A small practice but a good one

Discuss the application of the Dharma to situations of social, political, environmental and economic suffering and injustice.
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catmoon
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A small practice but a good one

Post by catmoon » Wed Jun 05, 2019 8:54 am

I have for some years been in the habit of ending each social encounter by saying "Namaste". I was told that it essentially is an acknowledgement of the Buddha within the person you have been talking to. That may or may not be accurate, but hey if you want accuracy you can always ask Malcolm.

Now it turns out that if this practice is done mindfully, (by this i mean, each time you say namaste you think here is a Buddha or a Buddha in the making) well after while you start to see the Buddha within each person. That makes a difference.
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Grigoris
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Re: A small practice but a good one

Post by Grigoris » Wed Jun 05, 2019 9:30 am

catmoon wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 8:54 am
I have for some years been in the habit of ending each social encounter by saying "Namaste". I was told that it essentially is an acknowledgement of the Buddha within the person you have been talking to. That may or may not be accurate, but hey if you want accuracy you can always ask Malcolm.

Now it turns out that if this practice is done mindfully, (by this i mean, each time you say namaste you think here is a Buddha or a Buddha in the making) well after while you start to see the Buddha within each person. That makes a difference.
I have enough problems seeing the Buddha within me, let alone inside others! :tongue:

But you are right, it is a good practice and you don't necessarily have to use Indian salutations to pull it off.
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
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catmoon
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Re: A small practice but a good one

Post by catmoon » Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:04 am

Grigoris wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 9:30 am
I have enough problems seeing the Buddha within me, let alone inside others! :tongue:
Do you aspire to enlightenment? Look at the part of you that does. Have you ever felt compassion for the suffering of another? There sits the Buddha.
Same pretty much applies to anyone who has ever tried to be a better person, or tried to follow a code of ethics, however well or badly. But to actually see it in most of the people you meet, that takes a year or three.

And you are correct, you don't have to say "Namaste". I have it on good authority that "Baklava" works almost as well. You can also say "Geronimo" but then people look at you funny.
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Yavana
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Re: A small practice but a good one

Post by Yavana » Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:16 am

catmoon wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:04 am
And you are correct, you don't have to say "Namaste". I have it on good authority that "Baklava" works almost as well. You can also say "Geronimo" but then people look at you funny.
Give a peace sign / victory sign / "deuces" and say "respect?" Means, more or less, the same thing as "namaste," etymologically speaking. Maybe give an upward head nod, in acknowledgement of the other person, as you do it. Try it out next time you see someone on campus, in the office, at the airport, or on the golf course. PTA and homeowners association meeting gold for both giving, and maybe getting, respect between fellow sentients.

✌️RESPECT

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Re: A small practice but a good one

Post by joy&peace » Fri Jun 07, 2019 6:47 pm

Yes. Another thing is to look with clarity, or, emptiness.

If the heart is clear, then it's more possible to see clearly.

To look without clouding thoughts, etc.

And/or, with mindfulness of Buddha.

I.e., inwardly remembering Amitabha Buddha, or meditating on emptiness as in Zen, etc., Then looking at others.

And also, Namaste.

But the essence, beyond words, is the same.
Om Gate Gate Paragate Parasamgate bodhi svaha

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Johnny Dangerous
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Re: A small practice but a good one

Post by Johnny Dangerous » Fri Jun 07, 2019 6:50 pm

I like the handshake, in whatever appropriate form.

True or not, the legend about it being a way of showing that one is unarmed and peaceful is a good reminder.
There's no hoarding what has vanished,
No piling up for the future;
Those who have been born are standing
Like a seed upon a needle.

-Guhatthaka-suttaniddeso

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Queequeg
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Re: A small practice but a good one

Post by Queequeg » Fri Jun 07, 2019 7:32 pm

Part of my daily practice is done while walking through busy train and subway stations, down the sidewalks, etc. Cultivating clarity, equanimity, compassion. I look at each person and wonder who they will be as buddha.

And then I'm roused from my contemplation by a hard shoulder and a guy yelling, "I'm walking here!"
Those who, even with distracted minds,
Entered a stupa compound
And chanted but once, “Namo Buddhaya!”
Have certainly attained the path of the buddhas.

-Lotus Sutra, Expedient Means Chapter

There are beings with little dust in their eyes who are falling away because they do not hear the Dhamma. There will be those who will understand the Dhamma.
-Ayacana Sutta

joy&peace
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Re: A small practice but a good one

Post by joy&peace » Fri Jun 07, 2019 8:40 pm

Skillful means, Queequeg :rolling: hehe
Om Gate Gate Paragate Parasamgate bodhi svaha

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Re: A small practice but a good one

Post by narhwal90 » Fri Jun 07, 2019 9:33 pm

I had a dream once where said namaste w/ a fist-bump instead of the anjali mudra- got the fist-bump back too.... :lol:

joy&peace
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Re: A small practice but a good one

Post by joy&peace » Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:22 pm

That sounds like a good one :)

I also am reminded of the idea, to view all as Buddhas, but, another way may be to see all with no blame... And, to cultivate metta with meditation and so forth... To speak with loving kindness as muuh as possible..

It helps to travel, when we see someplace new, it is fresh and refreshing.

Then of course it's also great be where people know you, smile and say hi (or another)..

Anjali fist bump, narwhal :)
Om Gate Gate Paragate Parasamgate bodhi svaha

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well wisher
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Re: A small practice but a good one

Post by well wisher » Mon Jun 10, 2019 2:13 pm

catmoon wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 8:54 am
I have for some years been in the habit of ending each social encounter by saying "Namaste". I was told that it essentially is an acknowledgement of the Buddha within the person you have been talking to. That may or may not be accurate, but hey if you want accuracy you can always ask Malcolm.
Now it turns out that if this practice is done mindfully, (by this i mean, each time you say namaste you think here is a Buddha or a Buddha in the making) well after while you start to see the Buddha within each person. That makes a difference.
I like this idea as a form of more engaged active mindful practice of Metta (loving kindness), and respect for other people. :thumbsup:

But I wonder, do you actually say "Namaste" out loud to strangers, or only to people you know?
Because I imagine some people of other religious denominations might take offence to the "Namaste" word, especially if they think too highly of their own religion (ie. too prideful), and shun all other religion as inferior, as to associate the word "Namaste" to Buddhist /Veldic religions...
Or maybe I am just paranoid or being too shy :tongue:

Anyways, is it OK if I say namaste just quietly in my mind, especially after social encounters with strangers or those of other faiths?
:namaste:

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