The term Puja

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lotwell
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The term Puja

Post by lotwell » Sat Dec 15, 2012 4:32 pm

The term Puja seems to be used in a wide many ways. I take it that it's from Sanskrit?

What is the corresponding Tibetan term?

How does the way we describe practice with terms like Puja, Sadhana, etc. affect our understanding of them?

Ltwll

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windsweptliberty
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Re: The term Puja

Post by windsweptliberty » Sat Dec 15, 2012 7:49 pm

Lion's roar: "Puja (literally an offering) is a Meditation Ritual on one of the Bodhisattvas or Buddhas. It is a ceremony in which prayers are offered to the Buddhas to request their blessings or invoke their help." There are different Pujas for different times in ones life and can be performed upon request. :heart:

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Grigoris
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Re: The term Puja

Post by Grigoris » Sat Dec 15, 2012 8:59 pm

The corresponding Tibetan term is tsog/tsok.
:namaste:
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udawa
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Re: The term Puja

Post by udawa » Sat Dec 15, 2012 9:33 pm

gregkavarnos wrote:The corresponding Tibetan term is tsog/tsok.
:namaste:
Tsog (tshogs) is the Tibetan translation of gana (as in ganacakra), which is basically the idea of a gathering or assembly.

Yes, puja is Sanskrit. I believe the Tibetan translation of puja is cho (mchod).

D
Edwards: You are a philosopher. Dr Johnson: I have tried too in my time to be a philosopher; but, I don't know how, cheerfulness was always breaking in.

ngodrup
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Re: The term Puja

Post by ngodrup » Sun Dec 16, 2012 5:44 am

It is my understanding that the Sanskrit word puja can be translated
in two different ways: "to please" and "to give birth to merit."
The second approach seems more impersonal, therefore more
suitable for Buddhist usage.

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Konchog1
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Re: The term Puja

Post by Konchog1 » Sun Dec 16, 2012 7:50 am

The Tibetian is mchod-pa in Wylie

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Without attachment, self-liberating, like a snake in a knot.
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Grigoris
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Re: The term Puja

Post by Grigoris » Sun Dec 16, 2012 4:57 pm

udawa wrote:
gregkavarnos wrote:The corresponding Tibetan term is tsog/tsok.
:namaste:
Tsog (tshogs) is the Tibetan translation of gana (as in ganacakra), which is basically the idea of a gathering or assembly.

Yes, puja is Sanskrit. I believe the Tibetan translation of puja is cho (mchod).

D
I stand corrected! :emb: I goofed up because we always refer to the ganachakra puja as a tsog!
:namaste:
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde

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kalden yungdrung
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Re: The term Puja

Post by kalden yungdrung » Sun Dec 16, 2012 5:03 pm

Tashi delek,

Yes Tsog is the Tibetan genaral translation of a Ganachakra and not per se a Puja.

ཚོགས་ཀྱི་འཁོར་ལོ། tshogs kyi 'khor lo would be the Tibetan translation about offerings.

A Puja do i understand as more a worship to the Yidams etc..
So offering that would be the core for these kind of rituals like visualistaions of perfect universes and offering them afterwards.

Other ritual objects are blessed by mantras before offered.
The Chodpa, practtioner of Chod, does offer his body.

The most welknown of a Ganachakra would be those of the Indian Mahasiddhas.
I guess so that these matters do belong to Tantra and are very benefitial if practiced well.

Mutsog marro
KY
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udawa
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Re: The term Puja

Post by udawa » Sun Dec 16, 2012 5:53 pm

kalden yungdrung wrote:Tashi delek,

Yes Tsog is the Tibetan genaral translation of a Ganachakra and not per se a Puja.

ཚོགས་ཀྱི་འཁོར་ལོ། tshogs kyi 'khor lo would be the Tibetan translation about offerings.

A Puja do i understand as more a worship to the Yidams etc..
So offering that would be the core for these kind of rituals like visualistaions of perfect universes and offering them afterwards.

Other ritual objects are blessed by mantras before offered.
The Chodpa, practtioner of Chod, does offer his body.

The most welknown of a Ganachakra would be those of the Indian Mahasiddhas.
I guess so that these matters do belong to Tantra and are very benefitial if practiced well.

Mutsog marro
KY
tshogs kyi 'khor lo is the Tibetan translation of ganacakra.

Puja is a general term used in both mahayana and vajrayana. The classic format is the 7 fold puja (homage, offering, confession, rejoicing, requesting the turning of the Dharma wheel, asking the Buddhas not to pass into Nirvana, dedication of punya). I guess the best known version is that found in Santideva's Bodhicaryavatara.

D
Edwards: You are a philosopher. Dr Johnson: I have tried too in my time to be a philosopher; but, I don't know how, cheerfulness was always breaking in.

udawa
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Re: The term Puja

Post by udawa » Sun Dec 16, 2012 6:12 pm

gregkavarnos wrote:
udawa wrote:
gregkavarnos wrote:The corresponding Tibetan term is tsog/tsok.
:namaste:
Tsog (tshogs) is the Tibetan translation of gana (as in ganacakra), which is basically the idea of a gathering or assembly.

Yes, puja is Sanskrit. I believe the Tibetan translation of puja is cho (mchod).

D
I stand corrected! :emb: I goofed up because we always refer to the ganachakra puja as a tsog!
:namaste:
Yes, it is confusing. You often hear people talk about tsok pujas. I wonder if this is an expression Tibetans started to use after they found themselves living in exile in India?
Edwards: You are a philosopher. Dr Johnson: I have tried too in my time to be a philosopher; but, I don't know how, cheerfulness was always breaking in.

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