Is there a gradual introduction to Buddhism like the Lamrim of the Gelugpas in other buddhist schools?

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nomono
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Is there a gradual introduction to Buddhism like the Lamrim of the Gelugpas in other buddhist schools?

Post by nomono » Sat Mar 14, 2020 4:55 pm

Im looking for books that gradually and chronoligically introduces the reader with Buddhism from the view of Kagyu, Jonang, Tiantai/Tendai or Zen that begins from the Life of the Buddha, the four noble truths up to Karma, Rebirth, Nature of Mind and Buddha Nature. I only find books that are written in the view of the Gelugpas or are heavily influenced by the lamrim.

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Könchok Thrinley
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Re: Is there a gradual introduction to Buddhism like the Lamrim of the Gelugpas in other buddhist schools?

Post by Könchok Thrinley » Sat Mar 14, 2020 5:21 pm

nomono wrote:
Sat Mar 14, 2020 4:55 pm
Im looking for books that gradually and chronoligically introduces the reader with Buddhism from the view of Kagyu, Jonang, Tiantai/Tendai or Zen that begins from the Life of the Buddha, the four noble truths up to Karma, Rebirth, Nature of Mind and Buddha Nature. I only find books that are written in the view of the Gelugpas or are heavily influenced by the lamrim.
Well, that is kinda hard. Lamrim literature of the Kadampa lineage (from which Gelug school originated) was very influential. I can suggest you reading Gampopa's Jewel Ornament of Liberation, however that is also a Lamrim literature (AFAIK, please correct me if I am wrong). Lamrim means graduated path, so hard to find something that is not lamrim but goes gradually through the path.

Good reading and overview is Namkhai Norbu Rinpoche's The Crystal and the Way of Light.
“Observing samaya involves to remain inseparable from the union of wisdom and compassion at all times, to sustain mindfulness, and to put into practice the guru’s instructions”. Garchen Rinpoche

Formerly known as Miroku.

avatamsaka3
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Re: Is there a gradual introduction to Buddhism like the Lamrim of the Gelugpas in other buddhist schools?

Post by avatamsaka3 » Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:19 pm

Jonang:

Essence of Ambrosia: A Guide to Buddhist Contemplations by Tarantha

Sakya:

The Three Levels of Spiritual Perception: A Commentary on the Three Visions, Deshung Rinpoche
Three Visions: Fundamental Teachings of the Sakya Lineage of Tibetan Buddhism, Ngorchen Konchog Lhundrub

Zen:

There are many different Zens: Chan, Soto, Rinzai, Korean, Vietnamese. I understand Soto best. Dogen is neither gradual nor sudden in his approach to enlightenment. In Soto, there is no "gradual path", because practice and attainment are one. I'm not sure how this plays out in the other varieties. Some useful texts:

Attaining the Way: A Guide to the Practice of Chan Buddhism by Sheng Yen [Chan]
Shobogenzo by Dogen, translated by Nishijima and Cross [Soto Zen]

Tientai:

I'm not as familiar with this school, but I imagine the works of Zhiyi are the most authoritative (not sure if there's a gradual aspect):

Clear Serenity, Quiet Insight, translated Paul Swanson
Last edited by avatamsaka3 on Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Nicholas Weeks
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Re: Is there a gradual introduction to Buddhism like the Lamrim of the Gelugpas in other buddhist schools?

Post by Nicholas Weeks » Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:22 pm

An Introduction to Buddhism by Peter Harvey - 2013 edition is comprehensive & non-sectarian.

Here you can dip into it, to sample:

https://archive.org/details/anintroduct ... y/mode/2up
May all seek, find or follow the Path of Buddhas.

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WesleyP
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Re: Is there a gradual introduction to Buddhism like the Lamrim of the Gelugpas in other buddhist schools?

Post by WesleyP » Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:27 pm

I recommend the classical 'What the Buddha Taught' by Sri Walphola Rahula.

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