The death of Shakyamuni Buddha's mortal human body

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well wisher
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The death of Shakyamuni Buddha's mortal human body

Post by well wisher » Wed Jan 29, 2020 7:54 pm

Many different sources has provided consistent account of how Shkamuni Buddha has died a long time ago, several thousands years ago: He ate his late meal offering from a layperson / blacksmith named Chunda. Then he fell violently ill and weak, and then he gave his last sermons to the gathering of Bhikkus/monks, before passing away in Mahaparinirvana.
Shkayamuni's human body has died long ago, shedding hist mortal coil. but many Buddhist say that his spirit and teaching lives on at this world.

Anyways, feel free to share different accounts or other more detailed versions regarding Shkyamuni Buddha's mortal body death, or any dissensions otherwise, if any other sources or other versions exists.

Example sources:
https://www.nichirenlibrary.org/en/dic/Content/S/110

Shakyamuni died at age eighty. The year before his death, he stayed at Gridhrakūta (Eagle Peak) near Rājagriha. Then he set out on his last journey, proceeding northward across the Ganges River to Vaishālī. He spent the rainy season in Beluva, a village near Vaishālī. During this retreat he became seriously ill, but recovered and continued to preach in many villages. Eventually he came to a place called Pāvā in Malla. There he again became ill after eating a meal prepared as an offering by the village blacksmith, Chunda. Despite his pain, he continued his journey until he reached Kushinagara, where in a grove of sal trees he calmly lay down and spoke his last words. He admonished his disciples, saying: “You must not think that your teacher’s words are no more, or that you are left without a teacher. The teachings and precepts I have expounded to you shall be your teacher.” His final words are said to have been, “Decay is inherent in all composite things. Work out your salvation with diligence.” His body was received by the Mallas of Kushinagara and cremated seven days later. The ashes were divided into eight parts, and eight stupas were erected to enshrine them. Two more stupas were built to house the vessel used in the cremation and the ashes of the fire. In the same year, the First Buddhist Council was held in the Cave of the Seven Leaves near Rājagriha to compile Shakyamuni’s teachings.
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https://www.quora.com/When-and-how-did- ... Buddha-die
- Kratu Nandan, studied Advaita Vedanta at Student of Vedanta

Die’ is not a word to be used in the case of enlightened beings like Buddha.

His final departure is called ‘Mahaparinirvana’ - The Great Final Release.

On his final day, at the age of 80, accompanied by Ananda (his cousin and chief disciple) and a number of bhikkus (mendicants), he arrived at a place called Pava.

A blacksmith at Pava, by name Chunda, came to know of Buddha’s arrival, and wanted to offer him bhiksha (food offered to monks). With great reverence and delight, he prayed to the Tathagatha (Buddha) to accept his bhiksha; Buddha agreed to it. Chunda offered him sukara maddava - a sweet dish. There is huge a debate here as to whether it was pork, or a dish made of mushrooms gathered with the help of pigs; Sukara in Sanskrit - Pali means pig.

Whichever it be, it was offered to Buddha first; he ate it, and was taken terribly ill. He asked Ananda to bury the remaining portion of the dish in the ground. Chunda was very agitated and guilt-stricken, but Buddha consoled him saying that it was not his fault.
Despite being severely ill, Buddha, with the party of bhikkus, managed to arrive at a place called Kushinara. He was very weak, and his disciples began wailing in grief. He consoled them, gave some final instructions to Ananda, as to what should be the conduct of bhikkus after his passing away; he instructed the bhikkus to be earnest in their efforts to seek the Truth.

The Buddha then gave up his mortal coil and entered the sphere of infinite consciousness, which is beyond perception and non-perception.
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http://www.chinabuddhismencyclopedia.co ... php/Chunda

Chunda
[純陀] (Skt, Pali; Jpn Junda)

A blacksmith in Pava Village in northern India who offered Shakyamuni Buddha his last meal before his death. According to the Long Agama Sutra , when Shakyamuni was visiting Pava Village on the day before he entered nirvana, Chunda heard him preach the teachings. Moved and delighted, Chunda invited the Buddha and his monks to his home and had a special meal prepared for them. After leaving Chunda's house, the Buddha proceeded to Kushinagara, where he died in a grove of sal trees.
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https://www.rigpawiki.org/index.php?title=Chunda
Chunda (Pali: Cunda) was a blacksmith who invited Buddha Shakyamuni and his disciples to eat a meal (either mushrooms or pork) at his house in Pava. The Buddha had a sense of foreboding about the food and asked that only he be served the meal, and that the rest of the food be buried. Soon afterwards, the Buddha was struck down by serious dissentry. Chunda, filled with remorse, pleaded with the Buddha not to pass away into nirvana. However, the Buddha insisted that Chunda should feel no remorse, "because", he said, "the person who offers the Buddha his last meal gains tremendous merit."

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Aemilius
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Re: The death of Shakyamuni Buddha's mortal human body

Post by Aemilius » Thu Jan 30, 2020 10:04 am

Here is a map of the Buddha's last tour and of His last walk on foot to Kushinara. He cannot have been very "weak", because He was able to make this journey. During it He gave His last talks or sermons to the supporters that had gathered in these places and towns. The audiences included laity, monks, nuns, and outsiders that were interested in His last message.
https://www.ancient-buddhist-texts.net/ ... t-Tour.htm
svaha
"All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.
They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
Sarvē mānavāḥ svatantrāḥ samutpannāḥ vartantē api ca, gauravadr̥śā adhikāradr̥śā ca samānāḥ ēva vartantē. Ētē sarvē cētanā-tarka-śaktibhyāṁ susampannāḥ santi. Api ca, sarvē’pi bandhutva-bhāvanayā parasparaṁ vyavaharantu."
Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 1. (in english and sanskrit)

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well wisher
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Re: The death of Shakyamuni Buddha's mortal human body

Post by well wisher » Thu Jan 30, 2020 5:13 pm

Aemilius wrote:
Thu Jan 30, 2020 10:04 am
Here is a map of the Buddha's last tour and of His last walk on foot to Kushinara. He cannot have been very "weak", because He was able to make this journey. During it He gave His last talks or sermons to the supporters that had gathered in these places and towns. The audiences included laity, monks, nuns, and outsiders that were interested in His last message.
https://www.ancient-buddhist-texts.net/ ... t-Tour.htm
Well, "modern standards" cannot be used to measure "past standards". Walk that much long of a distance cannot be seen as "weak" by today's standards.
Expectations and standards change over time after all - bias tend to be unreliable yard sticks, especially when greed or hatred are involved.

Shakyamuni Buddha's last messages are still very inspirational to many people to this date.

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Aemilius
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Re: The death of Shakyamuni Buddha's mortal human body

Post by Aemilius » Fri Jan 31, 2020 2:03 pm

Anandajoti had on his site also a map showing the stages of the Buddha's walk on the very last day of this last journey, including the places where he stopped to rest and other interesting details. However he has removed it from his site, for some reason? Apparently it was based on the commentaries of the Parinibbana sutta.

I have always found the Mahayana Mahaparinirvana sutra very inspirational; http://www.nirvanasutra.net/convenient/ ... e_2007.pdf
svaha
"All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.
They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
Sarvē mānavāḥ svatantrāḥ samutpannāḥ vartantē api ca, gauravadr̥śā adhikāradr̥śā ca samānāḥ ēva vartantē. Ētē sarvē cētanā-tarka-śaktibhyāṁ susampannāḥ santi. Api ca, sarvē’pi bandhutva-bhāvanayā parasparaṁ vyavaharantu."
Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 1. (in english and sanskrit)

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