Dangers of Marijuana

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Tenma
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Re: Dangers of Marijuana

Post by Tenma » Sun Feb 24, 2019 6:03 pm

Here's what my AP Psychology textbook(Myer's Psychology) stated:

"For 5000 years, hemp has been cultivated for its fiber. The leaves and flowers of this plant, which are sold as marijuana, contain THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol). Whether smoked (getting to the brain in about 7 seconds) or eaten (causing its peak concentration to be reached at a slower, unpredictable rate), THC produces a mix of effects. Synthetic marijuana (also called K2 or Spice) mimics THC. Its harmful side effects, which can include agitation and hallucinations, led to its ingredient becoming illegal under the U.S. Synthetic Drug Abuse Prevention Act of 2012.

Marijuana is a difficult drug to classify. It is a mild hallucinogen, amplifying sensitivity to colors, sounds, tastes, and smells. But like alcohol, marijuana relaxes, disinhibits, and may produce a euphoric high. Both alcohol and marijuana impair the motor coordination, perceptual skills, and reaction time necessary for safely operating an automobile or other machine. "THC causes animals to misjudge events," reported Ronald Siegel (1990, p. 163). "Pigeons wait too long to respond to buzzers or lights that tell them food is available for brief periods; and rats turn the wrong way in mazes.

Marijuana and alcohol also differ. The body eliminates alcohol within hours. THC and its by-products linger in the body for a week or more, which means that regular users experience less abrupt withdrawal and may achieve a high with small amounts of the drug than would be needed by occasional users. This is contrary to the usual path of tolerance, in which repeat users need to take larger doses to feel the same effect.

A user's experience can vary with the situation. If the person feels anxious or depressed, using marijuana may intensify these feelings. The more often the person uses marijuana, especially during adolescence and in today's stronger, purified form, the greater the risk of anxiety or depression (Bambico et al., 2010; Hall, 2006; Murray et al., 2007). Daily use bodes a worse outcome than infrequent users.

Marijuana also disrupts memory formation and interferes with immediate recall of information learned only a few minutes before. Such cognitive effects outlast the period of smoking (Messinis et al., 2006). Heavy adult use for over 20 years is associated with a shrinkage of brain areas that process memories and emotions (Yücel et al., 2008). Prenatal exposure through maternal marijuana use impairs brain development (Berghuis et al., 2007; Huizink & Mulder, 2006).

To free up resources to fight crime, some states and countries have passed laws legalizing the possession of small quantities of marijuana. In some cases, legal medical marijuana use has been granted to relieve the pain and nausea associated with diseases such as AIDS, glaucoma, and cancer (Munsey, 2010; Watson et al., 2000). In such cases, the Institute of Medicine recommends delivering the THC with medical inhalers. Marijuana smoke, like cigarette smoke, is toxic and can cause cancer, lung damage, and pregnancy complications."

Here's the evidence. Don't shoot the messenger. Thank you.

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SonamTashi
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Re: Dangers of Marijuana

Post by SonamTashi » Mon Feb 25, 2019 8:56 am

Tenma wrote:
Sun Feb 24, 2019 6:03 pm
Here's what my AP Psychology textbook(Myer's Psychology) stated:

"For 5000 years, hemp has been cultivated for its fiber. The leaves and flowers of this plant, which are sold as marijuana, contain THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol). Whether smoked (getting to the brain in about 7 seconds) or eaten (causing its peak concentration to be reached at a slower, unpredictable rate), THC produces a mix of effects. Synthetic marijuana (also called K2 or Spice) mimics THC. Its harmful side effects, which can include agitation and hallucinations, led to its ingredient becoming illegal under the U.S. Synthetic Drug Abuse Prevention Act of 2012.

Marijuana is a difficult drug to classify. It is a mild hallucinogen, amplifying sensitivity to colors, sounds, tastes, and smells. But like alcohol, marijuana relaxes, disinhibits, and may produce a euphoric high. Both alcohol and marijuana impair the motor coordination, perceptual skills, and reaction time necessary for safely operating an automobile or other machine. "THC causes animals to misjudge events," reported Ronald Siegel (1990, p. 163). "Pigeons wait too long to respond to buzzers or lights that tell them food is available for brief periods; and rats turn the wrong way in mazes.

Marijuana and alcohol also differ. The body eliminates alcohol within hours. THC and its by-products linger in the body for a week or more, which means that regular users experience less abrupt withdrawal and may achieve a high with small amounts of the drug than would be needed by occasional users. This is contrary to the usual path of tolerance, in which repeat users need to take larger doses to feel the same effect.

A user's experience can vary with the situation. If the person feels anxious or depressed, using marijuana may intensify these feelings. The more often the person uses marijuana, especially during adolescence and in today's stronger, purified form, the greater the risk of anxiety or depression (Bambico et al., 2010; Hall, 2006; Murray et al., 2007). Daily use bodes a worse outcome than infrequent users.

Marijuana also disrupts memory formation and interferes with immediate recall of information learned only a few minutes before. Such cognitive effects outlast the period of smoking (Messinis et al., 2006). Heavy adult use for over 20 years is associated with a shrinkage of brain areas that process memories and emotions (Yücel et al., 2008). Prenatal exposure through maternal marijuana use impairs brain development (Berghuis et al., 2007; Huizink & Mulder, 2006).

To free up resources to fight crime, some states and countries have passed laws legalizing the possession of small quantities of marijuana. In some cases, legal medical marijuana use has been granted to relieve the pain and nausea associated with diseases such as AIDS, glaucoma, and cancer (Munsey, 2010; Watson et al., 2000). In such cases, the Institute of Medicine recommends delivering the THC with medical inhalers. Marijuana smoke, like cigarette smoke, is toxic and can cause cancer, lung damage, and pregnancy complications."

Here's the evidence. Don't shoot the messenger. Thank you.
Why shoot the messenger in this case? What's your point? How familiar are you with drugs, legal and illegal, in general? Note, I'm not asking if you have done them, just whether you are familiar with the dangers of other common drugs.

Because everything in the quote from your AP book is very, very, very mild. The risk of cancer mentioned at the end can be entirely avoided by using methods other than smoking. Nothing in that quote shows that Marijuana is particularly dangerous, especially when compared to other legal drugs, like tobacco, alcohol and opiates (not to mention other illegal drugs like cocaine, PCP or meth). Marijuana has numerous therapeutic uses, briefly including pain, inflammation, IBS, nausea (including in cancer patients receiving chemo), and anorexia (as well as to stimulate appetite in cancer patients). Like any drug, it should be used carefully, but in any case it is nowhere near as dangerous, even under heavy and prolonged use, as any of the drugs I mentioned above.

In addition, it is relatively non-addictive. Your quote even demonstrates one of the reasons why:

"regular users experience less abrupt withdrawal and may achieve a high with small amounts of the drug than would be needed by occasional users. This is contrary to the usual path of tolerance, in which repeat users need to take larger doses to feel the same effect."

In regards to chemical dependency, the less abrupt withdrawal means that a user doesn't have to take the drug every day just to feel normal, or indeed just to survive, as can be the case with alcohol and opiate addicts. It also allows for smaller doses, whereas drugs like opiates require larger and larger doses, just to take effect. In the world of opiate addiction, this has led to drug dealers pushing their product as more and more powerful, even bragging that their product is deadly. In response, addicts literally try to find the most potent, possibly deadly product they can get their hands on. When addicts start dying from OD, the word gets around and more and more addicts start trying to get their hands on the same stuff that killed the others. Why? Because they need something more and more powerful every single time they use, just to get the high they're chasing.

Marijuana does not do this. In fact marijuana and other psychedelics have (more and more often as of late) been shown to be effective in treating addiction, including opiate addiction. There's absolutely zero reason to be alarmed by or to try to spread fear of marijuana when it is radically safer than pretty much any other drug in our society. The fear is totally misplaced. Does that mean there are no side effects or problems? Of course not. It is a drug. All drugs have side effects. But marijuana's side effects are ridiculously mild compared to other drugs. There's no way we should let the mild side effects of marijuana prevent us from replacing opiates and other dangerous drugs when appropriate. The US has a major opiate epidemic going on right now, with tens of thousands of people dying. Most addicts first became addicted to opiates from prescriptions they got from a doctor. Marjiuana can help with that.
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Johnny Dangerous
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Re: Dangers of Marijuana

Post by Johnny Dangerous » Mon Feb 25, 2019 9:36 pm

People can definitely become dependent on Marijuana. People can become dependent and change their physiology/neurology even without a physical substance in play - compulsive gambling for example.

It's true that marijuana does not have the kind of physical withdrawal effects that drugs like opiates, alcohol and benzos do, but neither does meth, so that means little.

People who are heavy daily smokers can really screw up their brain's normal dopamine and seratonin etc. systems and most certainly can have withdrawals, they just don't get dopesick, aren't in danger of seizure, etc. It also really is bad for young brains to be stoned all the time, most of what comes from that textbook blurb is accurate, as far as I know.

Indeed, compared to opiates it's much less risky for pain relief, but it can certainly be a drug of abuse, and as much as I think the OP article is junk, I don't wanna swing to far in the other direction and pretend using marijuana is completely, harmless, for plenty of people it is not. Additionally, it simply isn't as effective for serious pain in a lot of people. We can never replace heavy duty pain relief drugs with it because it doesn't do that well enough. We can allow it to be available as alternative though, for people with more moderate pain.

It is however ridiculous that marijuana is still a schedule 1 drug, and the silly reefer madness style attitudes about it are a relic best left in the past.

As far as familiarity, I smoked a ton of pot for years, from an early age, and am an addiction counselor. So while I'm not a doctor or anything, I do have a small bit of education on neuropharmacology, and a lot of actual experience with drug users, their patterns, and the various patterns of dysfunction and pain you see with different drugs.
There's no hoarding what has vanished,
No piling up for the future;
Those who have been born are standing
Like a seed upon a needle.

-Guhatthaka-suttaniddeso

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javier.espinoza.t
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Re: Dangers of Marijuana

Post by javier.espinoza.t » Wed Feb 27, 2019 3:56 am

i know exactly 0 people who consume drugs and is happy in the common sense nor achieved any spiritual attinment.

must say also that being addict to something is a ticket to preta condition.

For example, think on a person who smokes tobacco as an habit, every day this person smokes tobacco for let's say 20 years. one day his person develops cancer and after a month this person dies. while in the intermediate state this person is normaly bounded to strive for recover his normal life, but this person cannot recover his normal life, so this hunger makes this person to sink into desire, taking for good what is not this person will be not satisfied for a long time until maybe someone offers some tobacco smell and put end to his suffering.

many people who makes such connection to drugs in a recreative way develops this tendency of hunger, and when this people can't obtain his recreational entertainments they become a hungry ghost even in human form.

according to everything i have learn, this is what i understand.

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