Commitment Issues

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PadmaVonSamba
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Re: Commitment Issues

Post by PadmaVonSamba » Tue Jul 12, 2011 8:30 pm

I guess what I was trying to nail down before was what you think dharma has to offer you, and what are you willing to do to get it. The two are connected.

Suppose you lived someplace that has a back yard, and you were informed that buried somewhere in that yard is a key to a safe-deposit box at a bank, holding ten million dollars, and if you find the key the money will be yours.

First, you have to really believe that what you were told is true.
Second, you have to decide how much you want that ten million dollars.

If you are really not sure, you may never even start digging, but if you are sure,
then you will spend every day and night trying to find that key.

I am not laying this on you personally, but your situation, as I said, is very common.
Theoretically, hypothetically, we accept the teachings of the Buddha. Sure, it's possible that there might be the key to a treasure buried in that yard. But this is very different from really, really believing it to the point that there are no more obstacles.

So, this is why I brought up (for everybody, not just you) the importance of really examining one's confidence as well as one's expectations. So, I think that really thinking about that will help.

(And, I am not trying to second-guess you. Obviously all I know is what you posted in a couple of paragraphs, so I hope you don't think I am trying to lay a guilt trip down or anything like that! But I have found, and have often been reminded by my teachers, to examine my motivation and to consider the rarity of the dharma and to think about what a treasure it is).

So, what do you think you will do now?
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Arnoud
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Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Arnoud » Tue Jul 12, 2011 9:04 pm

heart wrote: Hi C,

I really don't know because I met my teacher directly and received my first teachings and refuge from him as my first steps as a Buddhist, and he did amaze me. Then for many years I didn't have the opportunity to meet him and I tried to relate to some other teachers. That didn't really work out. Then I met him again and he made an even deeper impact. I started to realize that of all the teachers I met only he seemed to put his finger straight in to my heart. So the process wasn't fast at all. Took many years. Since I was very interested in Dzogchen I also had many intellectual issues about what teaching I wanted to practice and what my Guru seemed to give to his disciples. That was all I waste of time. Now I spent the last 17 years seeing him at least once a year and received many teachings from him. My wishes for Dzogchen teachings have also been fulfilled like a wish fulfilling jewel.

Tomorrow morning I leave to see him and I still have some butterflies in my stomach thinking of meeting him.

Lots of love
/magnus
Hi Magnus,

Thank you very much for your reply. I appreciate your personal story. Makes it more real and tangible.

I hope you have a great retreat. Where is it?

Best,

- C

Arnoud
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Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Arnoud » Tue Jul 12, 2011 9:10 pm

PadmaVonSamba wrote:I guess what I was trying to nail down before was what you think dharma has to offer you, and what are you willing to do to get it. The two are connected.
Suppose you lived someplace that has a back yard, and you were informed that buried somewhere in that yard is a key to a safe-deposit box at a bank, holding ten million dollars, and if you find the key the money will be yours.

First, you have to really believe that what you were told is true.
Second, you have to decide how much you want that ten million dollars.

If you are really not sure, you may never even start digging, but if you are sure,
then you will spend every day and night trying to find that key.
Hi Padma,
Many thanks for your answer. I appreciate you taking the time to answer my many questions.
I am not laying this on you personally, but your situation, as I said, is very common.
Theoretically, hypothetically, we accept the teachings of the Buddha. Sure, it's possible that there might be the key to a treasure buried in that yard. But this is very different from really, really believing it to the point that there are no more obstacles.

So, this is why I brought up (for everybody, not just you) the importance of really examining one's confidence as well as one's expectations. So, I think that really thinking about that will help.

(And, I am not trying to second-guess you. Obviously all I know is what you posted in a couple of paragraphs, so I hope you don't think I am trying to lay a guilt trip down or anything like that! But I have found, and have often been reminded by my teachers, to examine my motivation and to consider the rarity of the dharma and to think about what a treasure it is).
Please don't worry. I don't think you are trying to guilt trip me at all. To be honest, that doesn't happen very often. Besides my lack of focus I am a pretty steady guy. Don't get upset very easily.
So, what do you think you will do now?
I don't know yet. Keep looking and visiting some teachers and, in the mean time, keep practicing what I already know. That will only help.

Best,

C

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heart
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Re: Commitment Issues

Post by heart » Wed Jul 13, 2011 3:38 am

Clarence wrote:
heart wrote: Hi C,

I really don't know because I met my teacher directly and received my first teachings and refuge from him as my first steps as a Buddhist, and he did amaze me. Then for many years I didn't have the opportunity to meet him and I tried to relate to some other teachers. That didn't really work out. Then I met him again and he made an even deeper impact. I started to realize that of all the teachers I met only he seemed to put his finger straight in to my heart. So the process wasn't fast at all. Took many years. Since I was very interested in Dzogchen I also had many intellectual issues about what teaching I wanted to practice and what my Guru seemed to give to his disciples. That was all I waste of time. Now I spent the last 17 years seeing him at least once a year and received many teachings from him. My wishes for Dzogchen teachings have also been fulfilled like a wish fulfilling jewel.

Tomorrow morning I leave to see him and I still have some butterflies in my stomach thinking of meeting him.

Lots of love
/magnus
Hi Magnus,

Thank you very much for your reply. I appreciate your personal story. Makes it more real and tangible.

I hope you have a great retreat. Where is it?

Best,

- C
In Austria, Rangjung Yeshe Gomde. Normally I go to Denmark but not this year.

/magnus
"We are all here to help each other go through this thing, whatever it is."
~Kurt Vonnegut

"The principal practice is Guruyoga. But we need to understand that any secondary practice combined with Guruyoga becomes a principal practice." ChNNR (Teachings on Thun and Ganapuja)

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gnegirl
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Re: Commitment Issues

Post by gnegirl » Fri Jul 15, 2011 1:56 pm

Clarence wrote:
gnegirl wrote:I know i may start to sound like a broken record, but if you feel you haven't met your heart teacher, make a strong aspiration to meet him/her for the sake of all sentient beings. Also do things to increase merit... that helps too...

Aspiration prayers work, think that big rock coming down on Harrison Ford in the first scene of Raiders of the Lost Ark effective.

Sorta scary sometimes! ha!

Don't lose faith, they are out there somewhere.... sometimes you just gotta help karma along so to speak.
Any good ones out there? Thanks again.
Nothing formal that i know of. I made my own up at the time, very spontaneous and from the heart. However, i will see if i can work on cleaning up what i remember of it...

IMO, this sort of thing would be best coming straight from you, but a second-best might be some sort of already written prayer to get a start from.
"Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise." --Surangama Sutra

Phenomenon, vast as space, dharmata is your base, arising and falling like ocean tide cycles, why do i cling to your illusion of unceasing changlessness?

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Malcolm
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Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Malcolm » Fri Jul 15, 2011 2:09 pm

Clarence wrote:
pemachophel wrote:Clarence,

If you want to stick with Longchen Nyingthig, consider Loppon Rechung at Mipham Shedra in Boulder, CO or Anyen Rinpoche in Denver, CO. Both are resident in the U.S. and work with Their students on an on-going day-to-day basis. If you don't mind switching to Dudjom Tersar, consider Lama Pema Dorje in Oakland, CA or His brother, Lama Dawa, in Lansing, Iowa (see http://www.saraswatibhawan.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;). Both also are resident in the U.S. If Bhutanese Drukpa is not a deal-breaker, consider Lama Karma at Mila Druk in Longmont, CO; again resident in the U.S. Then there's Loppon Jigme, Chatral Rinpoche's disciple in Marin county, CA (I don't remember the exact town), or there's Tulku Jigme Tromge at the Padmasambhava Peace Institute in Cazadero, CA. Bhaka Tulku is not personally teaching anymore (or so I've heard), but He has a couple of Tibetan disciples teaching in the SoCal area. Another good Nyingma Lama (Longchen Nyingthig & Dudjom Tersar) is Khenpo Sonam in Santa Monica, CA. If being a gringo is no problemo, there's Tulku Sherab Dorje in upstate NY (the Catskills) and Lama Rangbar who's soon moving to nearby Poughkipsie (spelling?). Of course, Tulku Sang-ngak is excellent. He lives in Santa Fe, NM. However, he's out of the country approximately half of each year (or at least he has been the last couple-few years).

Just a few Lamas who come to mind Who live in the U.S. and are very accessible to Their students on an on-going basis.

Good luck and best wishes.
HI Pema Chophel,

Many thanks for that. It is nice to see such a big list of Nyingma teachers. Unfortunately, at the moment, I am living in Europe. So, although some of your suggestions sound great, I don't think they are feasible at this moment. Of course, I could travel regularly to the U.S., but I would hope to find someone closer to Belgium/Netherlands.
Many thanks again. Sorry I can't follow up on your suggestions.

- C

Basically, you are not going to find any differences between one practice and another, not really. Tibetan Buddhism these days is like Baskin Robbins, 31 flavors, but they all ice cream.

Forget about lineages and find a _guru_.

And keep in mind that often your root Guru may be in a completely different lineage than the one you actually practice in.

N
Buddhahood in This Life
འ༔ ཨ༔ ཧ༔ ཤ༔ ས༔ མ༔


[A]nything at all that is well spoken is the word of the Buddha.

-- Ārya-adhyāśaya-sañcodana-nāma-mahāyāna-sūtra

The different sūtras in accord with the emptiness
taught by the Sugata are definitive in meaning;
One can understand that all of those Dharmas in
which a sentient being, individual, or person are taught are provisional in meaning.

-- Samadhirāja Sūtra

Arnoud
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Joined: Sun Jul 18, 2010 7:19 pm

Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Arnoud » Fri Jul 15, 2011 3:55 pm

heart wrote:
Clarence wrote:
heart wrote: Hi C,

I really don't know because I met my teacher directly and received my first teachings and refuge from him as my first steps as a Buddhist, and he did amaze me. Then for many years I didn't have the opportunity to meet him and I tried to relate to some other teachers. That didn't really work out. Then I met him again and he made an even deeper impact. I started to realize that of all the teachers I met only he seemed to put his finger straight in to my heart. So the process wasn't fast at all. Took many years. Since I was very interested in Dzogchen I also had many intellectual issues about what teaching I wanted to practice and what my Guru seemed to give to his disciples. That was all I waste of time. Now I spent the last 17 years seeing him at least once a year and received many teachings from him. My wishes for Dzogchen teachings have also been fulfilled like a wish fulfilling jewel.

Tomorrow morning I leave to see him and I still have some butterflies in my stomach thinking of meeting him.

Lots of love
/magnus
Hi Magnus,

Thank you very much for your reply. I appreciate your personal story. Makes it more real and tangible.

I hope you have a great retreat. Where is it?

Best,

- C
In Austria, Rangjung Yeshe Gomde. Normally I go to Denmark but not this year.

/magnus
Have a great retreat. Keeping a blog is a good thing you know. :smile:

Arnoud
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Joined: Sun Jul 18, 2010 7:19 pm

Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Arnoud » Fri Jul 15, 2011 3:56 pm

gnegirl wrote:
Nothing formal that i know of. I made my own up at the time, very spontaneous and from the heart. However, i will see if i can work on cleaning up what i remember of it...

IMO, this sort of thing would be best coming straight from you, but a second-best might be some sort of already written prayer to get a start from.
Thanks Gnegirl. I am sure there are some formal ones, so no need to put in a lot of work. I appreciate it, but don't want to make you work for it.

C

Arnoud
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Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Arnoud » Fri Jul 15, 2011 3:59 pm

Namdrol wrote: Basically, you are not going to find any differences between one practice and another, not really. Tibetan Buddhism these days is like Baskin Robbins, 31 flavors, but they all ice cream.
Are you talking deity differences here or Lam Dre vs. 6 Yogas vs Dzogchen?
Forget about lineages and find a _guru_.
I think you are spot on here. Any suggestions on how to best proceed?
And keep in mind that often your root Guru may be in a completely different lineage than the one you actually practice in.
Would you mind elaborating on that? I don't understand it at all. Wouldn't you practice what the root Guru tells you to practice?

Best, C

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Paul
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Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Paul » Fri Jul 15, 2011 5:07 pm

heart wrote: I really don't know because I met my teacher directly and received my first teachings and refuge from him as my first steps as a Buddhist, and he did amaze me. Then for many years I didn't have the opportunity to meet him and I tried to relate to some other teachers. That didn't really work out. Then I met him again and he made an even deeper impact. I started to realize that of all the teachers I met only he seemed to put his finger straight in to my heart. So the process wasn't fast at all. Took many years. Since I was very interested in Dzogchen I also had many intellectual issues about what teaching I wanted to practice and what my Guru seemed to give to his disciples. That was all I waste of time. Now I spent the last 17 years seeing him at least once a year and received many teachings from him. My wishes for Dzogchen teachings have also been fulfilled like a wish fulfilling jewel.

Tomorrow morning I leave to see him and I still have some butterflies in my stomach thinking of meeting him.

Lots of love
/magnus
Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche, right?

I met him for the first time last week. I've never seen anyone quite like him. Could be the most impressive Buddhist master I've ever seen, especially when it comes to the four karmas.
Look at the unfathomable spinelessness of man: all the means he's been given to stay alert he uses, in the end, to ornament his sleep. – Rene Daumal
the modern mind has become so limited and single-visioned that it has lost touch with normal perception - John Michell

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Malcolm
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Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Malcolm » Fri Jul 15, 2011 7:13 pm

Clarence wrote: Are you talking deity differences here or Lam Dre vs. 6 Yogas vs Dzogchen?
Practice what you have instructions for, and that for which you have a predilection. Lamdre, 6 Yogas, and Dzogchen have slightly different toppings. But basically the practice is all the same.

I think you are spot on here. Any suggestions on how to best proceed?
Visit many of them.
Would you mind elaborating on that? I don't understand it at all. Wouldn't you practice what the root Guru tells you to practice?
Most people have this idea that their root guru is the one who gives them their main practice. That is not true. The root guru is the one who gives someone their understanding of the nature of their mind, which is what makes all practices fruitional.

N
Buddhahood in This Life
འ༔ ཨ༔ ཧ༔ ཤ༔ ས༔ མ༔


[A]nything at all that is well spoken is the word of the Buddha.

-- Ārya-adhyāśaya-sañcodana-nāma-mahāyāna-sūtra

The different sūtras in accord with the emptiness
taught by the Sugata are definitive in meaning;
One can understand that all of those Dharmas in
which a sentient being, individual, or person are taught are provisional in meaning.

-- Samadhirāja Sūtra

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ronnewmexico
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Re: Commitment Issues

Post by ronnewmexico » Fri Jul 15, 2011 7:41 pm

To my opinion there may be a cultural issue at play here a bit.

In these parts of the world from which Buddhism evolved and reflects, marriages and things of that sort are always and have been always arranged.
One then may or may not fall in love. The arrangement may indeed proceed from the moment of ones birth.

In western culture presently and for quite some time, ones marriage and things of that sort, were not arranged excepting for very few.
Entering into such things one fell in love, then married.

One in the west to my experience like as not, they fall in love with their spiritual teacher. At the inital, as in.... see him/her and you will know it is your teacher, your guru. Those peoples they are falling in love, not chooseing a spiritual teacher.
Then then become disappointed as lovers often become. It is not exact, but our relationships in this manner may have carryovers. It may work out on that basis and it may not. More it should be studied thoroughly to include circumstance, and then choose and then fall in love if one wants. I don't think that is at all necessary but that is a personal opinion.

So I remain with point....especially as I see it in the west.... it is most important to take a very long time to find a appropriate teacher, years.
Egoism on my part(this was stated earlier), has not a bit to do with it, it is a circumstantial opinion based upon observation.

Adding to my opinion. I have run accross recently, direct quote from HHDL stateing one should look at this thing of buddhism, spiritual practice, in a long long term timeframe. To do otherwise leads to discouragement disappointment and eventual abandonment. I can produce actual quote if requested and necessary.
So my nuance may be a personal interpretation, but in general, substantiation for this point of view may be found.
"This order considers that progress can be achieved more rapidly during a single month of self-transformation through terrifying conditions in rough terrain and in "the abode of harmful forces" than through meditating for a period of three years in towns and monasteries"....Takpo Tashi Namgyal.

Dharmaswede
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Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Dharmaswede » Sun Jul 17, 2011 10:01 am

I am probably just venting my own hangups here and mileage varies of course... but I think lack of consistency in one's practice often stems, at least in part, from psychological resistance. By psychological resistance I mean the technical term used in psychotherapy, which refers to all those behaviors, thoughts, and feelings which seeks to avoid the confrontational process (in want for a better term) in psychotherapy. I have noticed that the same psychological resistance can arise in my Buddhist practice. It can be anything from "forgetting" to meditate, to fantasizes about getting ahead by switching practices or teacher, a wavering faith in the Dharma etc. It can take just about any way, shape or form and can be very tricky to identify. (I would guess that most folks who's done ngondro has encountered resistance.)

My 5 cents...
1. If you haven't settled on a particular tradition or teacher, feel free browse around and try different things. But always make sure you finish what you started!
2. Don't take on more than you can handle. In particular, be very careful with commitments (be it life-long, or mantra quotas to be fulfilled etc.). It is so sad to hear about practitioners who have gotten so many advanced empowerments with so many commitments from so many traditions that they can't even keep up with the bare minimum requirements on a daily basis.
3. Keep a diary where you write down your thoughts on your choice of practices, your experiences etc. I bet you will be surprised down the road... Your diary will reveal your common sabotaging thoughts (excuses in the widest sense of the word), hopes, fantasies etc. – and how deceptive they are. As you become better at identifying your own patterns of resistance, you will learn not to fall for them. It definitely promotes self-knowledge to keep a diary.
4. Be watchful of knocking yourself down because of your practice (or lack thereof). Being self-critical and evaluating your practice is very important; an eroding self-esteem on the other hand will undermine the whole work.

Best Regards,

Jens

PS.
A fun book about and portrayal of resistance is The War of Art (by Steven Pressfield).
DS.

Dharmaswede
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Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Dharmaswede » Sun Jul 17, 2011 10:09 am

Shedra studies is an excellent option if one is not sure about what tradition or practice to follow in a committed way. There are quite a few good ones out there these days...

J.

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Mr. G
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Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Mr. G » Sun Jul 17, 2011 3:35 pm

Namdrol wrote:Most people have this idea that their root guru is the one who gives them their main practice. That is not true. The root guru is the one who gives someone their understanding of the nature of their mind, which is what makes all practices fruitional.

N
Hi Namdrol,

Question for you, what does it mean if a person finds a practice they like, but doesn't feel a strong connection to the Guru? Can a strong preference for a practice over-ride the lack of having a strong connection to a teacher?
  • How foolish you are,
    grasping the letter of the text and ignoring its intention!
    - Vasubandhu

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Malcolm
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Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Malcolm » Sun Jul 17, 2011 7:21 pm

mr. gordo wrote:
Namdrol wrote:Most people have this idea that their root guru is the one who gives them their main practice. That is not true. The root guru is the one who gives someone their understanding of the nature of their mind, which is what makes all practices fruitional.

N
Hi Namdrol,

Question for you, what does it mean if a person finds a practice they like, but doesn't feel a strong connection to the Guru? Can a strong preference for a practice over-ride the lack of having a strong connection to a teacher?
All Gurus are reflections of your root guru.

So yes, practice what you are attracted to.
Buddhahood in This Life
འ༔ ཨ༔ ཧ༔ ཤ༔ ས༔ མ༔


[A]nything at all that is well spoken is the word of the Buddha.

-- Ārya-adhyāśaya-sañcodana-nāma-mahāyāna-sūtra

The different sūtras in accord with the emptiness
taught by the Sugata are definitive in meaning;
One can understand that all of those Dharmas in
which a sentient being, individual, or person are taught are provisional in meaning.

-- Samadhirāja Sūtra

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Mr. G
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Location: Spaceship Earth

Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Mr. G » Sun Jul 17, 2011 7:23 pm

Namdrol wrote:
mr. gordo wrote:
Namdrol wrote:Most people have this idea that their root guru is the one who gives them their main practice. That is not true. The root guru is the one who gives someone their understanding of the nature of their mind, which is what makes all practices fruitional.

N
Hi Namdrol,

Question for you, what does it mean if a person finds a practice they like, but doesn't feel a strong connection to the Guru? Can a strong preference for a practice over-ride the lack of having a strong connection to a teacher?
All Gurus are reflections of your root guru.

So yes, practice what you are attracted to.
Thanks!
  • How foolish you are,
    grasping the letter of the text and ignoring its intention!
    - Vasubandhu

Arnoud
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Joined: Sun Jul 18, 2010 7:19 pm

Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Arnoud » Mon Jul 18, 2011 4:41 pm

Namdrol wrote:
Clarence wrote: Are you talking deity differences here or Lam Dre vs. 6 Yogas vs Dzogchen?
Practice what you have instructions for, and that for which you have a predilection. Lamdre, 6 Yogas, and Dzogchen have slightly different toppings. But basically the practice is all the same.

I think you are spot on here. Any suggestions on how to best proceed?
Visit many of them.
Would you mind elaborating on that? I don't understand it at all. Wouldn't you practice what the root Guru tells you to practice?
Most people have this idea that their root guru is the one who gives them their main practice. That is not true. The root guru is the one who gives someone their understanding of the nature of their mind, which is what makes all practices fruitional.

N
Thanks,

Arnoud
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Joined: Sun Jul 18, 2010 7:19 pm

Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Arnoud » Mon Jul 18, 2011 4:46 pm

ronnewmexico wrote:To my opinion there may be a cultural issue at play here a bit.

In these parts of the world from which Buddhism evolved and reflects, marriages and things of that sort are always and have been always arranged.
One then may or may not fall in love. The arrangement may indeed proceed from the moment of ones birth.

In western culture presently and for quite some time, ones marriage and things of that sort, were not arranged excepting for very few.
Entering into such things one fell in love, then married.
Yes, and I am pretty thankful my marriage wasn't arranged, though some of them grow to be lasting and very happy marriages. Some of them don't.
One in the west to my experience like as not, they fall in love with their spiritual teacher. At the inital, as in.... see him/her and you will know it is your teacher, your guru. Those peoples they are falling in love, not chooseing a spiritual teacher.
Never thought of it like that, but good point. Seen that happen.
Then then become disappointed as lovers often become. It is not exact, but our relationships in this manner may have carryovers. It may work out on that basis and it may not. More it should be studied thoroughly to include circumstance, and then choose and then fall in love if one wants. I don't think that is at all necessary but that is a personal opinion.
Yes, maturity probably plays a role as well.
So I remain with point....especially as I see it in the west.... it is most important to take a very long time to find a appropriate teacher, years.
Egoism on my part(this was stated earlier), has not a bit to do with it, it is a circumstantial opinion based upon observation.
Who stated you were egotistical? I think I was the only one who responded to that asking how long you took. None of my business, but still curious.
Adding to my opinion. I have run accross recently, direct quote from HHDL stateing one should look at this thing of buddhism, spiritual practice, in a long long term timeframe. To do otherwise leads to discouragement disappointment and eventual abandonment. I can produce actual quote if requested and necessary.
So my nuance may be a personal interpretation, but in general, substantiation for this point of view may be found.
Well, it is probably a good idea to look at it as a long term commitment. Equally important is the continuity in practice. You can meditate for years without ever really establishing a solid daily practice. Every time is like starting again then. Long term commitment is indeed important. Thanks for the reminder.

Arnoud
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Joined: Sun Jul 18, 2010 7:19 pm

Re: Commitment Issues

Post by Arnoud » Mon Jul 18, 2011 5:02 pm

Dharmaswede wrote:I am probably just venting my own hangups here and mileage varies of course... but I think lack of consistency in one's practice often stems, at least in part, from psychological resistance. By psychological resistance I mean the technical term used in psychotherapy, which refers to all those behaviors, thoughts, and feelings which seeks to avoid the confrontational process (in want for a better term) in psychotherapy. I have noticed that the same psychological resistance can arise in my Buddhist practice. It can be anything from "forgetting" to meditate, to fantasizes about getting ahead by switching practices or teacher, a wavering faith in the Dharma etc. It can take just about any way, shape or form and can be very tricky to identify. (I would guess that most folks who's done ngondro has encountered resistance.)
Glad to be able to finally put a word to it. :smile: But seriously, that is what is going on quite often.
My 5 cents...
1. If you haven't settled on a particular tradition or teacher, feel free browse around and try different things. But always make sure you finish what you started!
Well, then I still have quite a bit of work to do.
2. Don't take on more than you can handle. In particular, be very careful with commitments (be it life-long, or mantra quotas to be fulfilled etc.). It is so sad to hear about practitioners who have gotten so many advanced empowerments with so many commitments from so many traditions that they can't even keep up with the bare minimum requirements on a daily basis.
Yes, I agree and I don't.
PS.
A fun book about and portrayal of resistance is The War of Art (by Steven Pressfield).
DS.
I will look into that.

THanks Jens.

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