What does emptiness mean and why does it matter?

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Johnny Dangerous
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Re: What does emptiness mean and why does it matter?

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nichiren-123 wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 2:41 pm
Does emptiness mean that distinctions are all wrong and/or bad and/or illusory? I.e. what is wrong (if anything) with distinctions?

If so then how is the negation of distinctions liberating?
Distinctions are only possible because they are empty.
"...if you think about how many hours, months and years of your life you've spent looking at things, being fascinated by things that have now passed away, then how wonderful to spend even five minutes looking into the nature of your own mind."

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Faith3000
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Re: What does emptiness mean and why does it matter?

Post by Faith3000 »

Emptiness is none-duality or two but not two, or nothing has an independent self-existence. I believe Master Zhiyi from the Tiantai school explained it in one of his writings, The Profound Meaning of the Lotus Sutra, the 10 mystic principles of the essential teaching of the Lotus Sutra. The Buddhist schools of teaching especially the Mahayana schools, the 10 mystic principles are to lead theoretical teachings to lead us understanding of essential teachings but without the essential teachings to begin with we will not seek in the theoretical teachings, therefore, that is called the oneness of teachings or 10 onenesses. Zhanran one of Master Zhiyi's successors during the Tang Dynasty explained it further with his annotations. the oneness of body and mind. 2. the oneness of the internal and the external. 3. The oneness of the result of practice and the true nature of life. 4. he oneness of cause and effect 5. the oneness of the impure and the pure 6. the oneness of life and its environment 7. the oneness of self and others 8. the oneness of thought, word , and deed or you karma 9. the oneness of the provisional and true teachings 10 the oneness of benefits.

All of these onenesses can be viewed as single entity. Therefore, you must realize to live your life from his point forward manifesting the 3 thousand realms in a single moment of life. Such magnificent once you realize the principles of it. :twothumbsup:

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Re: What does emptiness mean and why does it matter?

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Faith3000 wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 8:05 pm
Emptiness is none-duality or two but not two, or nothing has an independent self-existence. I believe Master Zhiyi from the Tiantai school explained it in one of his writings, The Profound Meaning of the Lotus Sutra, the 10 mystic principles of the essential teaching of the Lotus Sutra. The Buddhist schools of teaching especially the Mahayana schools, the 10 mystic principles are to lead theoretical teachings to lead us understanding of essential teachings but without the essential teachings to begin with we will not seek in the theoretical teachings, therefore, that is called the oneness of teachings or 10 onenesses. Zhanran one of Master Zhiyi's successors during the Tang Dynasty explained it further with his annotations. the oneness of body and mind. 2. the oneness of the internal and the external. 3. The oneness of the result of practice and the true nature of life. 4. he oneness of cause and effect 5. the oneness of the impure and the pure 6. the oneness of life and its environment 7. the oneness of self and others 8. the oneness of thought, word , and deed or you karma 9. the oneness of the provisional and true teachings 10 the oneness of benefits.

All of these onenesses can be viewed as single entity. Therefore, you must realize to live your life from his point forward manifesting the 3 thousand realms in a single moment of life. Such magnificent once you realize the principles of it. :twothumbsup:
All of this sounds suspiciously like the third extreme of Nagarjuna's tetralema.
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde

Bundokji
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Re: What does emptiness mean and why does it matter?

Post by Bundokji »

To me, emptiness means that things can be perceived in myriad ways. That does not mean that all perceptions are equally valid. What determines the validity of a particular perception is intention or purpose. For instance, if you want to cure someone who is color blind, it is useful to think of eye consciousness in terms of colors rather than objects.

Why does it matter? why actions do matter? because they have consequences.

All in my opinion.
The cleverest defenders of faith are its greatest enemies: for their subtleties engender doubt and stimulate the mind. -- Will Durant

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Re: What does emptiness mean and why does it matter?

Post by Naawoo »

nichiren-123 wrote:
Mon Nov 05, 2018 2:41 pm
Does emptiness mean that distinctions are all wrong and/or bad and/or illusory? I.e. what is wrong (if anything) with distinctions?

If so then how is the negation of distinctions liberating?
Emptiness is the true nature of everything (material and non-material) including mind.
It matters because without its realization nobody could be truly free from suffering.

Because we don't realize the emptiness, we are easily attached to things and come to have likes and dislikes about them,
which leads us to suffering when we can't afford the likes or can't get out of the dislikes.
Therefore, non-realization of emptiness bears attachment and it turns out to be, after all, suffering.

Distinctions are illusory, which leads to attachments.
So when one realizes the emptiness and gets to have no more distinction/attachment, he/she can be free from all the binding and suffering.

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