Differences in the practice of satipatthana among followers of different turns of the wheel of Dharma.

General forum on the teachings of all schools of Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism. Topics specific to one school are best posted in the appropriate sub-forum.
Post Reply
Viach
Posts: 9
Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2018 11:30 am

Differences in the practice of satipatthana among followers of different turns of the wheel of Dharma.

Post by Viach » Sat Jun 30, 2018 2:26 pm

What exactly has changed in the practice of satipatthana since the split into Mahayana and Theravada? What differences were in the practice of satipatthana among followers of the second and third turns of the wheel of Dharma?

User avatar
Josef
Posts: 2149
Joined: Thu Jan 07, 2010 6:44 pm
Contact:

Re: Differences in the practice of satipatthana among followers of different turns of the wheel of Dharma.

Post by Josef » Wed Jul 04, 2018 5:23 am

Viach wrote:
Sat Jun 30, 2018 2:26 pm
What exactly has changed in the practice of satipatthana since the split into Mahayana and Theravada? What differences were in the practice of satipatthana among followers of the second and third turns of the wheel of Dharma?
The only significant differences are shunyata and buddhanature being introduced as aspects of the view.
Kye ma!
The river of continuity is marked by impermanence.
Ceaseless flowing of appearance.
Beautiful and repulsive.
The dance of life and death is a display of the vast expanse.
With gratitude the watcher and the watched pass through the barrier of duality.

Viach
Posts: 9
Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2018 11:30 am

Re: Differences in the practice of satipatthana among followers of different turns of the wheel of Dharma.

Post by Viach » Wed Jul 04, 2018 1:10 pm

Josef wrote:
Wed Jul 04, 2018 5:23 am
The only significant differences are shunyata and buddhanature being introduced as aspects of the view.
How are they used in the practice of satipatthana concretely?

haha
Posts: 186
Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 3:30 pm

Re: Differences in the practice of satipatthana among followers of different turns of the wheel of Dharma.

Post by haha » Wed Jul 04, 2018 1:47 pm

What I have understood on this matter is that one path that leads to end of personal suffering whereas other path leads to Samyaksambhodhi.
“The Perfection of Wisdom in 18,000 Lines”
The Lord: What do you think, Sariputra, does it occur to any of the Disciples and Pratyekabuddhas that “after we have known full enlightenment, we should lead all beings to Nirvana, into the realm of Nirvana which leaves nothing behind”?
Sariputra: No, indeed, O Lord.

The Lord: One should therefore know that this wisdom of the Disciples and Pratyekabuddhas bears no comparison to the wisdom of a Bodhisattva even though developed for one day only. What do you think, Sariputra, does it occur to any of the Disciples and Pratyekabuddhas that “after I have practised the six perfections, matured beings, purified the Buddha-field, perfect the ten powers of a Tathagata, his four grounds of self-confidence, the four analytical knowledges and the eighteen special dharmas of a Buddha, having known full enlightenment i shall lead countless beings to Nirvana”?
Sariputra: No, O Lord.
For the case of Satipatthana, Nikayas present it with emphasizing on “This is not mine, this I am not, this is not my self” which leads to end of klesavarana. On other hand in Perfection of Wisdom, it is presented with emphasizing on “nonapprehension of any dharma” which leads to end of jneyavarana. This is how I have understood.
“The Perfection of Wisdom in 18,000 Lines”
Here a Bodhisattva knows, when he walks, "I walk", when he stands, "I stand", when he sits, "I sit", when he lies down, "I lie down". In whichever position his body may be placed, whether in a good way or not, he knows that it is in that position. And that through nonapprehension (of anything).
The seven Limbs of Enlightenment, i.e. Mindfulness, Investigation into Dharma, Vigour, Joyous Zest, Tranquillity, Concentration, and Evenmindedness. What is mindfulness as a limb of enlightenment? Here a Bodhisattva, who courses in perfect wisdom, develops the limb of enlightenment that is mindfulness, based upon detachment, dispassion, and cessation, dedicated to self-surrender. And so for the other six. And that through nonapprehension.
If you had read “The Perfection of Wisdom Sutra“, you would find one common thing in all chapters that would be Bodhisattva train himself in non-apprehension.

In this world hatred never ceases with hatred
With non hatred it ceases, this is the ancient lore.

Upakilesasuttaṃ

User avatar
Astus
Former staff member
Posts: 6961
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 11:22 pm
Location: Budapest

Re: Differences in the practice of satipatthana among followers of different turns of the wheel of Dharma.

Post by Astus » Wed Jul 04, 2018 6:55 pm

Here is some literature:

Mahaprajnaparamitasastra, ch 31 (Migme Chodron translation: vol 3, p 947-965)
Siksasamuccaya ch. 13 (Alan Wallace translation)
Madhyantavibhaga 4.1 (look into commentaries for details)
Mahayanasutralamkara 18.43-45 (lists 14 unique qualities found in smrtyupasthana as bodhisattva practice)
Dōgen: Sanjūshichi-bon-bodai-bunpō (BDK ed. of Shobogenzo, vol 4, p 3-6)
Niguma: Lady of Illusion, p 95, 98-100
Berzin: The Four Close Placements of Mindfulness in Mahayana
Sujato: A History of Mindfulness, 17.5
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

Post Reply

Return to “Mahāyāna Buddhism”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bristollad, Empty Desire and 56 guests