purest meditation practice

Discussion of meditation in the Mahayana and Vajrayana traditions.
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amanitamusc
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purest meditation practice

Post by amanitamusc » Wed Aug 12, 2015 5:32 am

Is Nembutsu the purest form of Buddhist meditation practice?

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Astus
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Re: purest meditation practice

Post by Astus » Wed Aug 12, 2015 11:27 am

Purest by what standard? And what form of nenbutsu do you mean?
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

amanitamusc
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Re: purest meditation practice

Post by amanitamusc » Wed Aug 12, 2015 3:50 pm

Astus wrote:Purest by what standard? And what form of nenbutsu do you mean?
Purest as in the most highly regarded and that one practices. Any form of Nembutsu compared to
any other Buddhist meditation practices one has done.

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Astus
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Re: purest meditation practice

Post by Astus » Wed Aug 12, 2015 5:33 pm

amanitamusc wrote:Purest as in the most highly regarded and that one practices. Any form of Nembutsu compared to any other Buddhist meditation practices one has done.
Those who regard it most highly are often called Pure Land practitioners. Others regard other methods as the best.
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

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avisitor
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Re: purest meditation practice

Post by avisitor » Thu Aug 13, 2015 9:29 pm

The Buddha gave us 84 thousand Dharma doors
He didn't give in them in any particular order

Serenity509
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Location: United States

Re: purest meditation practice

Post by Serenity509 » Sat Aug 15, 2015 2:34 am

In order to understand Jodo Shinshu practice within the context of Buddhism as a whole, it's helpful to consider the meaning of terms.
The original meaning of Namu Amida Butsu is "Hail, Amida Buddha."
The word Amida means "infinite light." The word Buddha means "one who is awake." By saying "Hail, Amida Buddha," then, you are calling forth your inner Buddha-nature, that infinite light within you and surrounding you that transcends your ego-self, and connects you with all living beings.

The beauty of the Nembutsu is in its simplicity. It can be practiced anywhere, at any time, without esoteric rituals or hours of intense meditation. You need only to call out your Amida-nature and become aware of it. The image of Amida on the altar or in your home, rather than a divine being outside you, is a mirror of your true self.

By saying that the Nembutsu is the "purest" form of practice, then, what that means is that it's so simple, yet so profound. It's a simple practice that can be carried out by anyone, at any time. It helps to cut through the ego, without having to learn intense instruction from a guru.

I could go more into detail about these things, but I am trying to avoid an argument. I would suggest, then, to please look up these things for yourself. I don't believe that Jodo Shinshu is better than other Buddhist schools, but it is easier to practice, in a good and helpful way.

amanitamusc
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Re: purest meditation practice

Post by amanitamusc » Sat Aug 15, 2015 3:32 am

Serenity509 wrote:In order to understand Jodo Shinshu practice within the context of Buddhism as a whole, it's helpful to consider the meaning of terms.
The original meaning of Namu Amida Butsu is "Hail, Amida Buddha."
The word Amida means "infinite light." The word Buddha means "one who is awake." By saying "Hail, Amida Buddha," then, you are calling forth your inner Buddha-nature, that infinite light within you and surrounding you that transcends your ego-self, and connects you with all living beings.

The beauty of the Nembutsu is in its simplicity. It can be practiced anywhere, at any time, without esoteric rituals or hours of intense meditation. You need only to call out your Amida-nature and become aware of it. The image of Amida on the altar or in your home, rather than a divine being outside you, is a mirror of your true self.

By saying that the Nembutsu is the "purest" form of practice, then, what that means is that it's so simple, yet so profound. It's a simple practice that can be carried out by anyone, at any time. It helps to cut through the ego, without having to learn intense instruction from a guru.

I could go more into detail about these things, but I am trying to avoid an argument. I would suggest, then, to please look up these things for yourself. I don't believe that Jodo Shinshu is better than other Buddhist schools, but it is easier to practice, in a good and helpful way.
When you say "true self"do you mean a soul?
What other schools of Bhuddhism have you practiced that were not as pure and more difficult to
lead you to this statement ?
Is there no beauty in esoteric ritual?

Serenity509
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Location: United States

Re: purest meditation practice

Post by Serenity509 » Sat Aug 15, 2015 5:20 pm

There are hopefully other members of this forum willing to further elaborate on these things for you. I, for one, am avoiding being drawn into another petty argument.

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