Some Questions I have about Buddhism

General forum on the teachings of all schools of Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism. Topics specific to one school are best posted in the appropriate sub-forum.
Artziebetter1
Posts: 103
Joined: Wed May 13, 2020 12:09 pm

Re: Some Questions I have about Buddhism

Post by Artziebetter1 »

avatamsaka3 wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 6:38 am
meaning that we can never reach a beginning to our rebirths,this is logically faulty
You haven't given a reason that explains why a world of infinite causes is logically faulty.
say you go back into the number of births;eventually there should be a first to the causal chain as all successive chains have a beginning
Saying this doesn't make it so.
People like anandamayi ma or the shankaracharya of the Kamakoti mutt who is a reincarnation of Adi Shankara
I'm sure these people are worthy of respect in their traditions. But I have no idea why you would consider them tulkus. Rebirth, if correct, is a universal phenomenon that all beings can investigate and experience.
a Buddha has no vijnana
You have no vijnana. Furthermore, the following was quoted for you earlier in a related post:
Buddhahood is the domain of omniscient jnana
and not within the scope of the three forms of prajna.
Therefore the jnanakaya should be understood
as being inconceivable for beings...

Never is their indifference something unaware and
their mighty aspiration is never subject to degradation;
nor is their diligence, their memory, their prajna,
their perfect liberation and perception:
the jnana of liberation.
Thanks for the quotation.so I guess a Buddha has inconceivable awareness and perception?

I think that the idea that a infinity can never be reached backwards or forwards in a successive chain needs no explanation,it’s so obvious.Infinity
avatamsaka3 wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 6:38 am
meaning that we can never reach a beginning to our rebirths,this is logically faulty
You haven't given a reason that explains why a world of infinite causes is logically faulty.
say you go back into the number of births;eventually there should be a first to the causal chain as all successive chains have a beginning
Saying this doesn't make it so.
People like anandamayi ma or the shankaracharya of the Kamakoti mutt who is a reincarnation of Adi Shankara
I'm sure these people are worthy of respect in their traditions. But I have no idea why you would consider them tulkus. Rebirth, if correct, is a universal phenomenon that all beings can investigate and experience.
a Buddha has no vijnana
You have no vijnana. Furthermore, the following was quoted for you earlier in a related post:
Buddhahood is the domain of omniscient jnana
and not within the scope of the three forms of prajna.
Therefore the jnanakaya should be understood
as being inconceivable for beings...

Never is their indifference something unaware and
their mighty aspiration is never subject to degradation;
nor is their diligence, their memory, their prajna,
their perfect liberation and perception:
the jnana of liberation.
Thanks for the quotation.so I guess a Buddha has inconceivable awareness and perception?

I think that the idea that a infinity can never be reached backwards or forwards in a successive chain needs no explanation,it’s so obvious.Infinity implies boundlessness and this is impossible in reality.

I am sure you have heard of Hilberts hotel.Infinity doesn’t exist as a quantity.it cannot exist In reality.how hard is it to understand that infinite regress is impossible)
avatamsaka3
Posts: 590
Joined: Mon Apr 08, 2019 6:11 am

Re: Some Questions I have about Buddhism

Post by avatamsaka3 »

I am sure you have heard of Hilberts hotel.Infinity doesn’t exist as a quantity.it cannot exist In reality.how hard is it to understand that infinite regress is impossible)
I had not heard of it before reading your post. From what I read, it does not seem to disprove a universe made of infinite causal chains. Again, you haven't laid out a rigorous argument for your position. If you do that, perhaps others can help more.
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Aryjna
Posts: 1244
Joined: Mon Mar 27, 2017 12:45 pm

Re: Some Questions I have about Buddhism

Post by Aryjna »

Artziebetter1 wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 11:52 pm I think that the idea that a infinity can never be reached backwards or forwards in a successive chain needs no explanation,it’s so obvious.Infinity implies boundlessness and this is impossible in reality.

I am sure you have heard of Hilberts hotel.Infinity doesn’t exist as a quantity.it cannot exist In reality.how hard is it to understand that infinite regress is impossible)
Of course it does not really exist, that is the main point of the Mahayana.

As for your example, it is not really that obvious at all, it is only obvious within a limited conceptual framework, in which that paradox is formulated.

But I don't know what you expect to hear here. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeno%27s_paradoxes According to these paradoxes, you shouldn't be able to get off your chair.
Bristollad
Posts: 640
Joined: Fri Aug 21, 2015 11:39 am

Re: Some Questions I have about Buddhism

Post by Bristollad »

I think that the idea that a infinity can never be reached backwards or forwards in a successive chain needs no explanation,it’s so obvious.
Infinity doesn’t exist as a quantity.
For these very reasons, the idea of a first or last cause is nonsense. It's like children boasting they know the biggest number or the smallest number. But we soon learn that real numbers can always be added to or divided - there is no biggest or largest possible, no first or last number.
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PadmaVonSamba
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Joined: Sat May 14, 2011 1:41 am

Re: Some Questions I have about Buddhism

Post by PadmaVonSamba »

That’s about all my doubts.If I hear some good replies I would be established in my Buddhism and would return permanently.I feel my time out has only actually strengthened my resolve as I realized other religions just aren’t for me.
Would you need to know the meaning of “beginningless time” before you could eat a meal, or attend to a bleeding wound, or help a sick person?

One can ponder the origins of the universe forever. It’s great fun, as far as I’m concerned. But even if one finds out the true answer, it won’t help them one way or another, as far as the purposes of Buddhism are concerned.

While it is intellectually stimulating and no doubt has many important implications scientifically, if being unresolved is a pivotal factor in whether or not to practice Dharma, then I’m not sure how much one is going to get out of Buddhism.
Be kindness
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