Is tibetan inherently peacefull ?

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AlexanderS
Posts: 394
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2011 8:58 am

Re: Is tibetan inherently peacefull ?

Post by AlexanderS » Fri Oct 05, 2018 9:20 pm

kalden yungdrung wrote:
Fri Oct 05, 2018 9:12 pm
AlexanderS wrote:
Fri Oct 05, 2018 8:56 pm
kalden yungdrung wrote:
Wed Oct 03, 2018 9:30 pm
My sources for padmashambava killing in his youth is "The Lotus Born", his biography, written by Yeshe Tsogyal and translated by Erik Pema Kunsang. Another account where he kills 500 brahmins through a destructive ceremony is "Crazy Wisdom" by Trungpa.

My point with Milarepa was that Marpa asks him at some point to kill bandits with his magic, which also makes Marpa guilty of killing.
Tashi delek A,

Thanks for your reply.

Like told before, this Guru Rinpoche story is brand new for me.

- What do you think, has this story consequences for the status of Guru Rinpoche ?

We all know him as a realized Tantrika with great Compassion and Wisdom, therefore i cannot imagine myself that Guru Rinpoche would miss use Tantric powers / Siddhis.


KY.
It is not for me to say. It does not disminish my view of Guru Rinpoche. It may for others. I suppose it was revealed as a treasure and published as a book so people may read it.

M.G.
Posts: 427
Joined: Sun Jun 23, 2013 12:56 am

Re: Is tibetan inherently peacefull ?

Post by M.G. » Sat Oct 06, 2018 4:16 am

WeiHan wrote:
Fri Oct 05, 2018 12:43 pm
M.G. wrote:
Fri Oct 05, 2018 12:21 pm
WeiHan wrote:
Fri Oct 05, 2018 6:34 am
Basically, you are saying that violence in Buddhism is allowed as long as it has a good justification.

But then, which religions resort to violence without good justifications? In fact, who in the world resort to violence without good justifications? Does anyone need Buddhism to teach them non-violence, then?
That’s a good question.

Tibetan Buddhism has an entirely consequentialist ethic, to the point where it can come across as shocking, almost inhuman - many here are familiar with stories of Vajrayana masters who kill sentient beings, then ensure their rebirth in Pure Lands, guaranteeing their ultimate liberation.

That said, you’re correct to say that many religions, in practice, teach roughly similar ethics - “thou shalt not kill, unless God authorizes it. Then it’s OK, even meritorious, and the whole world will be better for it.”

So I’d agree one shouldn’t look to Buddhism if one is purely interested in peaceful morality. (And plenty of peaceful people aren’t Buddhist.)

You should really only turn to Buddhism if you think it’s the best path to enlightened wisdom. I’m not sure there’s anything else there you couldn’t find elsewhere.
However, that is really a way to mass propagate Buddhism in a easily understandable form. Directly preaching, rebirth, karma and other higher teachings is never going to gain followers in a fast clip. And these, we really have to solid proofs on them and have to admit that they are beliefs which one is free to choose whether to take or reject. Furthermore, these higher teachings never have visible influence on the society in a bigger scale. Peace will be different, at least people believe that once somebody proclaim that he has a solution to peace, it is likely he will attract some audience.
I’m not sure of that ; if the key to propagating a religion was emphasizing its peacefulness, Jainism would probably be the dominant global faith.

I’d personally say Buddhism’s popular appeal largely comes from its understanding of mind, and its promise of freedom through meditative practice.

WeiHan
Posts: 536
Joined: Sun Oct 30, 2011 5:50 pm

Re: Is tibetan inherently peacefull ?

Post by WeiHan » Sat Oct 06, 2018 7:35 am

M.G. wrote:
Sat Oct 06, 2018 4:16 am


I’m not sure of that ; if the key to propagating a religion was emphasizing its peacefulness, Jainism would probably be the dominant global faith.

I’d personally say Buddhism’s popular appeal largely comes from its understanding of mind, and its promise of freedom through meditative practice.
I do not deny that too. I myself am only interested with the mind (spiritual) and philosophical aspects. But if you observe around, not only Buddhism but in all religions, the biggest segments are the one associated politically, or at least more associated with and has impact with people lives...I myself am not keen with all these aspects ..

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