Mixing Buddhist and non-Buddhist Practices?

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Russell
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Re: Mixing Buddhist and non-Buddhist Practices?

Post by Russell » Mon Sep 01, 2014 10:45 am

Sherab Dorje wrote:
Malcolm wrote:First, the translation is a little off: it is not happiness and suffering, it is bde ba and mi bde ba. Here we can understand it is not sukha and dukha, but more like sparśa and asparśa, things we want to have contact with and things we want to avoid contact with.

The whole point of the Buddhist path is to attain permanent sukha, which is the absence of dukha.
Thank you!
Yes thanks, this clarification is a useful reminder.

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Vajrasvapna
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Re: Mixing Buddhist and non-Buddhist Practices?

Post by Vajrasvapna » Mon Sep 01, 2014 2:08 pm

Sherab Dorje wrote:
Vajrasvapna wrote:
Sherab Dorje wrote:Anybody know what exactly is meant by the term ordinariness?

Thanks!
"ordinariness - the quality of being ordinary"
http://www.webster-dictionary.org/defin ... dinariness

"not different or special or unexpected in any way; usual"
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/diction ... dinariness
I understand what the word itself means, I mean in the specific context what is the word trying to convey?
Commonly, Buddhist texts support the idea of ​​a spiritual aristocracy, which reminds me of the writings of the German philosopher Nietzsche. In this context, he is referring to behaviors that increase negative emotions and attachment to the eight worldly dharmas. So beings that have this behavior are ordinary beings, or samsaric beings and the goal of Buddhism is to convert them to the path of liberation or enlightenment.
"People these days use whatever little dharma they know to augment afflictive emotion, and then engender tremendous pride and conceit over it. They teach the Dharma without taming their own minds. But as with a river rock , not even a hair’s tip of benefit penetrates the other people. Even worse, incorrigible people [are attracted] to this dharma that increases conflict. When individuals who could be tamed by the Dharma encounter such incorrigible, their desire for the sacred Dharma is lost. It is not the fault of the Dharma; it is the fault of individuals." Machik Labdron prophecy.

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Grigoris
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Re: Mixing Buddhist and non-Buddhist Practices?

Post by Grigoris » Mon Sep 01, 2014 4:18 pm

Vajrasvapna wrote:Commonly, Buddhist texts support the idea of ​​a spiritual aristocracy, which reminds me of the writings of the German philosopher Nietzsche. In this context, he is referring to behaviors that increase negative emotions and attachment to the eight worldly dharmas. So beings that have this behavior are ordinary beings, or samsaric beings and the goal of Buddhism is to convert them to the path of liberation or enlightenment.
That's what I thought, thanks.

What is the source book/text for the quotation?
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde

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Vajrasvapna
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Re: Mixing Buddhist and non-Buddhist Practices?

Post by Vajrasvapna » Mon Sep 01, 2014 4:26 pm

Sherab Dorje wrote:
Vajrasvapna wrote:Commonly, Buddhist texts support the idea of ​​a spiritual aristocracy, which reminds me of the writings of the German philosopher Nietzsche. In this context, he is referring to behaviors that increase negative emotions and attachment to the eight worldly dharmas. So beings that have this behavior are ordinary beings, or samsaric beings and the goal of Buddhism is to convert them to the path of liberation or enlightenment.
That's what I thought, thanks.

What is the source book/text for the quotation?
The Bodhicitta chapter of the book "Dakini Teachings: A Collectin of Padmasambhava's Advice to the Dakini Yeshe". In this text, Guru Padmasambhava offers his definitions of the Mahayana concepts, a must read for anyone who has taken the bodhisattva vow.
"People these days use whatever little dharma they know to augment afflictive emotion, and then engender tremendous pride and conceit over it. They teach the Dharma without taming their own minds. But as with a river rock , not even a hair’s tip of benefit penetrates the other people. Even worse, incorrigible people [are attracted] to this dharma that increases conflict. When individuals who could be tamed by the Dharma encounter such incorrigible, their desire for the sacred Dharma is lost. It is not the fault of the Dharma; it is the fault of individuals." Machik Labdron prophecy.

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Grigoris
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Re: Mixing Buddhist and non-Buddhist Practices?

Post by Grigoris » Mon Sep 01, 2014 4:45 pm

Vajrasvapna wrote:The Bodhicitta chapter of the book "Dakini Teachings: A Collectin of Padmasambhava's Advice to the Dakini Yeshe". In this text, Guru Padmasambhava offers his definitions of the Mahayana concepts, a must read for anyone who has taken the bodhisattva vow.
:twothumbsup:
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde

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