What we're reading - Split from "America is hooked on violence"

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joy&peace
Posts: 1115
Joined: Mon May 11, 2015 4:53 pm

What we're reading - Split from "America is hooked on violence"

Post by joy&peace »

Split from America is hooked on violence.
Ayu wrote: Tue Sep 03, 2019 8:44 pm Just take a look at hollywood films. They only know violent problem-solving. Somebody shouts at or kills the bad guy.

(I mean, compare Hollywood to Bollywood, or to Chinese movies, Italian or French films... Even German movies are not all about war. ;) )

But american literature is more intelligent, IMHO.
Thanks. I actually enjoy German a lot. Johann Fichte was nice. I read Siddhartha and Goethe at 15, and later enjoyed Blonde Eckbert, which we talked about before. Classic German story-telling has a lot of faerie and mystical about it. This particular story had some mystery, with out any scariness involved. Those things reached a height with The Erlking, by Goethe.

But actually, Wilhelm Meister was a favorite for a while. Long and involved, beautiful and mellow. The most violent thing that happens in the entire 7, or 800 page novel is that W. gets a hit on the head ..

Goethe had understood in the intervening 30 years after Werther, that what he wrote matters. After Werther, whose protagonist eventually ends his life over love of Lotte, there was a spate of suicides from lovers of the book. As well as, a surge in the style of fashion described.

The same beauty and mystique can be found in Moondog, the composer of Elfdance, Bird's Lament I, and hundreds of other songs. This American of German ancestry was born gifted in music, but became more devoted to it after becoming blind at 16. Later he lived in New York, and eventually also spent time in Germany, exploring his ancestral roots.

In New York, he would do a very Zen-like thing. He would stand completely motionless sometimes, holding a staff.... And of course, garbed all in a Viking outfit.

However there was a simple reason for the horns and helmet; he eschewed any reference to Jesus about him, (I'd say mostly because of his looks.)

Back to Dharma;

1 and 3 of the 37 Practices are nice

1
Right now, you have a good boat, fully equipped and available — hard to find.
To free others and you from the sea of samsara,
Day and night, fully alert and present,
Study, reflect, and meditate — this is the practice of a bodhisattva.

3
Don’t engage disturbances and reactive emotions gradually fade away;
Don’t engage distractions and spiritual practice naturally grows;
Keep awareness clear and vivid and confidence in the way arises.
Rely on silence — this is the practice of a bodhisattva.

One of the classic points is that we must have peace in ourselves to gain peace elsewhere. The best results happen from total dedication to the well-being of all. And to the cultivation of happiness and enlightenment in ourselves and others.

On a more mundane level, news does not give us an accurate picture of the world. The reason is referred to as the frequency.

For instance let's say we live in a town of 5000. No one has much crime or certainly not killing.

A very sleepy little town. Now in our town, if we are not afraid of some Invaders, then all we have to contend with is the life and our neighbors.

Naturally such places are quiet, and peaceful, with not a lot of car traffic.

Deer are mostly surviving their trips across the road, because no one is driving 45 miles an hour.

Anyway, we have no source for fear there. If we exert our full strength in the Dharma, we will make a lot of progress.

As Dogen said, the guardians of Earth assure fulfillment.

Frequency thing is that what is close to us is 0 killing.

But let's focus on scripture a bit.

Fearlessness is mentioned throughout the scriptures. The Ahi Sutta (please look it up,) discusses this. In the Prajna Paramitam the similar topic is vastly elaborated.

Other scriptures give wonderful enlightenment about formlessness, and similar topics.

If we meditate in nature for one month, we learn so much...

Very happy and wishing much peace.
Om Gate Gate Paragate Parasamgate bodhi svaha
Tenma
Posts: 1076
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 4:25 am

Re: America is hooked on violence

Post by Tenma »

joy&peace wrote: Wed Sep 04, 2019 2:30 am
Ayu wrote: Tue Sep 03, 2019 8:44 pm Just take a look at hollywood films. They only know violent problem-solving. Somebody shouts at or kills the bad guy.

(I mean, compare Hollywood to Bollywood, or to Chinese movies, Italian or French films... Even German movies are not all about war. ;) )

But american literature is more intelligent, IMHO.
Thanks. I actually enjoy German a lot. Johann Fichte was nice. I read Siddhartha and Goethe at 15, and later enjoyed Blonde Eckbert, which we talked about before. Classic German story-telling has a lot of faerie and mystical about it. This particular story had some mystery, with out any scariness involved. Those things reached a height with The Erlking, by Goethe.

But actually, Wilhelm Meister was a favorite for a while. Long and involved, beautiful and mellow. The most violent thing that happens in the entire 7, or 800 page novel is that W. gets a hit on the head ..

Goethe had understood in the intervening 30 years after Werther, that what he wrote matters. After Werther, whose protagonist eventually ends his life over love of Lotte, there was a spate of suicides from lovers of the book. As well as, a surge in the style of fashion described.

The same beauty and mystique can be found in Moondog, the composer of Elfdance, Bird's Lament I, and hundreds of other songs. This American of German ancestry was born gifted in music, but became more devoted to it after becoming blind at 16. Later he lived in New York, and eventually also spent time in Germany, exploring his ancestral roots.

In New York, he would do a very Zen-like thing. He would stand completely motionless sometimes, holding a staff.... And of course, garbed all in a Viking outfit.

However there was a simple reason for the horns and helmet; he eschewed any reference to Jesus about him, (I'd say mostly because of his looks.)

Back to Dharma;

1 and 3 of the 37 Practices are nice

1
Right now, you have a good boat, fully equipped and available — hard to find.
To free others and you from the sea of samsara,
Day and night, fully alert and present,
Study, reflect, and meditate — this is the practice of a bodhisattva.

3
Don’t engage disturbances and reactive emotions gradually fade away;
Don’t engage distractions and spiritual practice naturally grows;
Keep awareness clear and vivid and confidence in the way arises.
Rely on silence — this is the practice of a bodhisattva.

One of the classic points is that we must have peace in ourselves to gain peace elsewhere. The best results happen from total dedication to the well-being of all. And to the cultivation of happiness and enlightenment in ourselves and others.

On a more mundane level, news does not give us an accurate picture of the world. The reason is referred to as the frequency.

For instance let's say we live in a town of 5000. No one has much crime or certainly not killing.

A very sleepy little town. Now in our town, if we are not afraid of some Invaders, then all we have to contend with is the life and our neighbors.

Naturally such places are quiet, and peaceful, with not a lot of car traffic.

Deer are mostly surviving their trips across the road, because no one is driving 45 miles an hour.

Anyway, we have no source for fear there. If we exert our full strength in the Dharma, we will make a lot of progress.

As Dogen said, the guardians of Earth assure fulfillment.

Frequency thing is that what is close to us is 0 killing.

But let's focus on scripture a bit.

Fearlessness is mentioned throughout the scriptures. The Ahi Sutta (please look it up,) discusses this. In the Prajna Paramitam the similar topic is vastly elaborated.

Other scriptures give wonderful enlightenment about formlessness, and similar topics.

If we meditate in nature for one month, we learn so much...

Very happy and wishing much peace.
With American literature, I'm more to Edgar Allan Poe and H.P. Lovecraft, particularly the existentialism that thrives as a teen myself.
"Uncle Tom's Cabin," "To Kill a Mockingbird," "The Crucible," "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," "The Bell Jar," and "The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave" were pretty good as well when not being existential or terrifying.

However, I detested "The Great Gatsby" (too mundane in my opinion alongside bourgeois with pathetic/disgraceful/arrogant/selfish characters) and lots of works by Ayn Rand (I just wasn't able to submit myself to even "Anthem," which wasn't a bad book, but I didn't agree with the message).
joy&peace
Posts: 1115
Joined: Mon May 11, 2015 4:53 pm

Re: America is hooked on violence

Post by joy&peace »

The two I am reading now are 'The Brothers Karamazov' by Dostoevsky and 'A Children's Book of Garden Verses' by Stevenson. When I was 17, Dostoevsky's book really transported me, almost mystically. Now it's a standing work that still is worth reading.

I can't even mention anything in relation to Stevenson's work. I honestly cannot express his level of perfection of his craft. . . It has innocence, beauty, rhythm and how they are written, it's beyond how I can express. Music and light.

I enjoyed those you mention. I think of American literature, two places of interest are Isaac Asimov and Philip K. Dick. Asimov was very prolific and wrote hundreds and hundreds of books, both scientific and fiction. His science books are dated and have some many mistakes, but also have some tremendously, tremendously prescient predictions.

Asimov was a long-term thinker, so to speak, and he understood social groups in a good way.

I couldn't read him today though 😊 actually for a few years. But I had enjoyed them, before.

Nice talking with you Tenma.
Om Gate Gate Paragate Parasamgate bodhi svaha
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Ayu
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Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2012 8:25 am
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Re: What we're reading - Split from "America is hooked on violence"

Post by Ayu »

joy&peace wrote: Wed Sep 04, 2019 2:30 am ...
Back to Dharma;

1 and 3 of the 37 Practices are nice

1
Right now, you have a good boat, fully equipped and available — hard to find.
To free others and you from the sea of samsara,
Day and night, fully alert and present,
Study, reflect, and meditate — this is the practice of a bodhisattva.

3
Don’t engage disturbances and reactive emotions gradually fade away;
Don’t engage distractions and spiritual practice naturally grows;
Keep awareness clear and vivid and confidence in the way arises.
Rely on silence — this is the practice of a bodhisattva.

One of the classic points is that we must have peace in ourselves to gain peace elsewhere. The best results happen from total dedication to the well-being of all. And to the cultivation of happiness and enlightenment in ourselves and others.
....

Very happy and wishing much peace.
:smile: Thanks a lot for this reminder. Very important for me right now. :namaste:
Lots of happiness, peace of mind, being satisfied with how the things are. For you & everybody.
For the benefit and ease of all sentient beings. :heart:
DharmaN00b
Posts: 397
Joined: Sat Jul 15, 2017 4:12 pm

Re: What we're reading - Split from "America is hooked on violence"

Post by DharmaN00b »

Agreed thanks joy and peace! :good: :thanks:
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Ayu
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Re: What we're reading - Split from "America is hooked on violence"

Post by Ayu »

BTW, my favorite author is Amy Tan. She's American but her parents are Chinese. Every book tells about young American-Chinese women and their conflicts with their Chinese mothers who do not adjust to American way of life and thinking.
Tan provides a loving insight into Chinese culture, generation conflicts and cultural gap.
For the benefit and ease of all sentient beings. :heart:
Fortyeightvows
Posts: 2948
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2014 2:37 am

Re: America is hooked on violence

Post by Fortyeightvows »

Tenma wrote: Wed Sep 04, 2019 3:58 am "The Crucible,"
"Theology is a fortress and no crack in a fortress is considered small"
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