Facilitating breaking the law - but not actually breaking it?

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KiwiNFLFan
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Facilitating breaking the law - but not actually breaking it?

Post by KiwiNFLFan » Mon Mar 25, 2019 2:43 pm

I'm wondering what the Buddhist view is on doing something that is not illegal itself but by doing so, someone else is breaking the law.

Here in Seoul, there are a lot of street stalls selling food and clothing. From what I understand, most of them are illegal (health and safety standards and all that). I'm guessing that the owner is the only one breaking the law and the only one who will get punished.

Bearing this in mind, what do you think the Buddhist ethical view would be on buying things from these stalls, since by selling you the product, the owner is breaking the law (even though you might not be)?

stevie
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Re: Facilitating breaking the law - but not actually breaking it?

Post by stevie » Mon Mar 25, 2019 4:06 pm

Buddhist ethics and wordly laws are not the same. Ethical conduct may entail breaking the law and not breaking the law may damage/undermine ethical conduct and not breaking the law and ethical conduct may be perfectly harmonious.
However your question seems to subordinate buddhist ethical conduct to worldly law which is not appropriate.

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jake
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Re: Facilitating breaking the law - but not actually breaking it?

Post by jake » Mon Mar 25, 2019 4:52 pm

stevie wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 4:06 pm
Buddhist ethics and wordly laws are not the same. Ethical conduct may entail breaking the law and not breaking the law may damage/undermine ethical conduct and not breaking the law and ethical conduct may be perfectly harmonious.
However your question seems to subordinate buddhist ethical conduct to worldly law which is not appropriate.
Can you provide a source that explains this in greater detail?

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Johnny Dangerous
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Re: Facilitating breaking the law - but not actually breaking it?

Post by Johnny Dangerous » Mon Mar 25, 2019 5:48 pm

If there is some ethical violation (such as supporting theft etc.) this might be a problem. Simply patronizing something that isn't properly following administrative laws is pretty ethically neutral.

Not understanding where you see a particular connection to Buddhist ethics, rather than just administrative worldly concerns. Is there stolen merchandise or something?

It almost sounds more like a Confucian question more than a Buddhist one.

So, I would say that unless there is something really unethical going with the stalls themselves, it's a pretty simple ethical question that you can solve yourself, with little or not appeal to any other authority.
"...if you think about how many hours, months and years of your life you've spent looking at things, being fascinated by things that have now passed away, then how wonderful to spend even five minutes looking into the nature of your own mind."

-James Low

stevie
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Re: Facilitating breaking the law - but not actually breaking it?

Post by stevie » Mon Mar 25, 2019 6:52 pm

jake wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 4:52 pm
stevie wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 4:06 pm
Buddhist ethics and wordly laws are not the same. Ethical conduct may entail breaking the law and not breaking the law may damage/undermine ethical conduct and not breaking the law and ethical conduct may be perfectly harmonious.
However your question seems to subordinate buddhist ethical conduct to worldly law which is not appropriate.
Can you provide a source that explains this in greater detail?
I've never come across sources or precepts that refer to worldly laws/regulations as such.

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