Qigong and Buddhism

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Nosta
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Qigong and Buddhism

Post by Nosta » Mon Mar 06, 2017 10:19 pm

I am curious about Qigong. So, maybe this is not the best forum or subforum for the questions, anyway, here goes:

1) What books would you advise me learn some basics on Qigong?

2) How does Qigong relate to Buddhism?

Thanks

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Johnny Dangerous
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Re: Qigong and Buddhism

Post by Johnny Dangerous » Mon Mar 06, 2017 10:31 pm

Nosta wrote:I am curious about Qigong. So, maybe this is not the best forum or subforum for the questions, anyway, here goes:

1) What books would you advise me learn some basics on Qigong?

2) How does Qigong relate to Buddhism?

Thanks

Roughly speaking there are Daoist and Buddhist strains of Qigong. The Yi Jin Jing classic is credited to Bodhidharma, but AFAIK this is somewhat disputed these days. Generally the "internal" forms of Qigong seem to be more associated with Daoism. I have not heard of any well-known Buddhist Qigong teachers, but I know it is "out there" to some degree.

I learned Qigong originally as a martial arts supplement from my father and a couple other people, so I don't know that much about the religious dimension beyond what i've read. My favorite general read on the Subject: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/210 ... g_Chi_Kung

It's of course best to get instruction, but there is stuff like Zhan Zhaung which some teachers say one can learn "the basics" of from books. You can learn the simple postures and get some very tangible health benefits from this kind of practice for sure, but personally I would not go outside the simple scope of health/longevity that such instruction is typically offered in without a teacher. Meaning, I would not touch the "spiritual" end of Qigong without a teacher, personally. Typically you can break it into three categories, martial, medical, and spiritual.
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Russell
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Re: Qigong and Buddhism

Post by Russell » Mon Mar 06, 2017 10:46 pm

Lots of free info here, and if you leave your email you get the first chapters of a book on qigong: http://www.energyarts.com/qigong

Also: http://www.taichimaster.com/category/buddhism/

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Nosta
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Re: Qigong and Buddhism

Post by Nosta » Tue Mar 07, 2017 9:30 am

Thanks for the information, of both you :)

And by the way, my objective is not spiritual, like buddhism, I just want to to free some energy, to let it flow a little better and improve some health.

thecowisflying
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Re: Qigong and Buddhism

Post by thecowisflying » Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:58 am

QiGong is a 20th century term that developed from various teachers who developed their own systems and ranged from frauds to meditation experts. Which is why I don't really like a lot of recent/modern teachers since it is hard to tell if they actually had a transmission from a teacher or is just trying to scam you.

QiGong developed from earlier Daoist exercises that developed possibly from the warring states period and reached its zenith of development in the Jin and Song Dynasties around 12th century AD in the NeiDan Inner Alchemy Movements. This movement generally started in the Tang Dynasty moving away from external alchemy, magic, physical exercises and various other less efficient methods to a combination of traditional Daoist esoteric energy exercises, influence from Chan in the form of sudden enlightenment and Buddhism for meditation.

One drawback of NeiDan is the complex symbolic language they used for example Ming or Life representing what is cultivated in tantric/esoteric practices can called anything from Cinnabar, Southern Fire to Tiger and Mind can be known as Mercury, Northern water or Dragon. So really confusing, I might have gotten those terms mixed up.

If you are interested I heavily recommend reading teachings from the Quan Zhen (Complete Reality School) whose founders sought to combine Buddhsim, Daoism and Confucianism.

One of the founding texts of Inner Alchemy is Wu Zhen Pian, Awakening to Reality written by Zhang Bo Duan who was well versed in both Buddhism and Daoism and included a large excerpt at the end of his work using Buddhist rather than Daoist terms.


Here's Thomas Cleary's translation including a commentary from Liu YI Ming a Daoist adept who like many of his Quan Zhen predeccessors had a strong understanding of Buddhism
http://terebess.hu/english/Cleary-Thoma ... o-tuan.pdf


Here's a collection work by Liu Yi Ming, Liu Yi Ming's great IMO :twothumbsup:
https://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/04/17/ ... o-tuan.pdf

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