Which Buddhist tradition has treated women the best?

General forum on the teachings of all schools of Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism. Topics specific to one school are best posted in the appropriate sub-forum.
YesheDronmar
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Re: Which Buddhist tradition has treated women the best?

Post by YesheDronmar » Thu Oct 29, 2015 10:59 pm

odysseus wrote:
Tenso wrote:
odysseus wrote:Women bring joy.

:applause:
How do you know? :mrgreen:
Because I'm a male Buddhist. (How do I know?) :mrgreen:
Because our Tantric samaya tells us so ....

YesheDronmar
Posts: 28
Joined: Thu Oct 29, 2015 5:43 am

Re: Which Buddhist tradition has treated women the best?

Post by YesheDronmar » Thu Oct 29, 2015 11:16 pm

I am late to the topic, being a newcomer to Dharma Wheel, and there are several different areas of inquiry here including institutions, organizational power structures, beliefs about the nature of womanhood (gendered bodies and energetics), and some rich material on women in Buddhist history from a variety of lineages.

For me, as a woman on the path, while I have had to study the history (and thus I rejoice in this precious human birth in an auspicious location), what is truly helpful and inspiring are the stories of women who have reached enlightenment (awakening) from a variety of walks of life. It is possible as a householder, a forest dweller, a monastic, and a leader; it is possible as an individual outside of a sangha, an individual inside of a sangha, and as the leader of a sangha. More of these stories and how women have overcome obstacles to the path is the joy. We all have obstacles to overcome in life, obvious, horrible, overt, and covert, subtle, and insidious. Yet, we can take advantage of our circumstances and practice like our (if we have any) is on fire. And, I have to remember that women have been on the path and awakening even though we might not have stories of them or official documentation of it all. Thus each woman's story is most precious to me.

These enlightened women inspire me because they practiced as if their lives depended on it; and in many cases this is literally true. May we practice in these same ways and awaken no matter the form of the body, no matter the outer circumstances.

So please, share more stories of awakened women and resources that we can bring to the path.

Thank you for this rich and illuminating topic.

YesheDronmar
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Joined: Thu Oct 29, 2015 5:43 am

Re: Which Buddhist tradition has treated women the best?

Post by YesheDronmar » Fri Oct 30, 2015 5:31 pm

Cross-posting here with another conversation on DW: "Female Masters of the Past" that will also shed more light here.

http://www.dharmawheel.net/viewtopic.ph ... 30#p308930


Serenity509
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Re: Which Buddhist tradition has treated women the best?

Post by Serenity509 » Sat Nov 07, 2015 6:06 am

Shinran believed his wife to be the incarnation of Kannon.

YesheDronmar
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Re: Which Buddhist tradition has treated women the best?

Post by YesheDronmar » Sun Nov 08, 2015 11:32 pm

rory wrote:and where we are right now is: if you are born in a woman's body you have a couple of thousands of years of cultural patriarchy and misogyny to deal with in Buddhism. That's just the way it is; but the good new is with education and free dissemination of the Dharma via the internet, we don't have to rely on the institutions for Buddhism and we can develop a healthy understanding of the difference between the content and form. For me this meant I dropped my support of the vinaya and nunneries, I remember Faure saying that women instead should develop their own new ways.
gassho
Rory
Have you seen any of the information about the Tibetan Buddhist nuns in Nepal who are doing Kung Fu now? It's quite something.

DGA
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Re: Which Buddhist tradition has treated women the best?

Post by DGA » Mon Nov 09, 2015 2:28 am

rory wrote:and where we are right now is: if you are born in a woman's body you have a couple of thousands of years of cultural patriarchy and misogyny to deal with in Buddhism. That's just the way it is; but the good new is with education and free dissemination of the Dharma via the internet, we don't have to rely on the institutions for Buddhism and we can develop a healthy understanding of the difference between the content and form. For me this meant I dropped my support of the vinaya and nunneries, I remember Faure saying that women instead should develop their own new ways.
gassho
Rory
Isn't Kempon Hokke Shu an institution? Is it a new way founded, organized, or led by women?

http://dharmawheel.net/viewtopic.php?f=59&t=21073

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rory
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Re: Which Buddhist tradition has treated women the best?

Post by rory » Mon Nov 09, 2015 4:59 am

DGA wrote:
rory wrote:and where we are right now is: if you are born in a woman's body you have a couple of thousands of years of cultural patriarchy and misogyny to deal with in Buddhism. That's just the way it is; but the good new is with education and free dissemination of the Dharma via the internet, we don't have to rely on the institutions for Buddhism and we can develop a healthy understanding of the difference between the content and form. For me this meant I dropped my support of the vinaya and nunneries, I remember Faure saying that women instead should develop their own new ways.
gassho
Rory
Isn't Kempon Hokke Shu an institution? Is it a new way founded, organized, or led by women?

http://dharmawheel.net/viewtopic.php?f=59&t=21073
Jikan; I said I don't support the Vinaya and nunneries, what does that have to do with Kempon? You know very well the Vinaya isn't observed in Japan and celibate monks and nuns are rare. I belong to a Nichiren sect, it's a fact that Nichiren wrote to and respected his women followers and was pro-female. What is it about that that you don't understand? That's the best it got in those days.

I've also mentioned that Rissho Kosei Kai, a Lotus Sutra, Nichiren derived new religion, will be led by a woman; Kosho Niwano. Also the Nichiren Shu Order of North America (NONA) is led by Bishop Myokei Caine-Barrett who is a woman and Japanese and African-American (though not without a lot of strum and drang) show me that in Tendai or which Tibetan sect you follow too.
And I agree that Shinran also respected women, in Jodo Shinshu priest's wives are legally acknowledged, better than Tendai, your sect, which to this day does not recognize priests's wives (and other japanese sects do the same as well...ridiculous)
gassho
Rory
Namu Kanzeon Bosatsu
Chih-I:
The Tai-ching states "the women in the realms of Mara, Sakra and Brahma all neither abandoned ( their old) bodies nor received (new) bodies. They all received buddhahood with their current bodies (genshin)" Thus these verses state that the dharma nature is like a great ocean. No right or wrong is preached (within it) Ordinary people and sages are equal, without superiority or inferiority
Paul, Groner "The Lotus Sutra in Japanese Culture"eds. Tanabe p. 58
https://www.tendai-usa.org/

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