"Summarizing" Buddhadharma

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Coëmgenu
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"Summarizing" Buddhadharma

Post by Coëmgenu » Sat Dec 23, 2017 1:13 am

I don't actually claim the ability or qualification to "summarize" Buddhadharma, apologies for my title, but if I may ask, is the below, according to how you understand the dharma, correct?

The profoundly, truly, and absolutely clear mind encounters any thing/dharma whatsoever, and awakening is understood/has happened.
नस्वातो नापिपरतो नद्वाभ्यां नाप्यहेतुतः उत्पन्ना जातु विद्यन्ते भावाः क्वचन केचन
There absolutely are no things, nowhere and none, that arise anew, neither out of themselves, nor out of non-self, nor out of both, nor at random.
सर्वं तथ्यं न वा तथ्यं तथ्यं चातथ्यम् एव च नैवातथ्यं नैव तथ्यम् एतद् बुद्धानुशासनम्
All is so, or all is not so, both so and not so, neither so nor not so. This is the Buddha's teaching.

一切實非實亦實亦非實
非實非非實是名諸佛法

joy&peace
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Re: "Summarizing" Buddhadharma

Post by joy&peace » Mon Dec 25, 2017 6:31 am

I can breathe better now;

This was wonderful, -- than I can express

Namaste,,,,, Om namo Bhaisajyaguru . .

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Astus
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Re: "Summarizing" Buddhadharma

Post by Astus » Mon Dec 25, 2017 9:57 am

Coëmgenu wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 1:13 am
The profoundly, truly, and absolutely clear mind encounters any thing/dharma whatsoever, and awakening is understood/has happened.
That seems to attempt to summarise only awakening, not the whole of Buddhadharma.

1. "profoundly, truly, and absolutely" - What do these adverbs stand for? What is a superficial compared to profound, a false to true, a relative to absolute type of clear mind?

2. "clear mind" - What mind and clean from what?

3. "encounters" - Since mind and thing encounters, does that mean they exist separately? If they are not separate, how can they encounter?

4. "awakening" - Awakening to what?

5. "is understood/has happened" - If understood, was it understood after the encounter, or simultaneously with encounter? If it's happened, has it happened only once or every time there is an encounter?
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

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Coëmgenu
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Re: "Summarizing" Buddhadharma

Post by Coëmgenu » Mon Dec 25, 2017 1:43 pm

Astus wrote:
Mon Dec 25, 2017 9:57 am
Coëmgenu wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 1:13 am
The profoundly, truly, and absolutely clear mind encounters any thing/dharma whatsoever, and awakening is understood/has happened.
That seems to attempt to summarise only awakening, not the whole of Buddhadharma.
Oh certainly, my title was a bit grand-telling.
Astus wrote:
Mon Dec 25, 2017 9:57 am
1. "profoundly, truly, and absolutely" - What do these adverbs stand for? What is a superficial compared to profound, a false to true, a relative to absolute type of clear mind?

2. "clear mind" - What mind and clean from what?
"Clear mind" is just one terminology I have seen used for the "Buddha-mind", to specifically specify it's "Buddha"-likeness. Whether this refers to something like "Pabhassa­ra­midaṃ, bhikkhave, cittaṃ." or specifically the mind of a fully enlightened Buddha, and if there was a difference between the two, that is all up to the reader of the statement in the OP.
Astus wrote:
Mon Dec 25, 2017 9:57 am
3. "encounters" - Since mind and thing encounters, does that mean they exist separately? If they are not separate, how can they encounter?

4. "awakening" - Awakening to what?

5. "is understood/has happened" - If understood, was it understood after the encounter, or simultaneously with encounter? If it's happened, has it happened only once or every time there is an encounter?
Encounters could be more precisely put as "experiences contact", if we want to stick to Buddhist Hybrid English rather than more loose Englishisms. Yogācāra seems to be a system of Buddhadharma-presentation that is all "about" having "encounters"/"contact (i.e. at the sense bases, for instance)" without presuming any "other" of any sort.

The last part of the statement of the OP is to try to navigate between Buddhisms with strong hongaku tendencies and those without. "is understood" is meant to be read as "attained" in the sense of 圓滿菩提. "has occurred" removes the temporality of 圓滿菩提, negating that it may have happened at any one particular "time", as according to some views/explanations.
नस्वातो नापिपरतो नद्वाभ्यां नाप्यहेतुतः उत्पन्ना जातु विद्यन्ते भावाः क्वचन केचन
There absolutely are no things, nowhere and none, that arise anew, neither out of themselves, nor out of non-self, nor out of both, nor at random.
सर्वं तथ्यं न वा तथ्यं तथ्यं चातथ्यम् एव च नैवातथ्यं नैव तथ्यम् एतद् बुद्धानुशासनम्
All is so, or all is not so, both so and not so, neither so nor not so. This is the Buddha's teaching.

一切實非實亦實亦非實
非實非非實是名諸佛法

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Coëmgenu
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Re: "Summarizing" Buddhadharma

Post by Coëmgenu » Mon Dec 25, 2017 1:51 pm

I forgot to address your questions here:
Astus wrote:
Mon Dec 25, 2017 9:57 am
1. "profoundly, truly, and absolutely" - What do these adverbs stand for? What is a superficial compared to profound, a false to true, a relative to absolute type of clear mind?
"Profoundly" is a graft from the "āryāvalokiteśvarabodhisattvo gaṃbhīrāṃ prajñāpāramitāyāṃ caryāṃ caramāṇo" opening of the Heart Sūtra.

"Truly" is a graft of the 真 in 真如 ("true likeness", tathātā).

"Absolute" is a stealing from some surface-level Zen terminology I have picked up, in the sense of the "absolute". Perhaps it is misused.
नस्वातो नापिपरतो नद्वाभ्यां नाप्यहेतुतः उत्पन्ना जातु विद्यन्ते भावाः क्वचन केचन
There absolutely are no things, nowhere and none, that arise anew, neither out of themselves, nor out of non-self, nor out of both, nor at random.
सर्वं तथ्यं न वा तथ्यं तथ्यं चातथ्यम् एव च नैवातथ्यं नैव तथ्यम् एतद् बुद्धानुशासनम्
All is so, or all is not so, both so and not so, neither so nor not so. This is the Buddha's teaching.

一切實非實亦實亦非實
非實非非實是名諸佛法

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Malcolm
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Re: "Summarizing" Buddhadharma

Post by Malcolm » Mon Dec 25, 2017 3:35 pm

Coëmgenu wrote:
Sat Dec 23, 2017 1:13 am
I don't actually claim the ability or qualification to "summarize" Buddhadharma, apologies for my title, but if I may ask, is the below, according to how you understand the dharma, correct?

The profoundly, truly, and absolutely clear mind encounters any thing/dharma whatsoever, and awakening is understood/has happened.
Avoid nonvirtue,
adopt virtue,
know one's mind.
This is the teaching of the Buddhas.


This, at base, is how one summarizes the Dharma.
Buddhahood in This Life
འ༔ ཨ༔ ཧ༔ ཤ༔ ས༔ མ༔


[A]nything at all that is well spoken is the word of the Buddha.

-- Ārya-adhyāśaya-sañcodana-nāma-mahāyāna-sūtra

The different sūtras in accord with the emptiness
taught by the Sugata are definitive in meaning;
One can understand that all of those Dharmas in
which a sentient being, individual, or person are taught are provisional in meaning.

-- Samadhirāja Sūtra

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Vasana
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Re: "Summarizing" Buddhadharma

Post by Vasana » Mon Dec 25, 2017 3:53 pm

“Both formerly and now, it is only suffering that I describe, and the cessation of suffering.” The Buddha
'When alone, watch your mind. When with others, watch your speech'- Old Kadampa saying.

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Re: "Summarizing" Buddhadharma

Post by PeterC » Sat Dec 30, 2017 7:48 am

Summarising can have different purposes. “Ye dharma hetuprabhava...” doesn’t really tell you what the Dharma *is* but it does tell you what the most important part of the Dharma addresses.

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