When you first started... (lightweight question)

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Vasana
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by Vasana » Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:39 pm

I wish I'd known that the 4 thoughts that turn the mind to Dharma are just as important to reflect on through out the entite path no matter what higher teaching or training on meditation you've recieved.
'When alone, watch your mind. When with others, watch your speech'- Old Kadampa saying.

Simon E.
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by Simon E. » Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:42 pm

1) Read what is essential..don't reduce your Dharma engagement to books and cognitions.

2) Spend as much actual real meatspace time with as many teachers and students as you can.

3) Do not attempt to practice the Vajrayana without a living meatspace teacher.

4) Never assume that you can judge your fellow students on your own subjective standards concerning height, weight, colour, nationality, diet, temperament or personality type. In particular, do not assume that they will share your ideas of what constitutes 'niceness'.
If you use the word 'mind' without defining your terms I will ask you politely for a definition. :smile:
This is not to be awkward. But it's really not self-explanatory.

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Mantrik
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by Mantrik » Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:13 pm

Vasana wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:39 pm
I wish I'd known that the 4 thoughts that turn the mind to Dharma are just as important to reflect on through out the entite path no matter what higher teaching or training on meditation you've recieved.

If you mean these Four Thoughts, then yes I agree:

http://www.rigpawiki.org/index.php?title=Four_thoughts

For myself: 'Practise Patience'.
http://www.khyung.com

Micchāmi Dukkaḍaṃ (मिच्छामि दुक्कडम्)

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PuerAzaelis
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by PuerAzaelis » Thu Nov 30, 2017 4:03 pm

Lingpupa wrote:
Mon Aug 07, 2017 12:31 pm
When you first got started in the Dharma, what was the one thing you would most have liked to be told at the beginning that would have made your life, or even your progress in the Dharma, easier? Something trivial, like "Eat a good lunch at this centre, because supper is usually very small"? Or something deep and meaningful?
1) Pick one thing, get proper instructions, then do it consistently. Become an expert in that one thing.
Anonymous X wrote:
Wed Aug 09, 2017 4:53 am
... Perhaps you don't get what I'm saying.
2) Also - before even beginning on practice, learn how to listen to dharma. Figure out who is the student and who is the teacher, who is the yellow belt and who is the brown belt. Turn the pot the right way up, clean it so it smells nice, make sure it does not have a hole in it.

3) Always begin again from scratch tomorrow.
Generally, enjoyment of speech is the gateway to poor [results]. So it becomes the foundation for generating all negative emotional states. Jampel Pawo, The Certainty of the Diamond Mind

For posts from this user, see Karma Dondrup Tashi account.

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Josef
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by Josef » Fri Dec 01, 2017 1:41 am

I'm not sure anyone could have told me anything at the beginning that would have worked or helped much.
For me, it was time, and finding out for myself that I was full of shit over and over again.
It's always been easy for me to gather and collect teachings and intellectual knowledge but every seven years or so I am reminded of how little I really know.
Being stubborn makes it hard for me to listen, but it also makes it impossible for me to stop learning about and confronting my own flaws.
Kye ma!
The river of continuity is marked by impermanence.
Ceaseless flowing of appearance.
Beautiful and repulsive.
The dance of life and death is a display of the vast expanse.
With gratitude the watcher and the watched pass through the barrier of duality.

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daibunny
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by daibunny » Fri Dec 01, 2017 1:55 am

Relax. Practice is not a life and death struggle against yourself, its more about just doing the method and relaxing and taking yourself as you are. If you just do the method, relax and give yourself a good helping of metta, you will make the road alot easier. After all practice never ends as long as there is life in your body, you will never be done, so why hurry to get there?
So relax and give your self lots of metta. Being tense about progress or goals just adds an extra layer of difficulty.

A teacher of mine included something like this in his practice instruction:

"Practice mainly consists of concentrating on your meditation object and then coming back to it. So if you are doing those two things you are doing it right."
Nothing remains
Of the house that I was born in--
Fireflies.

- Santoka, 1882-1940
Mountain Tasting: Zen Haiku by Santoka Taneda, 1980, p.48
Translated by John Stevens

amanitamusc
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by amanitamusc » Fri Dec 01, 2017 2:09 am

Lingpupa wrote:
Mon Aug 07, 2017 12:31 pm
When you first got started in the Dharma, what was the one thing you would most have liked to be told at the beginning that would have made your life, or even your progress in the Dharma, easier? Something trivial, like "Eat a good lunch at this centre, because supper is usually very small"? Or something deep and meaningful?
Drink boiled water.

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KeithA
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by KeithA » Fri Dec 01, 2017 2:11 am

Not a practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism, but I have always found this advice useful:
Be patient
Be persistent
Be kind to yourself
Good luck and thanks for practicing,
Keith

_/|\_

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TharpaChodron
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by TharpaChodron » Fri Dec 01, 2017 4:50 am

:good:
daibunny wrote:
Fri Dec 01, 2017 1:55 am
Relax. Practice is not a life and death struggle against yourself, its more about just doing the method and relaxing and taking yourself as you are. If you just do the method, relax and give yourself a good helping of metta, you will make the road alot easier. After all practice never ends as long as there is life in your body, you will never be done, so why hurry to get there?
So relax and give your self lots of metta. Being tense about progress or goals just adds an extra layer of difficulty.

A teacher of mine included something like this in his practice instruction:

"Practice mainly consists of concentrating on your meditation object and then coming back to it. So if you are doing those two things you are doing it right."
Yes, it's not a race to enlightenment. There's no ego involved, or shouldn't be. The Dharma is there for you to help yourself. But don't use that as an excuse to be lazy. Be inspired by others but don't let their example discourage you from focusing on your own path.

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heart
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by heart » Fri Dec 01, 2017 5:56 am

"Better 10 minutes happy practice than 1 hour so and so practice", a very helpful advice from my teacher. Wish I got that in the beginning.

/magnus
"We are all here to help each other go through this thing, whatever it is."
~Kurt Vonnegut

"The principal practice is Guruyoga. But we need to understand that any secondary practice combined with Guruyoga becomes a principal practice." ChNNR (Teachings on Thun and Ganapuja)

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srivijaya
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by srivijaya » Fri Dec 01, 2017 9:44 am

Lingpupa wrote:
Mon Aug 07, 2017 12:31 pm
When you first got started in the Dharma, what was the one thing you would most have liked to be told at the beginning that would have made your life, or even your progress in the Dharma, easier? Something trivial, like "Eat a good lunch at this centre, because supper is usually very small"? Or something deep and meaningful?
Stop being like a kid in a sweet shop. Never consider so-called 'basic' teachings as lacking in profundity and ignoring them in favour of the so-called 'advanced' stuff. Find out, understand and implement what the man himself actually said (not what you think he said because it's what someone you respect sort of told you).

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Vasana
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by Vasana » Fri Dec 01, 2017 9:49 am

heart wrote:
Fri Dec 01, 2017 5:56 am
"Better 10 minutes happy practice than 1 hour so and so practice", a very helpful advice from my teacher. Wish I got that in the beginning.

/magnus
Oh yeah, this. Also better to have a shortened practice in a calm or normal mindset / energy level rather than overexerting and pushing for a longer practice when you're already too agitated.

Also ties in with recognizing the need for a slow transition between the hustle and bustle of samsara and starting a retreat. Jumping in head first to a retreat setting with set sessions without moving from higher to lower gears first can be counterproductive. In short, be aware of your own energetic needs and be willing to adjust your practice accordingly when needed.
'When alone, watch your mind. When with others, watch your speech'- Old Kadampa saying.

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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by Johnny Dangerous » Fri Dec 01, 2017 10:11 am

Ideas, beliefs, opinions and 'shoulds' are fine, but don't waste time worrying about them.
"it must be coming from the mouthy mastermind of raunchy rapper, Johnny Dangerous”

-Jeff H.

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daibunny
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by daibunny » Fri Dec 01, 2017 1:45 pm

KeithA wrote:
Fri Dec 01, 2017 2:11 am
Not a practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism, but I have always found this advice useful:
Be patient
Be persistent
Be kind to yourself
Good luck and thanks for practicing,
Keith

_/|\_
Excellent. Beautiful post. This is what i would have said if i werent such a blabbermouth :bow:
Nothing remains
Of the house that I was born in--
Fireflies.

- Santoka, 1882-1940
Mountain Tasting: Zen Haiku by Santoka Taneda, 1980, p.48
Translated by John Stevens

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weitsicht
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by weitsicht » Fri Dec 01, 2017 3:06 pm

Allow yourself leting go. If you are not ready for that then stay away, look out for something else, do not pursue the Dhamma path.

Take your time. Allow things to ripen. Grass doesn't grow faster when pulling it.

You will be a different Person. You'll Need to be very honest with yourself. Accept that. Do not choose the Dhamma path accidentially.

Be prepared that Terms will be used differently to what you are used to. That Terms that had Little significance will be used inflationally. Start studying to get into this world but also watch carefully when that's enough. Then stop studying.

There are things beyond logic and common sense. You'll Need to allow yourself opening to that, without overly enthusiasm.

Don't mix the yanas

Check out carefully before (if) you commit.

You may read from that post that this is higher yana stuff. Call ist dzogchen or not. Like it, like it not.
Ho! All the possible appearances and existences of samsara and nirvana have the same source, yet two paths and two results arise as the magical display of awareness and unawareness.
HO NANG SRI KHOR DAE THAMCHE KUN ZHI CHIG LAM NYI DRAE BU NYI RIG DANG MA RIG CHOM THRUL TE

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weitsicht
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by weitsicht » Fri Dec 01, 2017 3:09 pm

I forgot one:

watch Matrix I with Keanu Reeves
Ho! All the possible appearances and existences of samsara and nirvana have the same source, yet two paths and two results arise as the magical display of awareness and unawareness.
HO NANG SRI KHOR DAE THAMCHE KUN ZHI CHIG LAM NYI DRAE BU NYI RIG DANG MA RIG CHOM THRUL TE

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Boomerang
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by Boomerang » Fri Dec 01, 2017 5:20 pm

weitsicht wrote:
Fri Dec 01, 2017 3:06 pm
Don't mix the yanas
What do you mean by that?
"All the suffering of the lower realms, whatever difficulty and unhappiness we may experience as human beings, as well as every other possible suffering of the three realms of existence, have their origin in cherishing ourselves more than others."

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Malcolm
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by Malcolm » Fri Dec 01, 2017 5:24 pm

Boomerang wrote:
Fri Dec 01, 2017 5:20 pm
weitsicht wrote:
Fri Dec 01, 2017 3:06 pm
Don't mix the yanas
What do you mean by that?
She means don't use lower yāna explanations to try and explicate higher yānas principles, and vice versa. It is fine to cite something from lowers yānas if it supports higher yānas, for example, citing the Uttaratantra to elucidate tathāgatagarbha in Vajrayāna texts, or Madhyamaka texts to elucidate the principle of freedom from extremes, but you would not cite Dzogchen tantras in a Madhyamaka commentary.
Buddhahood in This Life
འ༔ ཨ༔ ཧ༔ ཤ༔ ས༔ མ༔


[A]nything at all that is well spoken is the word of the Buddha.

-- Ārya-adhyāśaya-sañcodana-nāma-mahāyāna-sūtra

The different sūtras in accord with the emptiness
taught by the Sugata are definitive in meaning;
One can understand that all of those Dharmas in
which a sentient being, individual, or person are taught are provisional in meaning.

-- Samadhirāja Sūtra

Simon E.
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by Simon E. » Fri Dec 01, 2017 6:27 pm

It would be refreshing if that principle was widely observed.. :thumbsup:
If you use the word 'mind' without defining your terms I will ask you politely for a definition. :smile:
This is not to be awkward. But it's really not self-explanatory.

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KeithA
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Re: When you first started... (lightweight question)

Post by KeithA » Fri Dec 01, 2017 7:26 pm

daibunny wrote:
Fri Dec 01, 2017 1:45 pm
KeithA wrote:
Fri Dec 01, 2017 2:11 am
Not a practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism, but I have always found this advice useful:
Be patient
Be persistent
Be kind to yourself
Good luck and thanks for practicing,
Keith

_/|\_
Excellent. Beautiful post. This is what i would have said if i werent such a blabbermouth :bow:
Thanks for the kind words. We pretty much said the same thing, didn't we. This is funny to me, because the other a day, a Dharma friend said to me that "I have a saying for everything". I don't think it was meant completely as a compliment! :jumping:

_/|\_

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