Tibetan Culture and History

Forum for discussion of Tibetan Buddhism. Questions specific to one school are best posted in the appropriate sub-forum.
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Queequeg
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by Queequeg » Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:54 pm

Malcolm wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 5:59 pm
Aryjna wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 3:27 pm
There is a somewhat amusing twist in the book by Jamgon Kongtrul:
The total number of world-systems comprising one Flower-Filled World is calculated by progressively multiplying by factors of one billion: One billion great thousand third-order thousand world-systems constitutes the world-system Infinite Links. A billion of those is the world-system Infinite Continuums. A billion of those is the world-system Oceanic Infinity. One billion of those is the extent of one Flower-Filled World. Each world-system rests on its own great ocean and is encircled by a rim. At the same time, one great rim encircles them all.
One [arrangement] of such dimension constitutes the sphere of influence of a single supreme manifest dimension of awakening. To those of limited intelligence, [the sphere of influence] is taught to be only a third-order thousand world-system.
The Flower Filled World is Kusumatalagarbhālaṃkāra. This world system, the Sahaloka is contained within Kusumatalagarbhālaṃkāra, which rests in the palm of the hand of Vairocana Jñānasagara, the mahāsambhogakāya, within whose body all of the cosmos resides.
For reference, can you direct us to the source of this?

Turning to the substance of the teaching, does it make sense to ask what is outside of Vairocana's body? Or is Vairocana a sort of Mobius Strip limit?

In certain respects, these statements appear to be a series of one-up claims. Is there a point where one surrenders to infinity?
Those who, even with distracted minds,
Entered a stupa compound
And chanted but once, “Namo Buddhaya!”
Have certainly attained the path of the buddhas.

-Lotus Sutra, Expedient Means Chapter

There are beings with little dust in their eyes who are falling away because they do not hear the Dhamma. There will be those who will understand the Dhamma.
-Ayacana Sutta

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Mantrik
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by Mantrik » Tue Sep 04, 2018 11:15 pm

Malcolm wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:50 pm
Mantrik wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:31 pm
Malcolm wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 5:51 pm



The Tibetan term is stong gsum, literally "three one thousands," or trisāhasra in Sanskrit. But 3000-fold is not a good translation equivalent. I render it "a billion world universe."

It refers to 1000 * 1000 * 1000 = a billion.

There are a billion planets in the Sahaloka. Each planet has a Mt. Meru, 4 continents, sun and moon., etc.

See Trichiliocosm:
Depends which Billion we mean. When first coined, 1 Billion was 1 million x 1 million, but as a modern translation your version is OK. Is the '1 Billion' planets of the Sahaloka referring to the original or the amended 'short' Billion, or just meaning 'infinite' or 'a lot' as the term did not exist until recent centuries.
Stong gsum refers to 10 to ninth power. It is a very specific number in Indian mathematics.
Thanks. Odd that the creators of the term 'billion' didn't adopt that at first, although 1m X 1m is a logical step.
Is the number of Sahaloka deities similarly enumerated?
http://www.khyung.com

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Malcolm
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by Malcolm » Tue Sep 04, 2018 11:37 pm

Queequeg wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:54 pm
Malcolm wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 5:59 pm
Aryjna wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 3:27 pm
There is a somewhat amusing twist in the book by Jamgon Kongtrul:

The Flower Filled World is Kusumatalagarbhālaṃkāra. This world system, the Sahaloka is contained within Kusumatalagarbhālaṃkāra, which rests in the palm of the hand of Vairocana Jñānasagara, the mahāsambhogakāya, within whose body all of the cosmos resides.
For reference, can you direct us to the source of this?

Turning to the substance of the teaching, does it make sense to ask what is outside of Vairocana's body? Or is Vairocana a sort of Mobius Strip limit?

In certain respects, these statements appear to be a series of one-up claims. Is there a point where one surrenders to infinity?
This is standard Mahayana cosmology based on the Flower Ornament Sutra.
Buddhahood in This Life
འ༔ ཨ༔ ཧ༔ ཤ༔ ས༔ མ༔


[A]nything at all that is well spoken is the word of the Buddha.

-- Ārya-adhyāśaya-sañcodana-nāma-mahāyāna-sūtra

The different sūtras in accord with the emptiness
taught by the Sugata are definitive in meaning;
One can understand that all of those Dharmas in
which a sentient being, individual, or person are taught are provisional in meaning.

-- Samadhirāja Sūtra

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Losal Samten
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by Losal Samten » Tue Sep 04, 2018 11:56 pm

Malcolm wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 5:59 pm
The Flower Filled World is Kusumatalagarbhālaṃkāra. This world system, the Sahaloka is contained within Kusumatalagarbhālaṃkāra, which rests in the palm of the hand of Vairocana Jñānasagara, the mahāsambhogakāya, within whose body all of the cosmos resides.
Are there infinite Vairocana Jñānasagaras (or equivalents)?
Lacking mindfulness, we commit every wrong. - Nyoshul Khen Rinpoche
འ༔ ཨ༔ ཧ༔ ཤ༔ ས༔ མ༔
ཨོཾ་ཧ་ནུ་པྷ་ཤ་བྷ་ར་ཧེ་ཡེ་སྭཱ་ཧཱ།།
ཨཱོཾ་མ་ཏྲི་མུ་ཡེ་སལེ་འདུ།།

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Malcolm
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by Malcolm » Wed Sep 05, 2018 12:30 am

Losal Samten wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 11:56 pm
Malcolm wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 5:59 pm
The Flower Filled World is Kusumatalagarbhālaṃkāra. This world system, the Sahaloka is contained within Kusumatalagarbhālaṃkāra, which rests in the palm of the hand of Vairocana Jñānasagara, the mahāsambhogakāya, within whose body all of the cosmos resides.
Are there infinite Vairocana Jñānasagaras (or equivalents)?
Good question. When you find out, let us know.
Buddhahood in This Life
འ༔ ཨ༔ ཧ༔ ཤ༔ ས༔ མ༔


[A]nything at all that is well spoken is the word of the Buddha.

-- Ārya-adhyāśaya-sañcodana-nāma-mahāyāna-sūtra

The different sūtras in accord with the emptiness
taught by the Sugata are definitive in meaning;
One can understand that all of those Dharmas in
which a sentient being, individual, or person are taught are provisional in meaning.

-- Samadhirāja Sūtra

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Lingpupa
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by Lingpupa » Wed Sep 05, 2018 10:00 am

Queequeg wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:54 pm
For reference, can you direct us to the source of this?
It is covered, in English translation, in Jamgon Kongtrul's Treasury of Knowledge, Book 1
Or is Vairocana a sort of Mobius Strip limit?
Cute!
In certain respects, these statements appear to be a series of one-up claims. Is there a point where one surrenders to infinity?
We must remember that Tibetan literature, like Indian, is full of poetic tricks - not just metaphor and simile, but much more hyperbole and so forth than we tend to use nowadays. The Greeks had terms for these things! It doesn't pay to be too literal-minded, any more than it pays not to nevertheless take the texts seriously.
All the best
Alex Wilding
Stupa in the Snow blog at http://chagchen.org/

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Queequeg
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by Queequeg » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:08 pm

Lingpupa wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 10:00 am
Queequeg wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:54 pm
For reference, can you direct us to the source of this?
It is covered, in English translation, in Jamgon Kongtrul's Treasury of Knowledge, Book 1
Or is Vairocana a sort of Mobius Strip limit?
Cute!
In certain respects, these statements appear to be a series of one-up claims. Is there a point where one surrenders to infinity?
We must remember that Tibetan literature, like Indian, is full of poetic tricks - not just metaphor and simile, but much more hyperbole and so forth than we tend to use nowadays. The Greeks had terms for these things! It doesn't pay to be too literal-minded, any more than it pays not to nevertheless take the texts seriously.
Yes. That makes sense. But surely these fellows who were master philosophers also understood the import of their stories. Without end, without limit. Infinity... All these possibilities were available to them. Going to this degree of unfathomable but putting it in a way that leaves a question about finality or infinality itself likely was on purpose.

My question more or less boils down to "is the Buddha finite or infinite" which the Buddha refused to answer.

"I teach liberation, you fool."
Those who, even with distracted minds,
Entered a stupa compound
And chanted but once, “Namo Buddhaya!”
Have certainly attained the path of the buddhas.

-Lotus Sutra, Expedient Means Chapter

There are beings with little dust in their eyes who are falling away because they do not hear the Dhamma. There will be those who will understand the Dhamma.
-Ayacana Sutta

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Malcolm
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by Malcolm » Wed Sep 05, 2018 4:59 pm

Queequeg wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:08 pm

Yes. That makes sense.
Well, no it does not. These issues were quite consuming for Tibetans, and there is an entire literature devoted to such cosmological questions as identifying the actual Akaniṣṭha, and so on, based on Indian sources.
But surely these fellows who were master philosophers also understood the import of their stories. Without end, without limit. Infinity... All these possibilities were available to them. Going to this degree of unfathomable but putting it in a way that leaves a question about finality or infinality itself likely was on purpose.
Tsuglag Trengwa (Gtsug lag 'phreng ba 1504-1566) writes in his Feast For Paṇḍitas (mkhas pa'i dga' ston):


A billion fields of Kusumatalagarbhālaṃkara
exists in each pore
of Vairocanasagara.
Every particle of his body is similar.
Every particle of that field is as numerous.
Vairocana is the sambhogakāya
of Śākyamuni.
Where ever that kāya and buddhafield reside,
that buddhafield combines all into one,
said to be the field of every sambhogakāya.
In this manner, where ever space pervades,
also the buddhafield and kāya of the victor exists.
In the absolute definitive meaning, however,
the kāya and buddhafield
are immeasurable, and no limit can be apprehended.


The above is standard late Indian Buddhist cosmology, and has come to be the standard Mahāyāna cosmology of Tibet.

You can search how it is treated in Chinese Buddhism with this:

華藏庄嚴
Buddhahood in This Life
འ༔ ཨ༔ ཧ༔ ཤ༔ ས༔ མ༔


[A]nything at all that is well spoken is the word of the Buddha.

-- Ārya-adhyāśaya-sañcodana-nāma-mahāyāna-sūtra

The different sūtras in accord with the emptiness
taught by the Sugata are definitive in meaning;
One can understand that all of those Dharmas in
which a sentient being, individual, or person are taught are provisional in meaning.

-- Samadhirāja Sūtra

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Queequeg
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by Queequeg » Wed Sep 05, 2018 6:13 pm

Malcolm wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 4:59 pm
Queequeg wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:08 pm

Yes. That makes sense.
Well, no it does not. These issues were quite consuming for Tibetans, and there is an entire literature devoted to such cosmological questions as identifying the actual Akaniṣṭha, and so on, based on Indian sources.
But surely these fellows who were master philosophers also understood the import of their stories. Without end, without limit. Infinity... All these possibilities were available to them. Going to this degree of unfathomable but putting it in a way that leaves a question about finality or infinality itself likely was on purpose.
Tsuglag Trengwa (Gtsug lag 'phreng ba 1504-1566) writes in his Feast For Paṇḍitas (mkhas pa'i dga' ston):


A billion fields of Kusumatalagarbhālaṃkara
exists in each pore
of Vairocanasagara.
Every particle of his body is similar.
Every particle of that field is as numerous.
Vairocana is the sambhogakāya
of Śākyamuni.
Where ever that kāya and buddhafield reside,
that buddhafield combines all into one,
said to be the field of every sambhogakāya.
In this manner, where ever space pervades,
also the buddhafield and kāya of the victor exists.
In the absolute definitive meaning, however,
the kāya and buddhafield
are immeasurable, and no limit can be apprehended.


The above is standard late Indian Buddhist cosmology, and has come to be the standard Mahāyāna cosmology of Tibet.

You can search how it is treated in Chinese Buddhism with this:

華藏庄嚴
Thank you, M. Are there English translations of the Tibetan texts you refer to? Is there any particular one that would be helpful to become familiar with the Tibetan views on the subject?

So, being cute, Vairocana's body is sort of like a mobius strip.
Those who, even with distracted minds,
Entered a stupa compound
And chanted but once, “Namo Buddhaya!”
Have certainly attained the path of the buddhas.

-Lotus Sutra, Expedient Means Chapter

There are beings with little dust in their eyes who are falling away because they do not hear the Dhamma. There will be those who will understand the Dhamma.
-Ayacana Sutta

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kalden yungdrung
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by kalden yungdrung » Fri Sep 07, 2018 9:09 am

Tashi delek:

Jamgön Kongtrul Lodro Thaye Rinpoche was a great Master and known as a Rime follower.
Knew Jamgon Kongtrul Karma Lodrö Chökyi Senge 1954-1992, who blessed one time my mala and retreat room.
Very precious Lineage of Tulkus with a great History.

==================

1st
Jamgon Kongtrul Lodrö Thaye the Great (of Palpung)
son of/and recognized by the 15th Karmapa
1813-1899
co-founder of the RIME movement
|
2nd
Jamgon Kongtrul
Khyentse özer
1902-1952
spent most of his life in Tsandra Rinchen Drak near Palpung, East Tibet
|
3rd
Jamgon Kongtrul
Karma Lodrö Chökyi Senge
1954-1992
|
4th
Jamgon Kongtrul
Karma Lodrö Chökyi Nyima
26. Nov. 1995-
Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Tayé.jpg
Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Tayé.jpg (100.81 KiB) Viewed 645 times


by Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche



Among the multitude of disciples of Guru Padmasambhava during the time that he visited Tibet, ,25 were exceptional in that their realization equaled that of Padmasambhava.
One of these disciples was the Great Lopön Berotsana, a deeply realized being, a scholar and a translator.

When Berotsana passed away, he was among the first of the practitioners in Tibet to enter into the rainbow body. This accomplishment is in itself a great mark of realization.

Jamgön Kongtrül the Great, also known as Lodro Thaye, was an emanation of Lopön Berotsana. As a matter of fact, his emanations go back in the past as far as Shakyamuni Buddha. But the emanation referred to here was among the first Tibetan incarnations, and because of his vows and practice in Tibet he incarnated there from that time on. All of his incarnations were great scholars and realized beings, always actively involved in important sequences of Dharma teachings in Tibet. The birth of Jamgön Kongtrül Rinpoche was predicted in the Lankavatara Sutra where the Buddha said: A great being and liberator By the name of Lodrö Thaye,


Jamgon Kongtrul the Great A Short Biography by Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche:

Holder of the five fields of knowledge, Will come into existence. He will be a bodhisattva of ineffaceable qualities. As prophesied by the Buddha, Jamgön Kongtrül the Great was born in Upper Eastern Tibet, to the east of Lhasa, in a place called Kongpo. That is how he got his name: Kong is from Kongpo and trül from tülku, so the Tülku of Kongpo.

When Jamgön Kongtrül the Great was born, he manifested many miracles that indicated that he was the reincarnation of an enlightened being. As a young child he proved beyond doubt to be learned and realized.

At that time in Kongpo the Bön tradition, an indigenous religion of Tibet, was quite prevalent; in fact the Bön people recognized and upheld him as their supreme spiritual guide. The Bön followers offered him the name of Tenyi Yungdrung Lingpa, which means “second to none,” as Padmasambhava was called. He was as deeply realized as the Buddha; they had not previously experienced one so greatly realized.

So in the earlier part of his life he appeared as a Bön teacher, yet inwardly he manifested as a great vajrayana master. He thus imparted the profound vajrayana teachings to the Bön followers in the most skillful ways, and for the first time among the Bön followers a number of practitioners entered the rainbow body. Later on he traveled all over Tibet receiving teachings and transmissions from over one hundred of the most learned and realized masters of the four major schools of Tibetan Buddhism: Kagyu, Gelug, Sakya, and Nyingma.

He performed all these activities as a simple monk carrying his basic needs on his back and seeking alms whenever food was needed, not revealing himself as a greatly learned and awakened being. Finally, Jamgön Kongtrül Rinpoche compiled the most important teachings of the Buddha common to all the lineages of Tibetan Buddhism. These teachings are called Five Great Treasuries of Jamgön Kongtrül the Great. They include: (1) Rinchen Terzo of 60 volumes (2) Gyachen Kardzo of 5 volumes (3) Ngadzo (4) Dam Ngadzo (5) Sheja Dzo of 3 volumes Each volume has a different number of folios with a minimum of one hundred and an average of 300 to 400 folios. 34 His Eminence Jamgon Kongtrul

In these Five Great Treasuries he provided very clear and complete commentaries. He also went through the painstaking task of making sure that all these teachings maintained an unbroken line of empowerments, instructions, and other forms required in a continuous line of transmission. Because of the great responsibility he assumed toward the preservation and spread of the great teachings, he was recognized by all the schools of Buddhism in Tibet as one of the greatest Rime (non-sectarian) masters.

Among all his renowned teachers, his personal root guru was Situ Pema Nyinje Wangpo, the IXth Situpa. Because of this, Jamgön Kongtrül the Great belongs to the golden chain of Kagyu Lineage masters. Not only did he preserve the essence of Buddhadharma through the Five Great Treasuries, but during his lifetime he personally helped to sustain the unbroken lineages by giving empowerments and oral transmissions to numerous practitioners of the Dharma. When the Chinese Communists invaded Tibet in 1959, the existence of Buddhism was essentially destroyed. Yet, mainly due to the work of Jamgön Kongtrül the Great, the unbroken line of Dharma teachings has been preserved. Without him the teachings might have degenerated, even if Communism had not taken over Tibet. In short, the presence and activity of Jamgön Kongtrül the Great was most timely.

It was in accordance with the predictions of the Buddha that when there would be a degeneration of the Dharma, a great bodhisattva would uphold it by preserving the teachings in writing and by transmitting the Dharma through an unbroken lineage. Jamgön Kongtrül Lodro Thaye lived well into his eighties, and before passing away he prophesied that he would have five incarnations, those of Body, Speech, Mind, Qualities, and Activities. He also prophesied that his mind incarnation would make his main seat the great retreat caves at Tsen near Palpung, the seat of the Situpas.
In accordance with these predictions, the second Jamgön Kongtrül, Khyentse Öser, was born as a prince son of the XV Karmapa, Khakhyab Dorje, and established his seat at Tsen. During his lifetime he maintained an immensely important role in the preservation of the Kagyu Lineage and became teacher to His Holiness the XVI Gyalwa Karmapa. Thus again, he belonged to the golden chain of the Kagyu Lineage. At the end of his life, Khyentse Öser alerted his close disciples Densal Book 35 that soon he would be passing away.

When his disciples made an earnest request that he live longer, he told them that it was time for him to go but that they should not mourn or worry because his emanation would be born soon. He prophesied that the birth would be in a family related to his mother and in fact, the house where he would be born could be seen from the house of his present mother. When his disciples requested more information, he convinced them that there was no need, as the all-knowing wisdom mind of the Karmapa would see whatever other information was necessary. He also said that the third Jamgön Kongtrül would, in fact, play a more important and expansive role in the spread and preservation of the Buddhadharma. So in 1954, precisely in accordance with the predictions of the second Jamgön Kongtrül, the third Jamgön Kongtrül was born into a noble family from a dakini mother with noble qualities.

From the time he was a little child, he was brought up under the special care of His Holiness the XVI Gyalwa Karmapa. He received full transmission and education from both His Holiness and other eminent masters of the Kagyu Lineage. Presently, in this year of 1984, His Eminence Jamgön Kongtrül Rinpoche is one of the four regents of His Holiness Karmapa. He is fully matured and manifests the wisdom, compassion and presence of the Kongtrül Lineage as well as that of His Holiness Karmapa. He pays close attention to the many important wishes of his Holiness the XVI Karmapa and diligently fulfills them with tremendous confidence and enthusiasm. For those who had the good fortune to experience his presence and teachings during his short visit to the United States this year, it was abundantly clear that His Eminence is an awakened heartfelt son of His Holiness Karmapa and that he is completely trustworthy. y His Eminence live long in our midst and continue to guide and inspire us so that we may effect wholesome changes in the world.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamgon_Kongtrul
http://www.jamgonkongtrul.org/section.php?s1=1&s2=2
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kalden yungdrung
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by kalden yungdrung » Wed Sep 12, 2018 9:56 am

Tashi delek,

A brief biography of: H.H. Dilgo Kyentse Yangsi Rinpoche.



http://buddhism.lib.ntu.edu.tw/FULLTEXT ... 117508.htm

https://shechen.org/spiritual-developme ... -rinpoche/
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kalden yungdrung
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by kalden yungdrung » Sun Sep 23, 2018 2:47 pm

Tashi delek,



རེབ་གོང་སྔགས་མ།
Yoginis from Rebgong, Amdo.

Yes we have also women in the Buddha Dharma. We do not hear much about them.

Rebkong in Tibet, where there are many Ngakpas living, a very famous area in Tibet.

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kalden yungdrung
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by kalden yungdrung » Wed Sep 26, 2018 9:33 am

Tashi delek,

May all the sentient being be blessed by seeing the precious secret Dance of Guru Senge Dradog.

OM A HUNG BENZA GURU PEMA SIDHI HUNG
OM A HUNG VAJRA GURU PEMA SIDDHI HUNG


One the Palyul Tsechu Garcham in Taiwan on 16/September/2018
Video by Yönten Lama and edited by Kardak.


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kalden yungdrung
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by kalden yungdrung » Wed Sep 26, 2018 10:42 am

Tashi delek,

Chöd, important practice as well in Yungdrung Bön as well Dorje Thekpa.

==================

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kalden yungdrung
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by kalden yungdrung » Wed Sep 26, 2018 12:57 pm

Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche
was born in Bhutan in 1961 and was recognised as the main incarnation of Dzongsar Khyentse (1894-1959).


From early childhood, he has studied with some of the greatest contemporary masters, particularly H.H. Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche.

From a young age he has been active in preserving the Buddhist teachings, establishing centres of learning and practice, supporting practitioners, publishing books, and teaching all over the world.

Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche supervises his traditional seat of Dzongsar Monastery and its retreat centres in Eastern Tibet, as well as his new colleges in India and Bhutan.

He has also has established centres in Australia, North America, and the Far East. These are gathered under Siddhartha's Intent.


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kalden yungdrung
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by kalden yungdrung » Wed Sep 26, 2018 1:03 pm

Tashi delek ,

Mandala offering, one of the preliminaries / Ngöndro in the 6 Tibetan Traditions.

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lelopa
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by lelopa » Thu Sep 27, 2018 5:52 am

.....................
Last edited by lelopa on Thu Sep 27, 2018 5:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
ཨོཾ་ཨཱཿཧཱུྃ་བོ་དྷི་ཙིཏྟ་མ་ཧཱ་སུ་ཁ་ཛྙཱ་ན་དྷཱརྟུ་ཨཱཿ

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lelopa
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Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by lelopa » Thu Sep 27, 2018 5:55 am

lelopa wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 5:52 am
kalden yungdrung wrote:
Fri Sep 07, 2018 9:09 am
Tashi delek:

Jamgön Kongtrul Lodro Thaye Rinpoche was a great Master and known as a Rime follower.
Knew Jamgon Kongtrul Karma Lodrö Chökyi Senge 1954-1992, who blessed one time my mala and retreat room.
Very precious Lineage of Tulkus with a great History.

==================

1st
Jamgon Kongtrul Lodrö Thaye the Great (of Palpung)
son of/and recognized by the 15th Karmapa
1813-1899
co-founder of the RIME movement
|
2nd
Jamgon Kongtrul
Khyentse özer
1902-1952
spent most of his life in Tsandra Rinchen Drak near Palpung, East Tibet
|
3rd
Jamgon Kongtrul
Karma Lodrö Chökyi Senge
1954-1992
|
4th
Jamgon Kongtrul
Karma Lodrö Chökyi Nyima
26. Nov. 1995-

Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Tayé.jpg



by Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche


.............................
...............................................
.................................................

who says this picture shows Jamgon Kongtrul?
google Thonmi Sambhota depictions please :smile:
ཨོཾ་ཨཱཿཧཱུྃ་བོ་དྷི་ཙིཏྟ་མ་ཧཱ་སུ་ཁ་ཛྙཱ་ན་དྷཱརྟུ་ཨཱཿ

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lelopa
Posts: 403
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2012 5:03 pm

Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by lelopa » Thu Sep 27, 2018 5:55 am

double posting :emb:
ཨོཾ་ཨཱཿཧཱུྃ་བོ་དྷི་ཙིཏྟ་མ་ཧཱ་སུ་ཁ་ཛྙཱ་ན་དྷཱརྟུ་ཨཱཿ

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kalden yungdrung
Posts: 3869
Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2010 10:40 pm

Re: Tibetan Culture and History

Post by kalden yungdrung » Thu Sep 27, 2018 6:04 pm

Tashi delek,

Chöd an important practice in the 6 Tibetan Traditions.




See also below for some explanations about this Chöd practice:
https://books.google.nl/books?id=C9ImDQ ... on&f=false
The best meditation is no meditation

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