If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Queequeg » Thu Apr 20, 2017 10:22 pm

Astus wrote:
Queequeg wrote:We're talking about Lotus Buddhism, and so you need to rely on Lotus Buddhism sources for definitions.


Isn't there something from Nichiren on the matter that explains these issues?



What issues? Whether Zhiyi is authority on how terms should be understood? I'm sensing you're asking questions without any real idea about what you are asking.

Zhiyi defines the Sudden and Perfect Path as the path based on Buddhanature. The Perfect teaching can appear as a gradual path, but that doesn't mean it is really is gradual path.


Zhiyi taught an extensive system of various practices where the progress from ordinary being to enlightenment is logically explained. How can that be replaced by simple recitation?


Much of what he taught was Gradual and Distinct. He Taught Sudden and Perfect meditation only in the 7th section of Mohezhikuan. That's the Ichinen Sanzen meditation.
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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby rory » Thu Apr 20, 2017 10:43 pm

Astus wrote:Isn't there something from Nichiren on the matter that explains these issues?

Zhiyi taught an extensive system of various practices where the progress from ordinary being to enlightenment is logically explained. How can that be replaced by simple recitation?


Stone discusses this, Nichiren had the idea from Zhiyi of the seed of Buddhanture
Stone, Original Enlightenment:

Although the very notion of a 'seed' tends to suggest a gradual process of growth and maturation, In Nichiren's thought, because "original cause: and "original effect" are simultaneious, the "process" of sowing, maturing and harvesting also occurs simultaneously. This is called, in the terminology of Nichirenshu doctrine, "the seed being simultaneiously [the harvest of] liberation" (shu soku datsu). Nichiren explains this idea...to a lay follower:



p.271 and there is a quote from Ueno-ama gozen gohenji....which I dont have but someone could post it's the part about the lotus simultaneously flowering and producing fruit.

Tendai Shu of course has the concept endon sho :
Perfect and Sudden Calming-and-Contemplation
The perfect and sudden calming and contemplation from the very beginning takes ultimate reality as its object. No matter what the object of contemplation might be, it is seen to be identical to the middle. There is nothing that is not true reality. When one fixes the mind on the dharmadhatu as object and unifies one’s mindfulness with the dharmadhatu as it is, then there is not a single sight nor smell that is not the middle way. The same goes for the realm of self, the realm of Buddha, and the realm of living beings. Since all aggregates and sense-accesses of body and mind are thusness, there is no suffering to be cast away. Since nescience and the afflictions are themselves identical with enlightenment, there is no origiina of suffering to be eradicated. Since the two extreme views are the middle way and false views are the right way, there is no path to be cultivated. Since samsara is identical with nirvana, there is no cessation to be achieved. Because of the intrinsic inextistence of suffering and its origin, the mundane does not exist; because of the inexistence of of the path and its cessation, the supramundane does not exist. A single, unalloyed reality is all there is – no entities whatever exists outside of it. That all entities are by nature quiescent is called “calming”; that, though quiescent, this nature is ever luminous, is called “contemplation”. Though a verbal distinction is made between earlier and later stages of practice, there is no ultimate duality, no distinction between them. This is what is called “the perfect and sudden calming and contemplation.” (pp. 112-114)
Hawaii Press "Great Calming and Contemplation"
gassho
Rory
Namu Kanzeon Bosatsu
Chih-I:
The Tai-ching states "the women in the realms of Mara, Sakra and Brahma all neither abandoned ( their old) bodies nor received (new) bodies. They all received buddhahood with their current bodies (genshin)" Thus these verses state that the dharma nature is like a great ocean. No right or wrong is preached (within it) Ordinary people and sages are equal, without superiority or inferiority
Paul, Groner "The Lotus Sutra in Japanese Culture"eds. Tanabe p. 58

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby rory » Thu Apr 20, 2017 10:57 pm

To clarify:

Medieval and modern Tendai Shu maintain original enlightenment.

Nichiren started out maintaining original enlightenment but later abandoned it. Mainstream Nichiren sects like Nichiren Shu and Kempon Hokke Shu (they were one sect during the war years) maintain the buddha seed theory, so whilst you have moments while chanting in front of your Gohonzon, you go for rebirth or go to the Pure Land of Tranquil Light and practice there to develop and reach Enlightenment.

SGI, Nichiren Shoshu and other sects hold original enlightenment theory.

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Namu Kanzeon Bosatsu
Chih-I:
The Tai-ching states "the women in the realms of Mara, Sakra and Brahma all neither abandoned ( their old) bodies nor received (new) bodies. They all received buddhahood with their current bodies (genshin)" Thus these verses state that the dharma nature is like a great ocean. No right or wrong is preached (within it) Ordinary people and sages are equal, without superiority or inferiority
Paul, Groner "The Lotus Sutra in Japanese Culture"eds. Tanabe p. 58

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Queequeg » Thu Apr 20, 2017 11:01 pm

You know, it occurs to me, there is a big chunk of this discussion that is being left out - ichinensanzen, or "Three Thousand Realms in a Single Thought-Moment". Without that, this discussion is pretty much knee capped. You can't understand Daimoku without it. I don't think you can understand Tiantai without it.
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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Queequeg » Thu Apr 20, 2017 11:14 pm

rory wrote:To clarify:

Medieval and modern Tendai Shu maintain original enlightenment.

Nichiren started out maintaining original enlightenment but later abandoned it. Mainstream Nichiren sects like Nichiren Shu and Kempon Hokke Shu (they were one sect during the war years) maintain the buddha seed theory, so whilst you have moments while chanting in front of your Gohonzon, you go for rebirth or go to the Pure Land of Tranquil Light and practice there to develop and reach Enlightenment.

SGI, Nichiren Shoshu and other sects hold original enlightenment theory.

gassho
Rory


I never thought about that... but that makes sense. The emphasis on Shakyamuni in Shu and Kempon, as opposed to emphasis on what amounts to a cosmic Buddha in the Fuji schools - maybe others? I don't know.
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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby narhwal90 » Fri Apr 21, 2017 12:15 am

@rory- Nichiren abandoning the original enlightenment is an interesting proposition- could you suggest some hints as to where I might pursue that line of inquiry? SGI being in the camp of original enlightenment as a consequence of ichinen sanzen that sort of idea doesn't come up. Thx.

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Anonymous X » Fri Apr 21, 2017 6:51 am

Astus wrote:A sudden path means buddhahood right now, no development, no practice, just perfect enlightenment. Would you say that the moment one utters NMRK one has unbounded wisdom and compassion?


Astus, I could use the example of Dogen's premise that just sitting is a natural expression of Buddhahood. Does this mean that anyone who sits zazen is a Buddha and is replete with Omniscience?

I don't think your definition of a sudden path is necessarily accurate. A path is an avenue to something, an attainment. Spontaneous awakening is something different. Even with a spontaneous awakening, there will be an acclimation to it that could be seen as taking time, ala step by step, but even this is misleading. Once the recognition of Buddhanature takes hold, time is not of any importance. Integration is not seen as a time-space activity. It all becomes spontaneous. All dharmas are apprehended in their original nature. Nothing to do, nothing to be understood, nothing to acheive. Have I missed the point?

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Anonymous X » Fri Apr 21, 2017 6:58 am

rory wrote:
Perfect and Sudden Calming-and-Contemplation
The perfect and sudden calming and contemplation from the very beginning takes ultimate reality as its object. No matter what the object of contemplation might be, it is seen to be identical to the middle. There is nothing that is not true reality. When one fixes the mind on the dharmadhatu as object and unifies one’s mindfulness with the dharmadhatu as it is, then there is not a single sight nor smell that is not the middle way. The same goes for the realm of self, the realm of Buddha, and the realm of living beings. Since all aggregates and sense-accesses of body and mind are thusness, there is no suffering to be cast away. Since nescience and the afflictions are themselves identical with enlightenment, there is no origiina of suffering to be eradicated. Since the two extreme views are the middle way and false views are the right way, there is no path to be cultivated. Since samsara is identical with nirvana, there is no cessation to be achieved. Because of the intrinsic inextistence of suffering and its origin, the mundane does not exist; because of the inexistence of of the path and its cessation, the supramundane does not exist. A single, unalloyed reality is all there is – no entities whatever exists outside of it. That all entities are by nature quiescent is called “calming”; that, though quiescent, this nature is ever luminous, is called “contemplation”. Though a verbal distinction is made between earlier and later stages of practice, there is no ultimate duality, no distinction between them. This is what is called “the perfect and sudden calming and contemplation.” (pp. 112-114)
Hawaii Press "Great Calming and Contemplation"
gassho
Rory

It's hard to argue with this! The impact is immediate. :bow:

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Anonymous X » Fri Apr 21, 2017 8:52 am

Listening to Queenqueg's enchanting description of his experience of Nichiren's teachings, it reminds me of an incident that happened to me. About 6 years ago, I was in Puri, India, where the big temple of Jagannath is. Having breakfast with my wife in the backpacker enclave, we met a German Krishna devotee who was living in Puri. During the course of our conversation, he began to tell us what his experience of being a devotee of Krishna was all about. I listened with a kind of fascination to his words as well as to his 'feeling'. I couldn't reconcile myself to anything he said, yet I was aware that devotion and practice had yielded something real for him that I could not or would not dispute. There was a special moment shared at that table which I immediately felt as I read Queenqueg's eloquent description of his experience. Thank you, Queenqueg. :applause:

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Astus » Fri Apr 21, 2017 11:57 am

Queequeg wrote:What issues?


E.g.:

How the recitation of the title is enlightenment?
If so, what does enlightenment mean?
Or is the recitation an initial step towards further practice?
If so, what are those later practices?

Much of what he taught was Gradual and Distinct. He Taught Sudden and Perfect meditation only in the 7th section of Mohezhikuan. That's the Ichinen Sanzen meditation.


Here is something relevant by Rev. Kanji Tamura:

"Meanwhile, the existence of the Buddha as the concrete goal for all sentient beings is revealed in the essential section. According to Nichiren Shonin, the ichinen sanzen doctrine of the theoretical section is just a step to the ichinen sanzen of the essential section. When the land of the Eternal Sakyamuni Buddha, the true realm of Buddhas, was revealed for the first time in the essential section, the theory of mutual possession of ten realms integrated by the realm of Buddhas as well as the ichinen sanzen doctrine is truly realized in this world. (referring to “Open Your Eyes to the Lotus Teaching”)
Comparing both sections, the theoretical section is focused on taking steps upward to the realm of Buddhas while the essential section shows the salvation bestowed downward by Sakyamuni Buddha. Both sections the both upward and downward. However, the theoretical section emphasizes the self-improvement factors of the Lotus Sutra. It plainly says, “May the merits we have accumulated by this offering be distributed among all living beings, and may we and all other living beings attain the enlightenment of the Buddha!” (Chapter 7) On the other hand, the essential section describes Sakyamuni Buddha's vow to save all sentient beings based on His great compassion, saying, “I am always thinking: How shall I cause all living beings to enter into the unsurpassed Way and quickly become Buddha?” (Chapter 16) There, Sakyamuni Buddha’s compassion comes down to sentient beings while sentient beings are to go up to the land of Sakyamuni Buddha by their faith. This two-way connection is the basic form of the essential section.
The ichinen sanzen doctrine of the theoretical section begins with observing the transient mind that changes moment by moment. On the other hand, the ichinen sanzen of the essential section begins with unification between the great compassion of Eternal Sakyamuni Buddha and our mind of faith. In other words, to feel Eternal Sakyamuni Buddha through our existences and our faith is the ‘actuality’ (or realization) of the ichinen sanzen doctrine."

(Nichiren Shu News, no 148)

From this it seems to me that the practice of calming and contemplation is replaced by the faith that somehow Shakyamuni will transfer his buddhahood to the believers. This "somehow" is explained with the theory of interpenetration and universal buddha-nature. However, I guess because this system is based purely on faith, there is no logical connection provided for the transfer of buddhahood, nor for how realisation could happen by recitation.

there is a big chunk of this discussion that is being left out - ichinensanzen, or "Three Thousand Realms in a Single Thought-Moment". Without that, this discussion is pretty much knee capped. You can't understand Daimoku without it. I don't think you can understand Tiantai without it.


Ichinen sanzen does not explain how recitation of the title can be equal to enlightenment. Furthermore, there is no connection established between recitation and realising ichinen sanzen. This is what I really feel left out.
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Astus » Fri Apr 21, 2017 12:08 pm

rory wrote:Tendai Shu of course has the concept endon sho


And that description does fit into what a sudden path is, what enlightenment at this very moment stands for.

As Seishin quotes Ven Shoshin Ichishima on the issue of ichinen sanzen and its relation to perfect and sudden enlightenment:

"Our World, the Buddha World, the world of sentient beings, or the five aggregates are all in fact the expressions of Middle Way. You can not avoid sufferings. Ignorance and delusions themselves are the object of Enlightenment. There is not any cause of suffering to be cut off. All of Fundamental Ignorance and distorted mind are involved in the Middle Way. There isn’t any special path to be practiced. Our Life and Death are the manifestation of Nirvana."
(Ichinen Sanzen)
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Astus » Fri Apr 21, 2017 12:15 pm

Anonymous X wrote:I could use the example of Dogen's premise that just sitting is a natural expression of Buddhahood. Does this mean that anyone who sits zazen is a Buddha and is replete with Omniscience?


Of course it does.

I don't think your definition of a sudden path is necessarily accurate. A path is an avenue to something, an attainment.


If a path meant something necessarily gradual, it cannot be sudden, so that means there is no sudden path.

Spontaneous awakening is something different. Even with a spontaneous awakening, there will be an acclimation to it that could be seen as taking time, ala step by step, but even this is misleading.


Sudden enlightenment does not and can not mean some event without cause, or a chance realisation. As for the teaching of "sudden enlightenment, gradual practice", there enlightenment does not mean the attainment of buddhahood, but mostly an initial understanding.

Once the recognition of Buddhanature takes hold, time is not of any importance. Integration is not seen as a time-space activity. It all becomes spontaneous. All dharmas are apprehended in their original nature. Nothing to do, nothing to be understood, nothing to acheive. Have I missed the point?


The traditional bodhisattva path is exactly like that, first working on understanding emptiness, then realising emptiness, and then cultivating the realisation of emptiness, until full maturation as a buddha. That is what the gradual path looks like.
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Anonymous X » Fri Apr 21, 2017 1:38 pm

Astus,

I recently came across this website here in Thailand. Have you ever heard of this this monk? Luangpor Phosrisuriya Khemarato

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Anonymous X » Fri Apr 21, 2017 2:33 pm

Astus wrote:
Anonymous X wrote:I could use the example of Dogen's premise that just sitting is a natural expression of Buddhahood. Does this mean that anyone who sits zazen is a Buddha and is replete with Omniscience?


Of course it does.

I understand axiomatically, that we are all Buddhas, but functionally, in any given moment, that is usually not the case with the vast majority of people doing zazen. It is a symbolic action.

Anonymous X wrote:I don't think your definition of a sudden path is necessarily accurate. A path is an avenue to something, an attainment.


Astus wrote: a path meant something necessarily gradual, it cannot be sudden, so that means there is no sudden path.

There is and there isn't. But, for all intents and purposes, I agree.

One can practice for many years and suddenly awaken. All awakening seems to be sudden to my understanding. That would preclude any step by step. Step by step always has a division of subject/object unless there is first, an awakening to the Buddhanature.

[quote="Astus"] enlightenment does not and can not mean some event without cause, or a chance realisation. As for the teaching of "sudden enlightenment, gradual practice", there enlightenment does not mean the attainment of buddhahood, but mostly an initial understanding.[quote]

I never mentioned enlightenment and rarely use the word. If you mean awakening to Buddhanature, why would you need a cause if it is our intrinsic natural state? It only seems like something causes it. If it is a meditatvie state of mind, I would agree with you. In Dzogchen, they call rigpa, self-sprung.

[quote="Astus"]The traditional bodhisattva path is exactly like that, first working on understanding emptiness, then realising emptiness, and then cultivating the realisation of emptiness, until full maturation as a buddha. That is what the gradual path looks like.
/quote]

Who is working on understanding emptiness? Who is realising it? Who is cultivating it? This is all symbolic, not literal. This doesn't mean that nothing happens after recognition of our nature. There is a momentum, but it is non dual and you are not in charge.

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Astus » Fri Apr 21, 2017 2:54 pm

Anonymous X wrote:I recently came across this website here in Thailand. Have you ever heard of this this monk? Luangpor Phosrisuriya Khemarato


I did not. However, in the talk you linked the context is different, but it's always good to remind oneself that all views are false.

"Through the idea that (something is) agreeable, (the ignorant) become attached (to it); separating themselves from that (idea), (the mediocre) are free from attachment; when (the lofty- minded) see (that everything), as the man created by magic, lacks an own being, they attain nirvana."
(Nagarjuna: Yuktisastika 56)
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Astus » Fri Apr 21, 2017 3:11 pm

Anonymous X wrote:It is a symbolic action.


If that were not the case, then it would be just rhetoric to trick people.

One can practice for many years and suddenly awaken. All awakening seems to be sudden to my understanding. That would preclude any step by step.


Gradual practice followed by a "sudden" awakening is a different issue.

Step by step always has a division of subject/object unless there is first, an awakening to the Buddhanature.


Only buddhas are awakened to the buddha-nature.

I never mentioned enlightenment and rarely use the word. If you mean awakening to Buddhanature, why would you need a cause if it is our intrinsic natural state? It only seems like something causes it. If it is a meditatvie state of mind, I would agree with you.


There is necessarily a path to liberation, otherwise there is no chance of anyone becoming free from samsara. Assuming there is no cause of awakening is considered a wrong view in Buddhism.

In Dzogchen, they call rigpa, self-sprung.


I assume you mean rangjung (rang - self; byung - arise).

Who is working on understanding emptiness? Who is realising it? Who is cultivating it?


It's called a bodhisattva.

This is all symbolic, not literal.


What is the difference between symbolic and literal? Can you give examples to both?

There is a momentum, but it is non dual and you are not in charge.


What is viryaparamita for then?
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby White Lotus » Fri Apr 21, 2017 5:03 pm

Astus, its good to see the sudden path so clearly and accurately explained. Thank you! I however am on the gradual path and have no enlightenment to speak of. :)
in any matters of importance. dont rely on me. i may not know what i am talking about. take what i say as mere speculation. i am not ordained. nor do i have a formal training. i do believe though that if i am wrong on any point. there are those on this site who i hope will quickly point out my mistakes.

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Anonymous X » Fri Apr 21, 2017 6:19 pm

Astus wrote:What is the difference between symbolic and literal? Can you give examples to both?


Concept is symbolic, direct experience is literal. Can you show me advaya? No, but you 'know' when it is the case.

There is a momentum, but it is non dual and you are not in charge.


Astus wrote:what is viryaparamita for then?


This has something to do with 'hero wisdom'. What it is I can't say. I would think this is a word that would be subject to different interpretations. What is yours?

BTW, the link I attached wasn't in reference to what we were discussing. I thought it would interest you to hear this kind of dharma talk from a forest monk. On the homepage of the website, they show him meeting with Tibetan Lamas in Dharamsala.

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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby Queequeg » Fri Apr 21, 2017 7:51 pm

Anonymous X wrote:Thank you, Queenqueg. :applause:


You're... wel... come?
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Re: If according to Nichiren Buddhism, the Buddha taught people according to their level of understanding or capacity...

Postby rory » Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:00 pm

Okay, here is the passage from Original Enlightenment:

"That ordinary worldlings born in the Final Dharma age can believe in the Lotus Sutra is because the Buddha realm is inherent in the human realm." Thus the "one though-moment containing three thouseand realms" is also the "single of belief and understanding," In the moment of faith, the three thousand realms of the original Buddha and those of the ordinary worldling are one. This moment of faith corresponds to the stage of myoji-soku. Like that of many medieval Tendai texts, Nichiren's thought focuses on realizing Buddhahood at the state of verbal identity, which he understood as the stage of embracing the daimoku of the Lotus sutra and taking faith in it.
p. 270

The quote is from Nichiren's Kanjin Honzon Sho.

Medieval Tendai original enlightenment discourse "As seen in the Shinnyo kan radical claims are made for the transformative power of the single moment's faith and understanding ichinen shinge achieved at the stage of verbal identity"

[Rory: The Shinnyo kan (the contemplation of suchness) is an early text interpreting Pure Land from an original enlightenment perspective. The theme is the immediatate realization of Buddhahood by awakening to the universal reality of suchness]

....but "To say that "walking standing, sitting, and lying down are themselves the essence of calming and contemplation" is thus to express the insight of one awakened to original nonduality, not to deny the necessity of practice." p. 216. [Rory: the bold is mine]

gassho
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Namu Kanzeon Bosatsu
Chih-I:
The Tai-ching states "the women in the realms of Mara, Sakra and Brahma all neither abandoned ( their old) bodies nor received (new) bodies. They all received buddhahood with their current bodies (genshin)" Thus these verses state that the dharma nature is like a great ocean. No right or wrong is preached (within it) Ordinary people and sages are equal, without superiority or inferiority
Paul, Groner "The Lotus Sutra in Japanese Culture"eds. Tanabe p. 58


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