What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

General forum on the teachings of all schools of Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism. Topics specific to one school are best posted in the appropriate sub-forum.
Dgj
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What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by Dgj » Fri May 22, 2020 1:52 am

What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?
Don't assume my words are correct. Do your research.

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Queequeg
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by Queequeg » Fri May 22, 2020 4:08 am

None of them? All of them? Some of them?

I don't know if there is a simple teaching in Buddhism that doesn't have infinite detail.



Until it stops.
Those who, even with distracted minds,
Entered a stupa compound
And chanted but once, “Namo Buddhaya!”
Have certainly attained the path of the buddhas.

-Lotus Sutra, Expedient Means Chapter

There are beings with little dust in their eyes who are falling away because they do not hear the Dhamma. There will be those who will understand the Dhamma.
-Ayacana Sutta

Dgj
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by Dgj » Fri May 22, 2020 4:25 am

Queequeg wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 4:08 am
None of them? All of them? Some of them?

I don't know if there is a simple teaching in Buddhism that doesn't have infinite detail.

...

Until it stops.
Thanks. All can be detailed at great length, sure, but some can be learned and practiced sufficiently with an extremely small amount of detail. Namo Amitabha, for example.
Don't assume my words are correct. Do your research.

SteRo
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by SteRo » Fri May 22, 2020 4:53 am

Dgj wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 1:52 am
What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?
Taking refuge and practicing the sutta or sutra that resonates with this sphere of experience.

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Queequeg
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by Queequeg » Fri May 22, 2020 4:56 am

Dgj wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 4:25 am
Queequeg wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 4:08 am
None of them? All of them? Some of them?

I don't know if there is a simple teaching in Buddhism that doesn't have infinite detail.

...

Until it stops.
Thanks. All can be detailed at great length, sure, but some can be learned and practiced sufficiently with an extremely small amount of detail. Namo Amitabha, for example.
I was trying to be cute with that reply. But more seriously, Buddhasmirti, even as simple as Namo Amitabha, is most definitely like diving into a mandelbrot graph. Just because one does not actually explore it deeply, doesn't mean those depths are not there.

Are you asking about simplicity just at a superficial level? Take your pick of the single-practice teachings.
Those who, even with distracted minds,
Entered a stupa compound
And chanted but once, “Namo Buddhaya!”
Have certainly attained the path of the buddhas.

-Lotus Sutra, Expedient Means Chapter

There are beings with little dust in their eyes who are falling away because they do not hear the Dhamma. There will be those who will understand the Dhamma.
-Ayacana Sutta

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PadmaVonSamba
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by PadmaVonSamba » Fri May 22, 2020 5:43 am

I think, to be “form” or “school” of Buddhism
inevitably involves complication, because it is precisely the practices, rituals, and various characteristics which are what make something a “school” or give it its “form”.

Perhaps it’s better to ask what is the minimal amount of effort one needs to make in order to practice Buddhism.
In terms of formal practice, meditate.
In terms of everyday living, be compassionate.

A well known teaching is this:
“To avoid doing evil,
To do what is good,
To cultivate one’s mind,
These are the teachings of the Buddha”
。。。
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Steel
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by Steel » Fri May 22, 2020 7:15 am

No doubt, Jodo Shinshu.

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LastLegend
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by LastLegend » Fri May 22, 2020 12:34 pm

Dgj wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 1:52 am
What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?
Believe in Buddha nature and and find a practice.
Make personal vows.

End of the day: I don’t know.

avatamsaka3
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by avatamsaka3 » Fri May 22, 2020 12:38 pm

Train the mind to be still and focused. Train body, speech, and mind to not cause harm. Understand how things exist.

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Astus
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by Astus » Fri May 22, 2020 3:03 pm

Dgj wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 1:52 am
What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?
The four noble truths are said to be both the summary (SN 56.31) and the all encompassing (MN 28) teaching of the Buddha.
What is highlighted in Mahayana as the essential teaching is prajnaparamita (e.g. Heart Sutra), and then that is transformed into teachings like Zen (e.g. Platform Sutra, ch 2) and Mahamudra (e.g. Jewel Ornament of Liberation, ch 17).
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

Dgj
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by Dgj » Fri May 22, 2020 3:43 pm

SteRo wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 4:53 am
Dgj wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 1:52 am
What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?
Taking refuge and practicing the sutta or sutra that resonates with this sphere of experience.
:thumbsup:
Don't assume my words are correct. Do your research.

Dgj
Posts: 195
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2016 10:34 pm

Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by Dgj » Fri May 22, 2020 4:01 pm

Queequeg wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 4:56 am
Dgj wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 4:25 am
Queequeg wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 4:08 am
None of them? All of them? Some of them?

I don't know if there is a simple teaching in Buddhism that doesn't have infinite detail.

...

Until it stops.
Thanks. All can be detailed at great length, sure, but some can be learned and practiced sufficiently with an extremely small amount of detail. Namo Amitabha, for example.
I was trying to be cute with that reply. But more seriously, Buddhasmirti, even as simple as Namo Amitabha, is most definitely like diving into a mandelbrot graph. Just because one does not actually explore it deeply, doesn't mean those depths are not there.

Are you asking about simplicity just at a superficial level? Take your pick of the single-practice teachings.
Oh :jumping:

I'm asking about trainings that can be considered sufficient and yet are simple. Namo Amitabha is deep and sufficient even if one knows and follows only the five precepts and praises Amitabha by chanting Namo Amitabha, they will get to the Pure Land. This is far from superficial. It is also not to deny the great depth surrounding this simple version. Far from it, I understand there is much more information and practices and doctrine to learn and would never deny their importance.

Rather than superficial, I mean non complicated.

Let's make it a hypothetical scenario like something from Journey to the West (currently re reading, one of my favorite books :smile: :heart:):

What types of Buddhism, other than Pure Land, could you teach someone if Kuan Yin showed up and told you you had to do it in ten minutes and it had to be enough that the student would need no further teaching and could become enlightened?

Also if you could list the single practice teachings that would be great, I'm not familiar with them.
Don't assume my words are correct. Do your research.

Dgj
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by Dgj » Fri May 22, 2020 4:06 pm

PadmaVonSamba wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 5:43 am

I think, to be “form” or “school” of Buddhism
inevitably involves complication, because it is precisely the practices, rituals, and various characteristics which are what make something a “school” or give it its “form”.


Perhaps it’s better to ask what is the minimal amount of effort one needs to make in order to practice Buddhism.
In terms of formal practice, meditate.
In terms of everyday living, be compassionate.

A well known teaching is this:
“To avoid doing evil,
To do what is good,
To cultivate one’s mind,
These are the teachings of the Buddha”
。。。
Excellent! Love that quote. Memorized it in Pali:

Sabbapapassa akaranam
Kusalassa upasampada
Sacittapariyodapanam
Etam Buddhana sasanam

That said, I am certainly not looking for minimal effort. Only minimal complexity.
Don't assume my words are correct. Do your research.

Dgj
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by Dgj » Fri May 22, 2020 4:08 pm

Steel wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 7:15 am
No doubt, Jodo Shinshu.
:thumbsup:
Don't assume my words are correct. Do your research.

Dgj
Posts: 195
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by Dgj » Fri May 22, 2020 4:09 pm

LastLegend wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 12:34 pm
Dgj wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 1:52 am
What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?
Believe in Buddha nature and and find a practice.
Thanks but what are some simple practices?
Don't assume my words are correct. Do your research.

Dgj
Posts: 195
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2016 10:34 pm

Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by Dgj » Fri May 22, 2020 4:10 pm

avatamsaka3 wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 12:38 pm
Train the mind to be still and focused. Train body, speech, and mind to not cause harm. Understand how things exist.
Very nice thank you :smile:
Don't assume my words are correct. Do your research.

Dgj
Posts: 195
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2016 10:34 pm

Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by Dgj » Fri May 22, 2020 4:10 pm

Astus wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 3:03 pm
Dgj wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 1:52 am
What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?
The four noble truths are said to be both the summary (SN 56.31) and the all encompassing (MN 28) teaching of the Buddha.
What is highlighted in Mahayana as the essential teaching is prajnaparamita (e.g. Heart Sutra), and then that is transformed into teachings like Zen (e.g. Platform Sutra, ch 2) and Mahamudra (e.g. Jewel Ornament of Liberation, ch 17).
Fantastic thank you! The fourth noble truth includes the eightfold path, technically, no?
Last edited by Dgj on Fri May 22, 2020 4:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Don't assume my words are correct. Do your research.

Tiago Simões
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by Tiago Simões » Fri May 22, 2020 4:11 pm

I recommend this series of videos:



As Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse puts it: "HINAMUDRA: A teaching on the theory and practice of Buddhism for lethargic, indulgent, lazy, depressed and spaced out couch potatoes, for obsessive blue-collar and white-collar busy-bees feeding an army of family members, for those who eat meat, drink alcohol, have all kinds of kinky fantasies, and just keep going to teachings but never practice — but who nevertheless have fervent devotion towards wisdom, the Buddha, and the path of Buddhism — from one who is seasoned and experienced in all the above forms, knows them well, and lives with them all the time."

http://www.siddharthasintent.org/teachi ... institute/

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PadmaVonSamba
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by PadmaVonSamba » Fri May 22, 2020 4:13 pm

Dgj wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 4:06 pm
I am certainly not looking for minimal effort. Only minimal complexity.
If you think about it, they are two ends of the same rope.
If a practice isn’t complicated, it shouldn’t take much effort. If an uncomplicated practice seems to take a lot of effort, very likely you aren’t doing it correctly.
The two examples I’m thinking of are
mindfulness and compassion.
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LastLegend
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Re: What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?

Post by LastLegend » Fri May 22, 2020 4:16 pm

Dgj wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 4:09 pm
LastLegend wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 12:34 pm
Dgj wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 1:52 am
What are the most minimalist or simplest forms or schools of Buddhism?
Believe in Buddha nature and and find a practice.
Thanks but what are some simple practices?
I don’t know. What do you do best? Meditate or chant or ask yourself questions.

It’s your mind you should how it functions. Awareness is often described here. What is it in all of that perceptions and activity in mind?
Make personal vows.

End of the day: I don’t know.

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