Dharma Wheel Heavy Weights

Casual conversation between friends. Anything goes (almost).
Motova
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Re: Dharma Wheel Heavy Weights

Post by Motova » Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:53 pm

Just because Malcolm is cool and accessible doesn't mean one should be a gomer.

Personally, I'm interested in what languages Loppon knows, what his favourite non-Buddhist books are, and what he has memorized.

I bet he has read 1000+ books.

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Malcolm
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Re: Dharma Wheel Heavy Weights

Post by Malcolm » Thu Nov 23, 2017 9:14 pm

Motova wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:53 pm
Just because Malcolm is cool and accessible doesn't mean one should be a gomer.

Personally, I'm interested in what languages Loppon knows, what his favourite non-Buddhist books are, and what he has memorized.

I bet he has read 1000+ books.
Just Tibetan and English, smattering of Sanskrit.

I used to read alot of Scifi, but these days I find that boring. I don't read much since I am busy working all day.
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The knowledge imparted through the guru’s instructions that formerly was unknown (avidyā) is vidyā.


—Treasury of the Supreme Vehicle, Longchenpa.

Motova
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Re: Dharma Wheel Heavy Weights

Post by Motova » Fri Nov 24, 2017 12:34 am

Malcolm wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 9:14 pm
Motova wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:53 pm
Just because Malcolm is cool and accessible doesn't mean one should be a gomer.

Personally, I'm interested in what languages Loppon knows, what his favourite non-Buddhist books are, and what he has memorized.

I bet he has read 1000+ books.
Just Tibetan and English, smattering of Sanskrit.

I used to read alot of Scifi, but these days I find that boring. I don't read much since I am busy working all day.
Did Star Wars play any role in your interest in the Dharma?

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Coëmgenu
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Location: Whitby, Ontario

Re: Dharma Wheel Heavy Weights

Post by Coëmgenu » Fri Nov 24, 2017 2:12 pm

CedarTree wrote:
Sun Nov 19, 2017 9:37 pm
*Meaning what are you doing, studying, practicing, and how do you see your life and practice as well as others and others practices*
I've already outed myself as someone not qualified to be giving advice as a "heavyweight" or authority of any sort here.

That being said, if I could return back to your OP, CedarTree, what I would say is this:

I came into Buddhism through atheism, of a particularly Dawkinsian "New" variety, but before that, I was raised in a Methodist household. Christians don't have moments where they start going into a Christian "practice" and ending a Christian "practice". Christianity is holistic and effects every waking moment of a Christian's life. I don't see Buddhism as any different, and I'm sure that no one here treats "practice" like an on/off switch of something you "do" and then "don't do". That being said, its interesting that Buddhists generally, on these forums at least, speak of practice in such a way. The highest dimension to Buddhism, in my unqualified opinion, is the realization and fruition of profound practice in the constant waking daily life of the practitioner. I am unlikely to be alone in this. I see "practice" as every thought, every word, every interaction, and every contemplation. Every mindset and every mind-moment.

That being said, it is also something of a brutal criterion under which to judge one's self, but I think it is also a realistic criterion. What did I do after doing "Buddhist stuff"? That is what I look for when reviewing myself. As such, how good I am as a practitioner is very much how good I am as a human being. Sometimes quite good, IMO, sometimes quite bad and not proud of myself at all.

On terms of things I try to do "daily" to stay engaged, I observe a practice that is actually modelled after my Anglican boyfriend's practice, who is much more pious and generally a better human being than me, though that is not related to his piousness directly necessarily. Anglican's pray a set of rotating prayers called the Daily Office. Inspired by my boyfriend's observation of this office (also called the 'Liturgy of the Hours'), I took to incorporating some of the morning service into a parallel morning activity for myself to supplement my visitation to the nearby Dharma Centre I attend a few towns over. "Proper" or "advanced" meditation (i.e. "Buddhist" meditation that goes beyond basic smṛtyupasthāna/establishment of mindfulness via breath, basic stuff, etc.) is not something that I have actually incorporated into my practice at all as of yet. I have significant personal reservations about engaging in what I perceive to be advanced Buddhist meditation.

Meditation aside, I do not consider this morning activity of mine "Buddhist practice", as no Buddhist teacher has ever suggested to me that I start doing this, it's simply "what I do", based on what some other people "do". I suppose that is what practice is, though, what one "does".

I adapted the sequence from the morning service, like I mentioned earlier.

Currently I do:

1) Incense gāthā
2) Śūraṅgama dhāraṇī (this one is more of a challenge to myself than something I actually chant in it's fulness every day. I would like to have it eventually memorized. As such, I only use what I have memorized currently, which is the firstmost section, which then leads directly into 3) instead of the other dhāraṇī.)
3) Heart Sūtra

That is clipping off the middle and end of the proper monastic observance of the morning service, which includes numerous other sections. Maybe if some day I find myself having fully memorized and more-or-less "used to" the above, I may add more or change it up, but if I can at least do the 3 up there, then at the very least, I did "something". That being said, the Śūraṅgama dhāraṇī is rather massive, and I have set myself quite the task to memorize it, given that short-term memory and long-term memorization have always been my most horrible skills.
並畢竟空。並如來藏。並實相。非三 而三三而不三。非合非散而合而散。非非合非非散。不可一異而一異。
All three truths are ultimately empty, all are tathāgatagarbha, all are true aspect. Not three, they are three; three, they are not three. Neither combined nor separated, neither uncombined nor unseparated. Neither same nor different, yet in a sense same, and in a sense different.

夫三諦者。 天然之性徳也。 中諦者。 統一切法。 眞諦者。 泯一切法。 俗諦者。 立一切法。
The three truths. Heaven-sent natural characteristics. The middle truth unifies all dharmas. The ultimate truth demolishes all dharmas. The conventional truth establishes all dharmas.

摩訶止観始終心要Móhēzhǐguān, Shǐzhōngxīnyào.

Motova
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Re: Dharma Wheel Heavy Weights

Post by Motova » Fri Nov 24, 2017 3:44 pm

Coëmgenu wrote:
Fri Nov 24, 2017 2:12 pm
That being said, the Śūraṅgama dhāraṇī is rather massive, and I have set myself quite the task to memorize it, given that short-term memory and long-term memorization have always been my most horrible skills.
You should research mnemonics.

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CedarTree
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Re: Dharma Wheel Heavy Weights

Post by CedarTree » Fri Nov 24, 2017 5:54 pm

Astus wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:07 pm
CedarTree wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 5:24 pm
Only one thing you mentioned was unclear to me and I would like you to explore it a bit. "This bamboo is long, that one is short". I have an idea but I rather you show me your understanding and the origin of this teaching.
Master Yunmen quoted Dharma teacher [Seng] Zhao’s words:
"All individual entities (dharmas) are without difference — [yet] one must not stretch the duck’s [legs] and shorten the crane’s, level the peaks and fill up the valleys, and then think that they are not different!"

(Record of Yunmen, p 193, tr App)

"Within and without (the cosmos) is calm. Co-operation has ceased.
Thus, restoring the union, the Sage withdraws into silence.
Therefore a sutra says: 'Dharma do not differ (from each other)'. Does it tell us 'to stretch the legs of the duck and cut short those of the crane', to pull down the mountains and fill up the valleys in order to smooth out life? If only you can understand that the diverse is of the relative order then it loses its diversity. Therefore a Sutra says: 'Marvellous, World-honoured One, taking your stand in oneness you say that the dharma vary'. It also says: 'Prajna and the dharma are neither one nor two'. This we may believe."

(Chao Lun, ch 3, p 79, tr Liebenthal)

"He who holds to True Rightness does not lose the original form of his inborn nature. So for him, joined things are not webbed toes; things forking off are not superfluous fingers; the long is never too much; the short is never too little. 9 The duck’s legs are short, but to stretch them out would worry him; the crane’s legs are long, but to cut them down would make him sad. What is long by nature needs no cutting off; what is short by nature needs no stretching. That would be no way to get rid of worry."
(Zhuangzi, ch 8, p 61, tr Watson)
Thanks for sharing, been reading the old Chan cases and strangely enough this one hasn't been present and all types of obscure ones have been listed. :)

Practice, Practice, Practice

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