Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

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mddrill
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Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

Post by mddrill » Thu Feb 21, 2019 5:47 am

Does Tibetan Buddhism have techniques for increasing loving-kindness the way Theravada does? I can be a very angry, resentful, and selfish person and would like to increase my loving-kindness.

Pema Rigdzin
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Re: Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

Post by Pema Rigdzin » Thu Feb 21, 2019 6:33 am

Tonglen is an excellent practice for this. The contemplations of lojong are also great. And into the tantric realm, there's the practice of chod. And of course, meditation on Avalokiteshvara (or Chenrezig in Tibetan). Really there are so many practices one could do, coming from different angles. Probably the best place to start would be tonglen, though, in my opinion.

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明安 Myoan
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Re: Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

Post by 明安 Myoan » Thu Feb 21, 2019 7:40 am

Bodhicitta.
With a heart wandering in ignorance down this path and that, to guide me I simply say Namu-Amida-Butsu. -- Ippen

The Fundamental Vow [of Amitabha Buddha] is just for such people as woodcutters and grassgatherers, vegetable pickers, drawers of water and the like, illiterate folk who merely recite the Buddha's name wholeheartedly, confident that as a result of saying "Namu Amida Butsu" they will be born into the western land. -- Master Hōnen

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Vasana
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Re: Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

Post by Vasana » Thu Feb 21, 2019 8:09 am

The 4 immeasurables and 7 part meditation for developing bodhichitta.

You can also practice Theravada style metta, starting on yourself and then expand to people you love, are neutral towards and those you have problems with etc. Then you can extend it further to the aspiration of Bodhichitta for all beings.
'When alone, watch your mind. When with others, watch your speech'- Old Kadampa saying.

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Vasana
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Re: Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

Post by Vasana » Thu Feb 21, 2019 8:25 am

See these threads: Dharma Gems

viewtopic.php?t=1325&start=80
Losal Samten wrote:
Thu Dec 08, 2016 5:03 pm
Jetsun Taranatha's Essence of Ambrosia, Contemplation on the Causal Links that Lead to the Attainment of Buddhahood
  • I need to attain buddhahood. I therefore need to cultivate bodhicitta since it is the cause of buddhahood. The cause of bodhicitta is compassion. The cause of compassion is love. The cause of love is appreciation and gratefulness. The cause of appreciation is recognising all sentient beings have been my parents. I should meditate on developing these qualities in stages.

    -Meditate again and again.-

    All sentient beings are my parents--they have been so kind to me. Wouldn't it be right if they were to be free from suffering? Wouldn't it be right for them to be comfortable and happy? I will, therefore, attain buddhahood in order to establish them all in happiness. Once I have attained buddhahood, I will also place all sentient beings on the level of buddhahood.

    [... in the annals of the graduated teachings called The Necessary Stages of Mind Training in the Mahayana, this quote appears: "You should train your mind by stages in the seven causal links found in Atisha's extraordinary Mahayana teachings".

    Atisha's presentation of the seven causal links states that buddhahood is not without causes and conditions. Buddhahood arises from the cause of bodhicitta. Bodhicitta is born from a pure and excellent motivation. A pure motivation arises from great compassion. Great compassion arises from love. Love arises from seeing all sentient beings with affection. Seeing beings with affection arises from appreciation and gratefulness. Appreciation and gratefulness arise from developing the perception of sentient beings as your mothers.]
And,:

viewtopic.php?f=39&t=14926
Nicholas Weeks wrote:
Sun Dec 15, 2013 4:15 am
Here is a reminder from the Upasaka Precepts Sutra (Rulu's translation) concerning the pitiable state of beings and thus their need for bodhisattva guidance.
Invoking Compassion

“World-Honored One, how does one invoke compassion?”
“Good man, a wise man sees deeply that sentient beings are sinking in the ocean of suffering, the immense ocean of repeated birth and death. He invokes compassion because he wishes to rescue them; or because he sees that sentient beings lack [the Eighteen Exclusive Dharmas]—the Ten Powers, the Four Fearlessnesses, the Great Compassion, and the Threefold Mindfulness of Equality—and he wishes to enable them to have these abilities.
“[He invokes compassion] because he regards as his kin sentient beings bearing grudges and malice; because he sees that sentient beings have lost the right path and guidance; because he sees that sentient beings, trapped in the mud of the five desires, abandon self-restraint; because he sees that sentient beings are unable to break the bondage of their spouses and assets; because he sees that sentient beings are proud of their bodies and lives; or because he regards sentient beings as his kin, though they are bewitched by evil friends, such as the six non-Buddhist masters.
“[He invokes compassion] because he sees that sentient beings are attached to their rebirths in the Three Realms of Existence, undergoing suffering; because he sees that sentient beings are attached to the painful requitals for their evil karmas done with body, voice, and mind; or because he sees that sentient beings thirst for the five desires, like drinking salt water to quench thirst.
“[He invokes compassion] because he sees that sentient beings seek happiness but do not produce the causes of happiness, that they fear suffering but delight in producing the causes of suffering, and that they seek to be reborn as gods, to enjoy celestial pleasures, but do not observe the precepts; because he sees that sentient beings believe that they have a self and its belongings, though these are nonexistent; because he sees that sentient beings, without a definite nature, transmigrate through the five life-paths; because he sees that sentient beings fear birth, old age, and death, but do karmas that make them repeat birth, old age, and death; or because he sees that sentient beings suffer in body and mind but do more karmas [that cause suffering].
“[He invokes compassion] because he sees that sentient beings suffer the pain of love and parting but do not cease loving; because he sees that sentient beings remain in the dark of ignorance, not knowing the glowing radiance of the wisdom lamp; because he sees that sentient beings burn in the fire of afflictions but do not seek the water of samādhi; because he sees that sentient beings do immeasurable evils for the pleasures of the five desires; because he sees that sentient beings know the pains of the five desires but endlessly seek them, like the hungry feeding on poisoned food; or because he sees that sentient beings suffer under a cruel ruler in an evil world but still abandon self-restraint.
“[He invokes compassion] because he sees that sentient beings in the eight kinds of suffering do not know how to end the causes of their suffering; because he sees that sentient beings cannot help undergoing hunger, thirst, cold, and heat; because he sees that sentient beings violate the precepts and will be reborn as hell-dwellers, hungry ghosts, or animals; because he sees that sentient beings have no command of their body, strength, lifespan, peace of mind, or eloquence; because he sees sentient beings with incomplete faculties; because he sees that sentient beings are born in fringe countries [where the Dharma is unavailable] and fail to do good dharmas; because he sees that, in times of famine, emaciated sentient beings rob one another; or because he sees that, in times of war, sentient beings, out of malice, harm one another and will receive immeasurable painful requitals.
“[He invokes compassion] because he sees that sentient beings, having encountered a Buddha in the world, are unable to accept and uphold the pure Dharma, which is like sweet dew; because he sees that sentient beings choose to believe in evil friends and refuse to follow the teachings of beneficent learned friends; because he sees that wealthy sentient beings refuse to give alms; because he sees that sentient beings suffer in making a living by farming or merchandising; or because he sees that sentient beings, including parents, siblings, spouses, servants, and relatives, do not love one another.
“All sentient beings undergo such suffering. Good man, a wise man invokes compassion because he sees that even the bliss of samādhi in Neither with Nor without Perception Heaven is like the pain in hell.
'When alone, watch your mind. When with others, watch your speech'- Old Kadampa saying.

haha
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Re: Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

Post by haha » Thu Feb 21, 2019 11:41 am

mddrill wrote:
Thu Feb 21, 2019 5:47 am
Does Tibetan Buddhism have techniques for increasing loving-kindness the way Theravada does? I can be a very angry, resentful, and selfish person and would like to increase my loving-kindness.
Please check out the seventh chapter of Gampopa, “The Jewel Ornament of Liberation”.
Personally, it was beneficial to me; and I believe it would do same to you. It is from Mahayana prospective.

stevie
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Re: Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

Post by stevie » Thu Feb 21, 2019 2:21 pm

mddrill wrote:
Thu Feb 21, 2019 5:47 am
Does Tibetan Buddhism have techniques for increasing loving-kindness the way Theravada does? I can be a very angry, resentful, and selfish person and would like to increase my loving-kindness.
Maybe not exactly the way Theravada does but very similar.
Just to give an example (which may not be respresentative for all presentations within Tibetan Buddhism):
Love may be presented in the context of attaining calm abiding through concentrating on objects of meditation and there are different kinds of objects and love is among those that are 'Objects of meditation for purifying your behavior'.
If one is suffering from coarse afflictions then it may be difficult to generate love towards beings or particular beings ad hoc which actually is no problem since the context for generation of love is presented as being concentrative meditation and starting with meditating on objects like e.g. the breath or the visualized Buddha or certain aspects of the teachings naturally attenuates coarse afflictions.

Donny
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Re: Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

Post by Donny » Thu Feb 21, 2019 2:42 pm

There is a very beautiful book by Tulku Thondup "The Heart of Unconditional Love: A Powerful New Approach to Loving-Kindness Meditation". It is in essence a mix of Metta-Meditation with the visualization and mantra recitation of Chenrezig.

Tata1
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Re: Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

Post by Tata1 » Thu Feb 21, 2019 5:31 pm

mddrill wrote:
Thu Feb 21, 2019 5:47 am
Does Tibetan Buddhism have techniques for increasing loving-kindness the way Theravada does? I can be a very angry, resentful, and selfish person and would like to increase my loving-kindness.

Yes. Tibetan buddhisn sutra teaching include the four immeasurables

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javier.espinoza.t
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Re: Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

Post by javier.espinoza.t » Fri Feb 22, 2019 3:03 pm

mddrill wrote:
Thu Feb 21, 2019 5:47 am
Does Tibetan Buddhism have techniques for increasing loving-kindness the way Theravada does? I can be a very angry, resentful, and selfish person and would like to increase my loving-kindness.
In general loving kindness -and alike- is engaged as mind training in my experience in the Mahayana way and sense.

If is there metta in the theravada sense it is less likely to be Theravada because originaly the Sarvatisvada tradition was introduced in Tibet, not that one of the Thera's. Sarvatisvada is a school similar to Theravada.

You can find loving kindness in the refuges and prayers, and also in dedication of merits, as a remainder.

If you want to know a bit of such "training", read a chapter of the Lotus Sutra and try to imagine everything.

SilenceMonkey
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Re: Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

Post by SilenceMonkey » Wed Feb 27, 2019 3:49 pm

I find chanting mantras increases my sense of love. Especially Chenrezig, Manjushri, Green Tara, White Tara and Amitabha. I imagine sadhanas and prayers related with loving deities would also do the same. Especially if you have faith, have some body awareness or have done some kind of energy practices in the past.

Mingyur Rinpoche's Joy of Living program is also a simple and profound way to practice love. He says love and compassion is the nature of awareness itself! So it's always with you.

SilenceMonkey
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Re: Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

Post by SilenceMonkey » Wed Feb 27, 2019 4:33 pm

And spinning prayer wheels!

PeterC
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Re: Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

Post by PeterC » Thu Feb 28, 2019 4:22 am

mddrill wrote:
Thu Feb 21, 2019 5:47 am
Does Tibetan Buddhism have techniques for increasing loving-kindness the way Theravada does? I can be a very angry, resentful, and selfish person and would like to increase my loving-kindness.
Strongly recommend reading Dilgo Khyentse R.'s commentary on the 37 practices of a Bodhisattva, with particular reference to the distinction between ultimate and relative bodhicitta.

In general the practice of the Brahmavihara, of which metta is one, appears in many places and many forms in Tibetan buddhism

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kalden yungdrung
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Re: Does Tibetan Buddhism have Metta practice?

Post by kalden yungdrung » Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:01 pm

mddrill wrote:
Thu Feb 21, 2019 5:47 am
Does Tibetan Buddhism have techniques for increasing loving-kindness the way Theravada does? I can be a very angry, resentful, and selfish person and would like to increase my loving-kindness.
Tashi delek,

Guess in Buddhism the understanding of the Noble Truths forms the very base for the generation of Compassion, as well the oath to serve for the well being of sentient beings, due to good karma etc.

In Theravada they have Compassion, no doubt about it, but the attainment of Buddhahood or the way is different than in the all encompassing Compassion factor.

The Heart Sutra and other Wisdoms Sutras will increase Compassion.

But a good start is with there is no self, good understood in the ultimate sense (of Bodhicitta) opens Compassion.
The experience of this no self, results imo in Compassion experience.

Compassion is not an outside factor, it is inherent connected to humans etc.
To feel happy can be a result of experiencing Compassion.

Agree Compassion and Wisdom are the 2 legs of the Buddha.
The best meditation is no meditation

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