Compendium of the Mahayana: Asanga's Mahayanasamgraha and Its Indian and Tibetan Commentaries By: Asanga and Karl Brunn

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Nicholas Weeks
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Re: Compendium of the Mahayana

Post by Nicholas Weeks »

Leo Rivers wrote:
Tue Feb 19, 2019 9:01 pm
Now back to my question, we can objectively track which texts quote which text and the sequence of elaboration on an idea. How's it looking?
If that is your primary interest then Brunnholzl is your man. Every translation of his that I have read is chock full of sage or text X quoted Y text, which was commentary Z from school A. Between his Introduction and notes one can draw all the flow charts of influence one likes.
May all seek, find or follow the Path of Buddhas.

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Re: Mahayana-samgraha

Post by Nicholas Weeks »

More from the Preface:
In this vein, Nguyen (1990, 317 and 336) says:

It is a truism in modern studies of systems of meaning (such as cultures, languages, religions, mythology) that it is necessary first to see such a system of meaning from within, in terms of its own categories and concepts, and its own inherent logic. If on the contrary, we set out by attempting to view a system of meaning in terms of categories fundamentally alien to it, we are in danger of misconstruing the system and constructing a distorted interpretation of it that overlooks its basic meanings and inherent structure. This mistake has often been made in the past in studies of Yogācāra philosophy….
In Buddhist literature itself, texts like the Mahāyānasūtrālaṃkāra, Madhyāntavibhāga, and Mahāyānasaṃgraha are always careful to consider all particular concepts in their integral relationship to the thought-system as a whole. Each of these texts deserves careful study.

Hall (1986, 18–19) adds:

The argument over whether Vijñānavāda is idealistic or realistic bears a marked resemblance to the controversy as to whether Madhyamaka is nihilism or transcendental absolutism.
Mistaking taxonomy for understanding is a fault not limited to modern writers on Buddhism. A similar excessive concern for and trust in doctrinal labels can be seen in ancient Indian philosophers and Tibetan scholastics, and even in the Abhidharma itself. The identification of one school with another (such as that of Vijñānavāda with some Western form of idealism) is not only likely to be misleading; it is only all too often the point at which the argument stops. A more fruitful approach to comparative philosophy would begin by tentatively accepting several comparable philosophies as coherent systems in their own terms, and would proceed to apply their several viewpoints to specific problems of philosophy.
Excerpt From: Asanga & Karl Brunnhölzl. A Compendium of the Mahayana.
May all seek, find or follow the Path of Buddhas.

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Re: Compendium of the Mahayana: Asanga's Mahayanasamgraha and Its Indian and Tibetan Commentaries By: Asanga and Karl Br

Post by Astus »

Tsongkhapafan wrote:
Tue Feb 19, 2019 8:10 pm
I contest the idea that Prasangika is a Gelug idea.
The distinction between Prasangika and Svatantrika is a Tibetan innovation that was emphasised by Tsongkhapa and spread by the Gelugpas. But let me know if you find an Indian source for it.
Buddha Shakyamuni taught the Prasangika view when he delivered the Perfection of Wisdom Sutra at Rajagriha. This view was clarified and expounded by Nagarjuna and his spiritual sons.
Did they call it Prasangika Madhyamaka?
I don't expect everyone to agree with Tsongkhapa but I would expect them to agree with Buddha Shakyamuni, Nagarjuna and Chandrakirti.
Why Candrakirti? He was a marginal teacher until Tsongkhapa.
You seem very dismissive of Chandrakirti's refutation - why?
Not that I don't like what he wrote, but I don't think he is a reliable source to represent Yogacara, hence he did not refute what Yogacarins taught.
Sure, we can study anything, but it's the value of our study that matters. Life is short.
How can you differentiate between valuable and worthless without studying extensively?
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

Nicholas Weeks
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Re: Mahayana-samgraha

Post by Nicholas Weeks »

More of Brunnholzl's Preface:
In fact, Yogācāra does not advocate some ultimately and truly existing consciousness, or some kind of naive idealism or psychologism. Lusthaus (2002, 178) states:

Buddhism is not a psychologism. Even Yogācāra, which does propose to reduce karma and the entirety of the triple world to cognitive factors, is not a psychologism. This is because the point of Buddhist analysis is not the reification of a mental structure or theory of mind, but its erasure. Vasubandhu highlights the closure of cognitive horizons not because such a closure is either desirable or unalterable, but because the closure can only be opened once its all-encompassing complexity and ubiquity is understood and recognized. Yogācāra uses psychologistic arguments to overcome psychological closure, not to enhance it.
May all seek, find or follow the Path of Buddhas.

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Leo Rivers
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Mahayana-samgraha - Lamotte and Keenan versions as PDFs

Post by Leo Rivers »

(La Somme du Grand Vehicule d'Asanga)
by Etienne Lamotte - Associate member of the Insitute of Fiance Professor University of Louvain
Mahayanasamgraha-Asanga-Lamotte
http://www.mediafire.com/file/sgr5h5dag ... e.pdf/file
Image

THE SUMMARY OF THE GREAT VEHICLE by Bodhisattva Asaçga Translated from the Chinese of Paramårtha (Taishø Volume 31, Number 1593) by John P. Keenan Revised Second Edition Numata Center for Buddhist Translation and Research 2003 BDK English Tripi†aka 46-III
GreatVehicleSummary 2003 - Keenan
http://www.mediafire.com/file/nok67epzb ... 3.pdf/file
Image

Have THREE versions to compare on your Idaho end of life spiritual retreat! :reading:

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Leo Rivers
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the MS Mahāyānasaṃgraha’s chapters are a reiteration of the MA Mahāyānābhidharmasūtra

Post by Leo Rivers »

the MS Mahāyānasaṃgraha’s chapter themes are a possible informal reiteration of the MA Mahāyānābhidharmasūtra in that Asanga implies that the MS may be derived from it.
from: ASAṄGA, Bodhisattva. From The Summary of the Great Vehicle. Translated by John P. Keenan. Revised 2nd. Edition. Berkeley, California: Numata, 2003.
chapter I. The Support for the Knowable
chapter II. The Distinguishing Characteristics of the Knowable
chapter III. Entry into the Distinguishing Characteristics of the Knowable
chapter IV. The Distinguishing Characteristics of the Cause and Result of This Entry
chapter V. The Distinguishing Characteristics of the Diverse Practices in Regard to Entering the Cause and Result
chapter VI. The Distinguishing Characteristics of Learning Discipline
chapter VII. The Distinguishing Characteristics of Thought Training
chapter VIII. The Distinguishing Characteristics of Learning Wisdom
chapter IX. The Distinguishing Characteristics of Quiescent Abandonment as a Result of the Trainings
chapter X. The Distinguishing Characteristics of the Excellence of Wisdom
kind of digest for it.

These 10 are features that make a Mahayana text a Mahayana text. :reading:

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Re: Compendium of the Mahayana: Asanga's Mahayanasamgraha and Its Indian and Tibetan Commentaries By: Asanga and Karl Br

Post by Grigoris »

Threads merged and off-topic discussion removed.
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

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Nicholas Weeks
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Re: Compendium of the Mahayana: Asanga's Mahayanasamgraha and Its Indian and Tibetan Commentaries By: Asanga and Karl Br

Post by Nicholas Weeks »

Here is how Bodhisattva Asanga's Introduction begins (vol. 1:153-4):
1. In the Abhidharmamahāyānasūtra, in order to state the mahāyāna’s character of greatness, the bodhisattva Mahāyānasupratipanna said the following in the presence of the Bhagavān: With regard to the mahāyāna, the teachings of the buddha bhagavāns are distinguished through ten kinds of distinctive features.

2. These [features] are as follows:

(1) The teachings of the buddha bhagavāns that are distinguished through the distinctive feature that consists of the foundation of what is to be known
(2) The teachings of the buddha bhagavāns that are distinguished through the distinctive feature that consists of the characteristics of what is to be known
(3) The teachings that are distinguished through the distinctive feature that consists of penetrating6 these characteristics of what is to be known
(4) The teachings that are distinguished through the distinctive feature that consists of the causes and results of this penetration
(5) The teachings that are distinguished through the distinctive feature that consists of the divisions of cultivating these causes and results
(6) The teachings that are distinguished through the distinctive feature that consists of superior discipline within these divisions of cultivation
(7) The teachings that are distinguished through the distinctive feature that consists of superior mind
(8) The teachings that are distinguished through the distinctive feature that consists of superior prajñā
(9) The teachings that are distinguished through the distinctive feature that consists of the relinquishment that is the result of this [training]
(10) The teachings that are distinguished through the distinctive feature that consists of the wisdom that is the result of this [training].

These instructions of the words of the sūtras of the buddha bhagavāns express that the mahāyāna is indeed the speech of the Buddha.
May all seek, find or follow the Path of Buddhas.

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Re: Compendium of the Mahayana: Asanga's Mahayanasamgraha and Its Indian and Tibetan Commentaries By: Asanga and Karl Br

Post by Nicholas Weeks »

Asanga continues:
3. How do they express [this]? Through these instructions in that fashion, the ten topics that are not taught in the śrāvakayāna are taught in the mahāyāna as follows:

(1) The ālaya-consciousness is taught as the foundation of what is to be known.
(2) The three natures—the dependent, the imaginary, and the perfect [natures]—are taught as the characteristics of what is to be known.
(3) Mere cognizance is taught as penetrating the characteristics of what is to be known.
(4) The six pāramitās are taught as the causes and results of penetrating these [characteristics].
(5) The ten bhūmis of bodhisattvas are taught as the divisions of cultivating the causes and results of this [penetration].
(6) The bodhisattva vows9 are taught as the superior discipline within this [division of cultivation].
(7) Samādhis such as Heroic Stride and Sky Treasure are taught as the superior mind within this [division of cultivation].
(8) Nonconceptual wisdom is taught as the superior prajñā [within this division of cultivation].
(9) The nonabiding nirvāṇa is taught as the relinquishment that is the result of this [training].
(10) The three kāyas of a buddha—the svābhāvika[kāya], the sambhogakāya, and the nirmāṇakāya—are taught as the wisdom that is the result of this [training].
May all seek, find or follow the Path of Buddhas.

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Re: Compendium of the Mahayana: Asanga's Mahayanasamgraha and Its Indian and Tibetan Commentaries By: Asanga and Karl Br

Post by Nicholas Weeks »

Asanga ends his Introduction on page 155 of vol. i - (I have skipped a little):
5. “Why is the order of these ten topics taught in such a way?”

(1) At the beginning, based on becoming experts in the causes of phenomena, bodhisattvas should first become experts in dependent origination.
(2) Thereafter, in order to become experts in relinquishing the flaws of the extremes of superimposition and denial, they should become experts in the characteristics of these dependently originating phenomena.
(3) Bodhisattvas who have trained in this fashion should realize the characteristics that they have apprehended—through that, their minds will be liberated from the obscurations.
(4) Thereafter, through realizing the characteristics of what is to be known and based on the pure superior intention, they should practice in order to realize the six pāramitās in which they trained previously.
(5) Following that, they should cultivate the six pāramitās embraced by the pure superior intention through dividing them into the ten bhūmis for three incalculable eons.
(6)–(8) After that, they should fully complete the three trainings of bodhisattvas.
(9)–(10) Having fully completed them, they should fully and perfectly awaken to the result of this, which is nirvāṇa and unsurpassable completely perfect awakening. This is how the order of these ten topics is taught. The entire mahāyāna is fully complete in this instruction.
May all seek, find or follow the Path of Buddhas.

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