. (This is not only easier on the wallet, but allows you to participate in the global trend of letting future generations worry about fixing up your stuff. Score!)
http://www.core77.com/posts/46575/A-Che ... It-on-Fire
Perhaps I was too quick to dismiss the protective function of shou sugi ban. :emb:
This page - https://permaculturenews.org/2016/12/05 ... sing-fire/ - says it works well. It links to this page - http://shousugiban.com/overview/ which describes the technique in detail.
Neither of them says just how the protection works, but two possibilities come to mind. One is that heat hardens wood (e.g. Australian aborigines used to harden spear points by heating them in the coals of their camp-fires). The other is that carbon is going to be less nutritious and therefore less attractive to living things (fungus or insect) than the original wood. :thinking:
But I also see both sites saying that the charred wood is normally coated with oil to help preserve it "even longer". Paint is oil + pigment so we're back to painted wood anyway - almost.
:juggling:
I guess I'm not entirely convinced but at this point I think it might be worth a try.
But I would use the oil - especially on the inside of the garden bed frame.

:namaste:
Kim

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Kunga Lhadzom
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Re: Backyard Gardening

Post by Kunga Lhadzom » Mon Apr 02, 2018 11:18 pm

Kim O'Hara wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:50 pm
the charred wood is normally coated with oil to help preserve it "even longer".
I think that oil coating is optional...i myself would not coat it if used for vegetable garden. Not only that, being untreated it would be better for the earth, (like trees in the forest, burning from a forest fire)....
The Universe flowing through my veins...stars falling from my eyes......rocks rolling in my head...lemon juice dripping down my chin....

https://drunklotus.blog

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