Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

If you're new to the forum or new to Buddhism, this is the best place for your questions. Responses require moderator approval before they are visible.
bcol01
Posts: 42
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2016 10:20 pm

Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by bcol01 » Mon Dec 26, 2016 4:02 am

Is there any other place where the Eternal Buddha is mentioned besides the Lotus Sutra? Thanks guys! :) :namaste:

User avatar
KarmaOcean
Posts: 63
Joined: Sun Nov 27, 2016 5:42 am
Location: English

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by KarmaOcean » Mon Dec 26, 2016 4:47 pm

Lotus sutra only mentions the word "eternal" twice:
“It is just like the grasses, trees, shrubs, and herbs that do not know their
own natures, whether they are superior, mediocre, or inferior. Yet the Tathā-gata knows the teachings of one aspect and character, the character of lib-eration, dispassion, cessation, complete nirvana, and eternal tranquility which ultimately leads to emptiness.
The Bhagavat is truly extraordinary!
He sat tranquil for ten intermediate kalpas
With his body and limbs immobile.
His mind was always calm and never distracted.
He has attained ultimate, eternal tranquility,
And is firmly established
In the incorruptible Dharma.
Tathāgatagarbha sūtras speak about the eternal:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tath%C4%8 ... tras#Texts

User avatar
Queequeg
Global Moderator
Posts: 4183
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2012 3:24 pm

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Queequeg » Mon Dec 26, 2016 6:52 pm

Mahayana Mahaparinirvana Sutra.
“Once you have given up the ghost, everything follows with dead certainty, even in the midst of chaos.”
-Henry Miller

"Language is the liquid that we're all dissolved in.
Great for solving problems, after it creates the problems."
-Modest Mouse

Kunzang
Posts: 171
Joined: Thu May 05, 2011 3:10 am

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Kunzang » Mon Dec 26, 2016 8:37 pm

Queequeg wrote:Mahayana Mahaparinirvana Sutra.
Citation please?

User avatar
Queequeg
Global Moderator
Posts: 4183
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2012 3:24 pm

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Queequeg » Mon Dec 26, 2016 10:17 pm

Kunzang wrote:
Queequeg wrote:Mahayana Mahaparinirvana Sutra.
Citation please?
Not sure what you mean. You want page numbers?

Quick start - see Nirvanasutra.net

But take note that translation is not the best and the guy who runs the page... Well take with a pinch of salt.
“Once you have given up the ghost, everything follows with dead certainty, even in the midst of chaos.”
-Henry Miller

"Language is the liquid that we're all dissolved in.
Great for solving problems, after it creates the problems."
-Modest Mouse

Kunzang
Posts: 171
Joined: Thu May 05, 2011 3:10 am

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Kunzang » Mon Dec 26, 2016 10:49 pm

Queequeg wrote:
Kunzang wrote:
Queequeg wrote:Mahayana Mahaparinirvana Sutra.
Citation please?
Not sure what you mean. You want page numbers?

Quick start - see Nirvanasutra.net

But take note that translation is not the best and the guy who runs the page... Well take with a pinch of salt.
Yeah actual quotes would be nice. I read the Yamamoto translation that the nirvanasutra.net is based off of about 25 years ago and was unimpressed with its quality. I don't recall it talking of an eternal buddha. Eternal was one of the four descriptors (self, pure, bliss and eternal) for tathagatagarbha. And the way I understood the explanations for the four is that they're all synonyms for emptiness and that it's a parodying critique of non-buddhist satchitananda and atman. But like I it said it was about 25 years ago and that translation is unreliable and my memory of it is hazy.

User avatar
Queequeg
Global Moderator
Posts: 4183
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2012 3:24 pm

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Queequeg » Tue Dec 27, 2016 5:20 am

Sorry, I don't have the time. Go to the link and look if it's important to you. I was answering the OP.
“Once you have given up the ghost, everything follows with dead certainty, even in the midst of chaos.”
-Henry Miller

"Language is the liquid that we're all dissolved in.
Great for solving problems, after it creates the problems."
-Modest Mouse

User avatar
Zhen Li
Posts: 1482
Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:15 am
Location: Canada

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Zhen Li » Tue Dec 27, 2016 6:29 am

It is important to distinguish between śaśvat, eternal, and what the Tathāgata is said to be. Eternalism is a wrong view, so is annhilationalism. These are both refuted in the Nirvana Sutra (Taishō Vol. 12, 374, page 410b).

However, the Buddha is without beginning, middle, or end. This is the standard Mahāyāna Buddha. He is uncreated/self-existent, causeless and without beginning, middle, or end. The Ratnagotravibhāga is a decent place to get a summary of the Mahāyāna conception of the Buddha.

yo buddhatvamanādimadhyanidhanaṃ śāntaṃ vibuddhaḥ svayaṃ
buddhvā cābudhabodhanārthamabhayaṃ mārgaṃ dideśa dhruvam /
tasmai jñānakṛpāsivajravaradhṛgduḥkhaṅkuraikacchide
nānādṛggahanopagūḍhavimatiprākārabhettre namaḥ // 4 //
asaṃskṛtamanābhogamaparapratyayoditam /
buddhatvaṃ jñānakāruṇyaśaktyupetaṃ dvayārthavat // 5 //

The first line is essentially saying that the Buddha is beyond time, is peace, and self-awakened - consequently he shows the path through the thicket of views, and homage is paid to him.

The second line says that Buddhahood is uncompounded and doesn't arise due to external conditions, and so forth.

The Lotus Sutra establishes that the Buddha was not really awakened in his life in the Saha world, and did not really enter final cessation. This is because the essence of the Buddha surpasses that.

In this sense, the Buddha is "eternal," but the Buddha is not a dharma, so the notion really does not apply. We can use the term as a convention, if it helps.

User avatar
Queequeg
Global Moderator
Posts: 4183
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2012 3:24 pm

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Queequeg » Tue Dec 27, 2016 2:38 pm

Zhen Li wrote:It is important to distinguish between śaśvat, eternal, and what the Tathāgata is said to be. Eternalism is a wrong view, so is annhilationalism. These are both refuted in the Nirvana Sutra (Taishō Vol. 12, 374, page 410b).

However, the Buddha is without beginning, middle, or end. This is the standard Mahāyāna Buddha. He is uncreated/self-existent, causeless and without beginning, middle, or end. The Ratnagotravibhāga is a decent place to get a summary of the Mahāyāna conception of the Buddha.

yo buddhatvamanādimadhyanidhanaṃ śāntaṃ vibuddhaḥ svayaṃ
buddhvā cābudhabodhanārthamabhayaṃ mārgaṃ dideśa dhruvam /
tasmai jñānakṛpāsivajravaradhṛgduḥkhaṅkuraikacchide
nānādṛggahanopagūḍhavimatiprākārabhettre namaḥ // 4 //
asaṃskṛtamanābhogamaparapratyayoditam /
buddhatvaṃ jñānakāruṇyaśaktyupetaṃ dvayārthavat // 5 //

The first line is essentially saying that the Buddha is beyond time, is peace, and self-awakened - consequently he shows the path through the thicket of views, and homage is paid to him.

The second line says that Buddhahood is uncompounded and doesn't arise due to external conditions, and so forth.

The Lotus Sutra establishes that the Buddha was not really awakened in his life in the Saha world, and did not really enter final cessation. This is because the essence of the Buddha surpasses that.

In this sense, the Buddha is "eternal," but the Buddha is not a dharma, so the notion really does not apply. We can use the term as a convention, if it helps.
:good:
“Once you have given up the ghost, everything follows with dead certainty, even in the midst of chaos.”
-Henry Miller

"Language is the liquid that we're all dissolved in.
Great for solving problems, after it creates the problems."
-Modest Mouse

User avatar
Coëmgenu
Posts: 984
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:35 pm
Location: Whitby, Ontario

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Coëmgenu » Tue Dec 27, 2016 3:59 pm

Kunzang wrote:
Queequeg wrote:
Kunzang wrote:
Citation please?
Not sure what you mean. You want page numbers?

Quick start - see Nirvanasutra.net

But take note that translation is not the best and the guy who runs the page... Well take with a pinch of salt.
Yeah actual quotes would be nice. I read the Yamamoto translation that the nirvanasutra.net is based off of about 25 years ago and was unimpressed with its quality. I don't recall it talking of an eternal buddha. Eternal was one of the four descriptors (self, pure, bliss and eternal) for tathagatagarbha. And the way I understood the explanations for the four is that they're all synonyms for emptiness and that it's a parodying critique of non-buddhist satchitananda and atman. But like I it said it was about 25 years ago and that translation is unreliable and my memory of it is hazy.
The Buddha said: "O good man! The Tathāgata, already, since innumerable, boundless innumerable aeons ago, has had no body supported by food and illusion, and he has no body where there yet remains the result of illusion. He is the Eternal, the Dharma Body, and the Adamantine Body.

O good man! One who has not yet seen Buddhatā is called the illusion-body, the body supported by various kinds of food, and the body where there yet remains the result of illusion
(Mahāyānamahāparinirvāṇasūtra II)

Then Dharmarajaputra Mañjuśrī praised Cunda and said: "Well spoken, well spoken, O good man! You have already done what will beget you an endless life. You well know that the Tathāgata is one eternal and unchanging, and is uncreated. You now well shield the Tathāgata’s created-form existence. One who encounters fire covers his body with clothing because of repentance. This good mind gains him birth in Trāyastriṃśa Heaven. He becomes Brahma and a chakravartin, and he does not get born into the unfortunate realms and thus will always enjoy peace. That is how things will go with you. As you well shield the created form of the Tathāgata, you will in the days to come gain the 32 signs of perfection, the 80 minor marks of excellence, and the 18 characteristics peculiar solely to the Buddha. Your life will become endless, with no more bonds of samsara."
(ibid. II)

Then the Buddha said to all the bhikṣus: "Hear me well, hear me well! Now, you mention the case of an intoxicated person. This refers to knowledge, but not the signification. What do I mean by signification? The intoxicated person sees the sun and moon, which do not move, but he thinks they do. The same is the case with beings. As all illusion and ignorance overhang [the mind], the mind turns upside down and takes Self for non-Self, Eternal for non-Eternal, Purity as non-Pure, and Bliss as sorrow. Overhung by illusion, this thought arises. Though this though arises, the meaning is not gained [realised]. This is as in the case of the intoxicated person who takes what does not move as moving. 'The Self' signifies the Buddha; 'the Eternal' signifies the Dharmakāya; ’Bliss’ signifies Nirvāṇa, and 'the Pure' signifies Dharma. Bhikṣus, why is it said that one who has the idea of a Self is arrogant and haughty, traversing round Saṃsāra? Bhikṣus, although you might say, ’We also cultivate impermanence, suffering, and non-Self, these three kinds of cultivation have no real value/ meaning. I shall now explain the excellent three ways of cultivating Dharma.

To think of suffering as Bliss and to think of Bliss as suffering, is perverse Dharma;
To think of the impermanent as the Eternal and to think of the Eternal as impermanent is perverse Dharma;
To think of the non-Self as the Self and to think of the Self as non-Self is perverse Dharma;
To think of the impure as the Pure and to think of the Pure as impure is perverse Dharma.

Whoever has these four kinds of perversion, that person does not know the correct cultivation of dharmas. Bhikṣus, you give rise to the idea of Bliss with regard to phenomena associated with suffering; the idea of Eternity with regard to phenomena associated with impermanence; the idea of the Self with regard to phenomena without Self; and the idea of Purity with regard to phenomena that are impure.

Both the mundane and also the supramundane have the Eternal, Bliss, the Self, and Purity.
(ibid. II)

There are literally tons of relevant quotes that either directly refer to the Primordial Buddha or are predicated on the notion of one.

There is also the Mahāyānabrahmajālasūtra:
At that time Vairocana Buddha, greatly elated, manifested the
samādhi of space-penetrating illumination of the eternally-abiding Dharma-body which is the essential nature and original source of becoming Buddha, displaying it to the great multitude.
(Mahāyānabrahmajālasūtra, Roll 1, section B, subsection iii)

The radiant adamantine precepts are the source of all buddhas, the origin of all bodhisattvas, the seed of buddha nature. All sentient beings without exception have the Buddha nature. All [those who have] mentation, consciousness, form, and mind- who have these feelings and these minds, are all encompassed by these Buddha-nature precepts.

It is precisely because of these ever present causes [in the form of the precepts], that there is without fail always an abiding Dharma body.
(Mahāyānabrahmajālasūtra, Roll 3, section C, "Exhortation")
神足示現者,
世尊隨其所應,而示現入禪定正受,陵虛至東方,作四威儀,
行、住、坐、臥,入火三昧,出種種火光,青、黃、赤、白、
紅、頗梨色,水火俱現, 或身下出火,身上出水,身上出火,
身下出水,周圓四方亦復如是。

Dharma Flower
Posts: 868
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2016 9:03 am
Contact:

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Dharma Flower » Tue Dec 27, 2016 9:24 pm

As a former Tendai monk, Shinran understood Amida and the Eternal Buddha of the Lotus Sutra as the same being. He referred to Amida as a Buddha more ancient than kalpas countless as particles, which is a direct reference to the lifespan chapter of the Lotus Sutra.

User avatar
Coëmgenu
Posts: 984
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:35 pm
Location: Whitby, Ontario

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Coëmgenu » Tue Dec 27, 2016 10:20 pm

Dharma Flower wrote:As a former Tendai monk, Shinran understood Amida and the Eternal Buddha of the Lotus Sutra as the same being. He referred to Amida as a Buddha more ancient than kalpas countless as particles, which is a direct reference to the lifespan chapter of the Lotus Sutra.
Do you happen to have citations for this? A couple of us posters here remember having read somewhere that a certain group of Buddhists believed Amitābha to be the Primordial Buddha, but none of us can remember, necessarily, exactly where, aside from in Jikai's post here.
神足示現者,
世尊隨其所應,而示現入禪定正受,陵虛至東方,作四威儀,
行、住、坐、臥,入火三昧,出種種火光,青、黃、赤、白、
紅、頗梨色,水火俱現, 或身下出火,身上出水,身上出火,
身下出水,周圓四方亦復如是。

Dharma Flower
Posts: 868
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2016 9:03 am
Contact:

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Dharma Flower » Tue Dec 27, 2016 10:53 pm

Coëmgenu wrote:
Dharma Flower wrote:As a former Tendai monk, Shinran understood Amida and the Eternal Buddha of the Lotus Sutra as the same being. He referred to Amida as a Buddha more ancient than kalpas countless as particles, which is a direct reference to the lifespan chapter of the Lotus Sutra.
Do you happen to have citations for this? A couple of us posters here remember having read somewhere that a certain group of Buddhists believed Amitābha to be the Primordial Buddha, but none of us can remember, necessarily, exactly where, aside from in Jikai's post here.
This is where the quote comes from:
Jōdo Wasan 55

It is taught that ten kalpas have now passed
Since Amida attained Buddhahood,
But he seems a Buddha more ancient
Than kalpas countless as particles.
http://redzambala.com/buddhism/pure-lan ... inran.html

User avatar
Zhen Li
Posts: 1482
Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:15 am
Location: Canada

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Zhen Li » Tue Dec 27, 2016 10:56 pm

I do not mean to obfuscate or frustrate this discussion, but if you are discussing the use of terminology in primary sources, you really need to be using the primary languages, not translations into English, which unfortunately, much of the time, are uncritical glosses or interpretations.

User avatar
Coëmgenu
Posts: 984
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:35 pm
Location: Whitby, Ontario

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Coëmgenu » Wed Dec 28, 2016 12:01 am

Zhen Li wrote:I do not mean to obfuscate or frustrate this discussion, but if you are discussing the use of terminology in primary sources, you really need to be using the primary languages, not translations into English, which unfortunately, much of the time, are uncritical glosses or interpretations.
If you are fluent in classical Chinese please correct my citations by cross-referencing them at CBETA if you are able and have the time.
神足示現者,
世尊隨其所應,而示現入禪定正受,陵虛至東方,作四威儀,
行、住、坐、臥,入火三昧,出種種火光,青、黃、赤、白、
紅、頗梨色,水火俱現, 或身下出火,身上出水,身上出火,
身下出水,周圓四方亦復如是。

User avatar
Zhen Li
Posts: 1482
Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:15 am
Location: Canada

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Zhen Li » Wed Dec 28, 2016 12:38 am

Coëmgenu wrote:
Zhen Li wrote:I do not mean to obfuscate or frustrate this discussion, but if you are discussing the use of terminology in primary sources, you really need to be using the primary languages, not translations into English, which unfortunately, much of the time, are uncritical glosses or interpretations.
If you are fluent in classical Chinese please correct my citations by cross-referencing them at CBETA if you are able and have the time.
I can if you provide the citations.

Quotes in English without the Taishō page numbers are not helpful for these purposes.

User avatar
Coëmgenu
Posts: 984
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:35 pm
Location: Whitby, Ontario

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Coëmgenu » Sun Jan 01, 2017 7:54 am

Zhen Li wrote:
Coëmgenu wrote:
Zhen Li wrote:I do not mean to obfuscate or frustrate this discussion, but if you are discussing the use of terminology in primary sources, you really need to be using the primary languages, not translations into English, which unfortunately, much of the time, are uncritical glosses or interpretations.
If you are fluent in classical Chinese please correct my citations by cross-referencing them at CBETA if you are able and have the time.
I can if you provide the citations.

Quotes in English without the Taishō page numbers are not helpful for these purposes.
I can't track all of the quotes down as of the moment, my poor grasp on Chinese being a factor in that, but I found what I believe to be the primary language source text for the quotes from the Mahāyānabrahmajālasūtra.
爾時、盧舍那佛、卽大歡喜、現虛空光體性本原成佛常住法身三昧、示諸大衆。
At that time Vairocana Buddha, greatly elated, manifested the samādhi of space-penetrating illumination of the eternally-abiding Dharmabody which is the essential nature and original source of becoming Buddha, displaying it to the great multitude.
and
光明金剛寶戒、是一切佛本源、一切菩薩本源、佛性種子。一切衆生、皆有佛
性。一切意識色心、是情是心、皆入佛性戒中。當當常有因故、有當當常住法身。
如是十波羅提木叉、出於世界。是法戒、是三世一切衆生、頂戴受持。吾今當爲
此大衆、重說十無盡藏戒品。是一切衆生戒、本源自性淸淨。
The radiant adamantine precepts are the source of all buddhas, the origin of all bodhisattvas, the seed of buddha nature. All sentient beings without exception have the Buddha nature. All [those who have] mentation, consciousness, form, and mind—who have these feelings and these minds, are all encompassed by these Buddha-nature precepts. It is precisely because of these ever present causes [in the form of the precepts], that there is without fail always an abiding Dharma body. In this way, these ten prātimokṣas appear in the world, and these Dharma rules are received and upheld with reverence by all sentient beings of the three times. I will now once again recite the Chapter of the Ten Inexhaustible Precepts Treasury for this great assembly. These are the precepts for all sentient beings, whose
original self-nature is pure.
Do these seem relatively well represented in the translation?
神足示現者,
世尊隨其所應,而示現入禪定正受,陵虛至東方,作四威儀,
行、住、坐、臥,入火三昧,出種種火光,青、黃、赤、白、
紅、頗梨色,水火俱現, 或身下出火,身上出水,身上出火,
身下出水,周圓四方亦復如是。

User avatar
Zhen Li
Posts: 1482
Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:15 am
Location: Canada

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Zhen Li » Mon Jan 02, 2017 8:12 am

In the first quote, the word that is being translated as "eternally" is "常住," the Sanskrit equivalents of which Hirakawa's dictionary (421) gives as nitya, sthita, nitya-sthita, śāśvata; avasthita, kūṭa-stha, dhruva, nityatā, nityatva, nityam, etc.

In other words, this is not a case where a strict English (or Sanskrit) equivalent exists and the choice of words is really up to the discretion of the translator. I wouldn't be opposed to using "eternal."

User avatar
Minobu
Posts: 1647
Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2016 6:57 pm

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Minobu » Mon Jan 02, 2017 6:58 pm

you have no idea what a home run this was for me to read....thank you...thank you....thank you
I now look at the Buddha compleletly differently...in one big bam!!!!
Zhen Li wrote:
The first line is essentially saying that the Buddha is beyond time, is peace, and self-awakened - consequently he shows the path through the thicket of views, and homage is paid to him.

The second line says that Buddhahood is uncompounded and doesn't arise due to external conditions, and so forth.

The Lotus Sutra establishes that the Buddha was not really awakened in his life in the Saha world, and did not really enter final cessation. This is because the essence of the Buddha surpasses that.
.
but this confuses me...
Zhen Li wrote: ," but the Buddha is not a dharma,.
This might be off topic
but can you explain this statement to me...if it is possable..


is that like????
everything in this saha world is produced from Dharma..It's all Dharma ...but the Buddha is (for lack of understanding the use of the next word could be misleading) comes from outside the saha world. ????


look i'm trying here...

User avatar
Coëmgenu
Posts: 984
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:35 pm
Location: Whitby, Ontario

Re: Is the "Eternal Buddha" mentioned anywhere else besides the Lotus Sutra?

Post by Coëmgenu » Mon Jan 02, 2017 8:18 pm

Minobu wrote:this confuses me...
Zhen Li wrote: ," but the Buddha is not a dharma,.
This might be off topic
but can you explain this statement to me...if it is possable..

is that like????
everything in this saha world is produced from Dharma..It's all Dharma ...but the Buddha is (for lack of understanding the use of the next word could be misleading) comes from outside the saha world. ????

look i'm trying here...
In the Sthaviravāda and Sarvāstivāda schools, nirvāṇa is considered a special class of dharma, an unconditioned dharma (abyākatā dharmapratyisambhidā). That doesn't really pertain directly to answering the question of "Is nirvāṇa/buddhahood a dharma or not", but it is an interesting aside.

As far as I know, in the overall Lotus-Sūtra tradition (Tiāntái, etc, perhaps Nichiren Buddhism too), just as in the Sthaviravāda-Sarvāstivāda, nirvāṇa is considered an unconditioned dharma, as in, "the unconditioned dharmakāya" that is the "Primordial/Unconditioned Buddha". Am I not correct in regards to this?

Tiāntái interpenetrational doctrine also becomes highly suspect if neither the Buddha-Realm, the Dharmakāya, nor the Pure Land atop Gṛdhrakūṭa (Lotus Sutra 16) is not an unconditioned element (dhātu) of all dharmas.
神足示現者,
世尊隨其所應,而示現入禪定正受,陵虛至東方,作四威儀,
行、住、坐、臥,入火三昧,出種種火光,青、黃、赤、白、
紅、頗梨色,水火俱現, 或身下出火,身上出水,身上出火,
身下出水,周圓四方亦復如是。

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests