Retreat Centers

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TharpaChodron
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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by TharpaChodron » Wed May 29, 2019 9:41 pm

humble.student wrote:
Wed May 29, 2019 1:48 pm
TharpaChodron wrote:Sounds great what you are doing. I think I'd like to be a part of a Dharma community one day. I'm surprised there isn't already an existing Vajrayana retirement community somehwhere...
I was just going to say that I saw there is indeed such a place in France, I saw an ad in a dharma centre's book catalogue last week. Given that it's in France, it probably includes 3 square meals and a bottle of wine a day... Joking aside, I would surprised if there wasn't already something like that in the US somewhere.
Now that sounds like my type of Buddhist retirement! Link please? :anjali:

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by TharpaChodron » Wed May 29, 2019 10:36 pm

Nemo wrote:
Wed May 29, 2019 1:49 pm
This is an important topic. I have spent a few years of my life looking after practitioners who did not give this subject any attention. Too old to work some have been pushed out of temples and monasteries.

I'm not sure a center is the best idea for retirement. They are often periodically filled with mentally unstable people, constantly in states of financial distress and under strict hierarchical command. Even your sex life and dating are controlled. Like it or not all your life decisions and spending will be scrutinized. If you have other means I would suggest living NEAR a retreat center. They are places to learn. If you love solitude and have made friends with yourself they may not be ideal locations for retreat.

My ideal solution would be one seen in old Tibet. Freehold town homes on an edge of the property. Living beside practitioners is sublime. Shared accommodation is not IMO. I don't know of anywhere in North America where this is done though.
Living nearby but not actually in a retreat center could be ideal. I want to be a part of community and I like socializing with people. The retreat environment may be far too restrictive for me to actually live full-time there, if it's like I'm hearing. my idea is probably a bit of a cop out, enjoy the comforts and freedoms of home while being involved and connected to a community. I think our Buddhist groups should be working more towards that goal.

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by Nicholas Weeks » Wed May 29, 2019 10:46 pm

TharpaChodron wrote:
Wed May 29, 2019 10:36 pm

Living nearby but not actually in a retreat center could be ideal. I want to be a part of community and I like socializing with people. The retreat environment may be far too restrictive for me to actually live full-time there, if it's like I'm hearing. my idea is probably a bit of a cop out, enjoy the comforts and freedoms of home while being involved and connected to a community. I think our Buddhist groups should be working more towards that goal.
The City of 10,000 Buddhas near Ukiah, CA is a possibility. (Not much if any Vajrayana though) Although the percentage of non-Chinese/Vietnamese who attend or participate is small.
Glorious one, creator of all goodness, Mañjuśrī, his glorious eminence!
Manjushri-namasamgiti

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by smcj » Wed May 29, 2019 11:14 pm

When you’re talking to places be careful about using the word “retreat “. Most traditional TB places will understand that to mean isolated full time meditation practice. They might even think you’re interested in a cloistered group 3 year retreat where you sleep sitting up in your meditation box.If you’re not looking for that don’t say “retreat”. Say “a place to live & develop my practice“ or some such thing.

Some places are built on the basis of a single lama. When he dies it loses its direction. It might still be a nice place & nice people, just no drive behind it. Could be cheaper that way too.
1. No traditional Buddhist sect, Tibetan or otherwise, considers deities to be fictional. (DW post/Seeker242)
2. I support Mingyur R and HHDL in their positions against Lama abuse.
3. Student: Lama, I thought I might die but then I realized that the 3 Jewels would protect me.
Lama: Even If you had died the 3 Jewels would still have protected you. (DW post by Fortyeightvows)
4. Shentong] is the completely pure system that, through mainly teaching the luminous aspect of the mind, holds that the fruitions--kayas and wisdoms--exist on their own accord. (Karmapa XIII)

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by Nemo » Thu May 30, 2019 12:06 am

Retirement is interesting. The amount of freedom can evoke some strange feelings. It's not a weekend or a vacation. You are truly free for the first time. People still in the rat race don't understand and can't relate to it. You can volunteer and stuff but you start drifting away. Retreat and finding other people who are also free seems to be the best way to spend your time. Going to a place to be told what to do might be too jarring. People running centers often treat people like children needing guidance. At retirement age you need to be an adult. It seems on my more cynical days a large part of monastic life is keeping young horny people busy and out of trouble. Though ordination at retirement is nice for some people.

I have often heard talk of building Buddhist retirement homes but it never seems to be a priority. Older Tibetan Lamas sometimes build them in India. Forming lasting communities anywhere under late capitalism seems almost impossible.

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by smcj » Thu May 30, 2019 12:48 am

Since this is in the Nyingma Forum is like to mention Gyaltrul R’s place in Southern Oregon and Chagdud Tilku’s Place in Northern California. I been to both for short visits only, but liked them.


Sangye Khandro hangs out here I believe.
http://www.tashicholing.org/

https://chagdudgonpa.org/visiting-our-center/

Also this place in New York State.
https://www.padmasambhava.org/

I’ve been here a couple of times. The Khenpo winters elsewhere so it hibernates. But good people with a good teacher.
1. No traditional Buddhist sect, Tibetan or otherwise, considers deities to be fictional. (DW post/Seeker242)
2. I support Mingyur R and HHDL in their positions against Lama abuse.
3. Student: Lama, I thought I might die but then I realized that the 3 Jewels would protect me.
Lama: Even If you had died the 3 Jewels would still have protected you. (DW post by Fortyeightvows)
4. Shentong] is the completely pure system that, through mainly teaching the luminous aspect of the mind, holds that the fruitions--kayas and wisdoms--exist on their own accord. (Karmapa XIII)

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by humble.student » Thu May 30, 2019 1:55 am

TharpaChodron wrote:
Wed May 29, 2019 9:41 pm
humble.student wrote:
Wed May 29, 2019 1:48 pm
TharpaChodron wrote:Sounds great what you are doing. I think I'd like to be a part of a Dharma community one day. I'm surprised there isn't already an existing Vajrayana retirement community somehwhere...
I was just going to say that I saw there is indeed such a place in France, I saw an ad in a dharma centre's book catalogue last week. Given that it's in France, it probably includes 3 square meals and a bottle of wine a day... Joking aside, I would surprised if there wasn't already something like that in the US somewhere.
Now that sounds like my type of Buddhist retirement! Link please? :anjali:
http://www.yogi-ling.net/Oasis/oasisdelonguevie.htm
http://www.123siteweb.fr/SeniorsduDharma

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TharpaChodron
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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by TharpaChodron » Thu May 30, 2019 7:02 pm

humble.student wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 1:55 am
TharpaChodron wrote:
Wed May 29, 2019 9:41 pm
humble.student wrote:
Wed May 29, 2019 1:48 pm


I was just going to say that I saw there is indeed such a place in France, I saw an ad in a dharma centre's book catalogue last week. Given that it's in France, it probably includes 3 square meals and a bottle of wine a day... Joking aside, I would surprised if there wasn't already something like that in the US somewhere.
Now that sounds like my type of Buddhist retirement! Link please? :anjali:
http://www.yogi-ling.net/Oasis/oasisdelonguevie.htm
http://www.123siteweb.fr/SeniorsduDharma
Merci! C'est magnifique, I will look into it...

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by TharpaChodron » Sun Jun 02, 2019 12:01 am

Nemo wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 12:06 am
Retirement is interesting. The amount of freedom can evoke some strange feelings. It's not a weekend or a vacation. You are truly free for the first time. People still in the rat race don't understand and can't relate to it. You can volunteer and stuff but you start drifting away. Retreat and finding other people who are also free seems to be the best way to spend your time. Going to a place to be told what to do might be too jarring. People running centers often treat people like children needing guidance. At retirement age you need to be an adult. It seems on my more cynical days a large part of monastic life is keeping young horny people busy and out of trouble. Though ordination at retirement is nice for some people.

I have often heard talk of building Buddhist retirement homes but it never seems to be a priority. Older Tibetan Lamas sometimes build them in India. Forming lasting communities anywhere under late capitalism seems almost impossible.
I'm a long ways from the luxury of retiring, but I have these non-Buddhist coworkers that like to go on and on about how they long to retire...a pretty dismal way to live one's life imo. This thread actually made me think a bit deeper about my hopes and fears regarding retirement. It's a bit of a samsaric fantasy, at least for me. It is important though to prepare for the future, as your story about taking care of elderly practitioners demonstrates.

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by Nemo » Sun Jun 02, 2019 3:17 pm

TharpaChodron wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 12:01 am
Nemo wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 12:06 am
Retirement is interesting. The amount of freedom can evoke some strange feelings. It's not a weekend or a vacation. You are truly free for the first time. People still in the rat race don't understand and can't relate to it. You can volunteer and stuff but you start drifting away. Retreat and finding other people who are also free seems to be the best way to spend your time. Going to a place to be told what to do might be too jarring. People running centers often treat people like children needing guidance. At retirement age you need to be an adult. It seems on my more cynical days a large part of monastic life is keeping young horny people busy and out of trouble. Though ordination at retirement is nice for some people.

I have often heard talk of building Buddhist retirement homes but it never seems to be a priority. Older Tibetan Lamas sometimes build them in India. Forming lasting communities anywhere under late capitalism seems almost impossible.
I'm a long ways from the luxury of retiring, but I have these non-Buddhist coworkers that like to go on and on about how they long to retire...a pretty dismal way to live one's life imo. This thread actually made me think a bit deeper about my hopes and fears regarding retirement. It's a bit of a samsaric fantasy, at least for me. It is important though to prepare for the future, as your story about taking care of elderly practitioners demonstrates.
It seems to be taboo to talk about being free. There does not seem to be a model to grow old elegantly. Many people do it very poorly. Being in the military they thought it best if we retired early since some skills are better taken off the market.

Lao Tzu is passing through a forest, and the forest is being cut. Thousands of carpenters are cutting the trees. Then he comes near a big tree—a very big tree, one thousand bullock carts can rest underneath it—and it is so green and beautiful. He sends his disciples to inquire of the carpenters why this tree has not been cut yet.
And they say ‘It is useless. You cannot make anything out of it: furniture cannot be made, it cannot be used as fuel—it gives too much smoke. It is of no use. That’s why we have not cut it.’
And Lao Tzu says to his disciples ‘Learn from this tree. Become as useless as this tree then nobody will cut you.’

Uselessness has great value.

He says: Look, and watch this tree. Learn something from this tree. This tree is great. Look, all the trees are gone. They were useful, hence they are gone. Some tree was very straight, that’s why it is gone. It must have been very egoistic, straight, proud of being somebody—it is gone. This tree is not straight, not a single branch is straight. It is not proud at all. Hence it exists.

Lao Tzu tells his disciples: ‘If you want to live long, become useless.’ Don’t become a commodity, don’t become a thing. If you become a thing you will be sold and purchased in the market, and you will become a slave. If you are not a thing, who can purchase you and who can sell you? Remain unmade. Don’t become a human commodity and nobody will be able to use you. And if nobody is able to use you, you will have a beautiful life of your own, independent, free, joyful. If nobody can use you, nobody can reduce you to a means. You will never be insulted, because in this life there is no greater insult than to become a means: somebody or other is going to use you—your body, your mind, your being.

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by pemachophel » Sun Jun 02, 2019 5:43 pm

I started working part time when I hit 60 so I could devote 7-8 hours a day to practice (three hours before breakfast and four in the afternoon). At 65, I retired completely with absolutely no regrets and do 3.5-4 sessions per day with some evening group practices added in on top. It's now been eight years in almost complete home retreat. Sometimes I think it'd be nice to go into retreat at a retreat center or else deep in the woods in a remote place. However, it's a fact of life that, as you get older, health issues tend to crop up. One of the most common reasons for leaving my house is visits to this or that doctor, and I don't think it'd be wise for me to be more than 30-45 minutes from a really good hospital. I also need to be near a pharmacy and I need a phone to call in my prescriptions. So in planning for post-retirement retreat, you definitely should take the probability of some health issues into account, even if you are totally healthy right now. Before I was in my early 60s, I was totally healthy and couldn't conceive I'd be dealing with the health issues I have now. In any case, home retreat is quite doable. I even retrofitted my shrine so it can function as a dark retreat. I practice more than many Lamas and monks I know. I live in an area where there are many Vajrayana Buddhists and it always astounds me how few of my retired Buddhist friends spend their time practicing.

Also, don't wait till retirement to do as much retreat as possible. When you get old, your nadis, vayus, and bindus are all deteriorating. So getting results from practice tends to be harder -- at least some kinds of practices and some kinds of results. You also physically cannot do all the practices you might like to, such as lots of long prostrations, bebs, etc. At least that's my experience.
Pema Chophel པདྨ་ཆོས་འཕེལ

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by TharpaChodron » Sun Jun 02, 2019 11:43 pm

Nemo wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 3:17 pm
TharpaChodron wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 12:01 am
Nemo wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 12:06 am
Retirement is interesting. The amount of freedom can evoke some strange feelings. It's not a weekend or a vacation. You are truly free for the first time. People still in the rat race don't understand and can't relate to it. You can volunteer and stuff but you start drifting away. Retreat and finding other people who are also free seems to be the best way to spend your time. Going to a place to be told what to do might be too jarring. People running centers often treat people like children needing guidance. At retirement age you need to be an adult. It seems on my more cynical days a large part of monastic life is keeping young horny people busy and out of trouble. Though ordination at retirement is nice for some people.

I have often heard talk of building Buddhist retirement homes but it never seems to be a priority. Older Tibetan Lamas sometimes build them in India. Forming lasting communities anywhere under late capitalism seems almost impossible.
I'm a long ways from the luxury of retiring, but I have these non-Buddhist coworkers that like to go on and on about how they long to retire...a pretty dismal way to live one's life imo. This thread actually made me think a bit deeper about my hopes and fears regarding retirement. It's a bit of a samsaric fantasy, at least for me. It is important though to prepare for the future, as your story about taking care of elderly practitioners demonstrates.
It seems to be taboo to talk about being free. There does not seem to be a model to grow old elegantly. Many people do it very poorly. Being in the military they thought it best if we retired early since some skills are better taken off the market.

Lao Tzu is passing through a forest, and the forest is being cut. Thousands of carpenters are cutting the trees. Then he comes near a big tree—a very big tree, one thousand bullock carts can rest underneath it—and it is so green and beautiful. He sends his disciples to inquire of the carpenters why this tree has not been cut yet.
And they say ‘It is useless. You cannot make anything out of it: furniture cannot be made, it cannot be used as fuel—it gives too much smoke. It is of no use. That’s why we have not cut it.’
And Lao Tzu says to his disciples ‘Learn from this tree. Become as useless as this tree then nobody will cut you.’

Uselessness has great value.

He says: Look, and watch this tree. Learn something from this tree. This tree is great. Look, all the trees are gone. They were useful, hence they are gone. Some tree was very straight, that’s why it is gone. It must have been very egoistic, straight, proud of being somebody—it is gone. This tree is not straight, not a single branch is straight. It is not proud at all. Hence it exists.

Lao Tzu tells his disciples: ‘If you want to live long, become useless.’ Don’t become a commodity, don’t become a thing. If you become a thing you will be sold and purchased in the market, and you will become a slave. If you are not a thing, who can purchase you and who can sell you? Remain unmade. Don’t become a human commodity and nobody will be able to use you. And if nobody is able to use you, you will have a beautiful life of your own, independent, free, joyful. If nobody can use you, nobody can reduce you to a means. You will never be insulted, because in this life there is no greater insult than to become a means: somebody or other is going to use you—your body, your mind, your being.
Yep, some professions do encourage earlier retirement, like police officers. Probably it's a much greater liability having older people doing that type of work as they age. My stepdad is an ex-Marine, but his Midwest farm boy upbringing makes retirement challenging for him. He retired three times and hated it. He now runs his own nonprofit and he's more physically active than many people half his age. Anyhow, everyone is different (in a relative way). Playing bingo or slot machines isn't for everyone.

Nice story from Lao Tzu. From what I gather, a lot
of people could learn from those teachings, but
I also think there should be a balance. Having some sort of purpose is associated with happiness for retired folks, however, maybe that's a problem, especially when one's career and hobbies etc don't lend themselves to transferable skills or activities that society actually values.

Nevertheless, not giving a damn, being happy and completely useless is a great thing. My neighbor retired from an intense job as lead public defender for the county. His passion is really gardening and I've never met a more relaxed guy, always puttering around his garden barefoot and fancy free.

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Nemo
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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by Nemo » Mon Jun 03, 2019 1:41 am

Many worldly states are very addictive. It's easy to avoid the obvious pitfalls. It's the subtle ones that will keep you trapped life after life. Being needed, feeling like you are helping, sacrificing for the cause, simply being good at something....These things are very sexy, but they will not liberate you.

But ya, gardening is kind of awesome.

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by TharpaChodron » Mon Jun 03, 2019 2:14 am

pemachophel wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 5:43 pm
I started working part time when I hit 60 so I could devote 7-8 hours a day to practice (three hours before breakfast and four in the afternoon). At 65, I retired completely with absolutely no regrets and do 3.5-4 sessions per day with some evening group practices added in on top. It's now been eight years in almost complete home retreat. Sometimes I think it'd be nice to go into retreat at a retreat center or else deep in the woods in a remote place. However, it's a fact of life that, as you get older, health issues tend to crop up. One of the most common reasons for leaving my house is visits to this or that doctor, and I don't think it'd be wise for me to be more than 30-45 minutes from a really good hospital. I also need to be near a pharmacy and I need a phone to call in my prescriptions. So in planning for post-retirement retreat, you definitely should take the probability of some health issues into account, even if you are totally healthy right now. Before I was in my early 60s, I was totally healthy and couldn't conceive I'd be dealing with the health issues I have now. In any case, home retreat is quite doable. I even retrofitted my shrine so it can function as a dark retreat. I practice more than many Lamas and monks I know. I live in an area where there are many Vajrayana Buddhists and it always astounds me how few of my retired Buddhist friends spend their time practicing.

Also, don't wait till retirement to do as much retreat as possible. When you get old, your nadis, vayus, and bindus are all deteriorating. So getting results from practice tends to be harder -- at least some kinds of practices and some kinds of results. You also physically cannot do all the practices you might like to, such as lots of long prostrations, bebs, etc. At least that's my experience.
Excellent points and thank you for such a thoughtful response. One's health has to be a big consideration in the future. What you have created as far as a personal practice environment is wonderful. Even though we all have the same outside circumstances when growing older, it does strike me as fortunate that Buddhists have a lifelong vocation towards enlightenment, to keep working on and engaging in, which keeps one very focused as is your case. Even though most of us may never be as disciplined as yourself to engage in practice so deeply.
Thanks for your inspiration.

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by n8pee » Mon Jun 03, 2019 2:41 am

pemachophel wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 5:43 pm
I started working part time when I hit 60 so I could devote 7-8 hours a day to practice (three hours before breakfast and four in the afternoon). At 65, I retired completely with absolutely no regrets and do 3.5-4 sessions per day with some evening group practices added in on top. It's now been eight years in almost complete home retreat. Sometimes I think it'd be nice to go into retreat at a retreat center or else deep in the woods in a remote place. However, it's a fact of life that, as you get older, health issues tend to crop up. One of the most common reasons for leaving my house is visits to this or that doctor, and I don't think it'd be wise for me to be more than 30-45 minutes from a really good hospital. I also need to be near a pharmacy and I need a phone to call in my prescriptions. So in planning for post-retirement retreat, you definitely should take the probability of some health issues into account, even if you are totally healthy right now. Before I was in my early 60s, I was totally healthy and couldn't conceive I'd be dealing with the health issues I have now. In any case, home retreat is quite doable. I even retrofitted my shrine so it can function as a dark retreat. I practice more than many Lamas and monks I know. I live in an area where there are many Vajrayana Buddhists and it always astounds me how few of my retired Buddhist friends spend their time practicing.

Also, don't wait till retirement to do as much retreat as possible. When you get old, your nadis, vayus, and bindus are all deteriorating. So getting results from practice tends to be harder -- at least some kinds of practices and some kinds of results. You also physically cannot do all the practices you might like to, such as lots of long prostrations, bebs, etc. At least that's my experience.
You, sir, are an inspiration. I just turned 40, but have a newborn and a 3.5 year old at home. The newborn has torn apart my practice schedule, but I try not to spend too much time agonizing over it with the knowledge that I will pick up more hours in the day as time passes, and hopefully by the time I am closer to your age I will be able to accommodate a similar commitment to practice. I'd like to inquire a bit further into your experience and will reach out to you directly.

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by pemachophel » Mon Jun 03, 2019 4:15 pm

Practice has nothing to do with outer circumstances. Maybe the birth of your most recent child has reduced your time on the cushion, but it's done nothing to your mind. Your mind is exactly as free and unencumbered as it always has been. Since our practice of Bodhicitta is predicated on the recognition that every sentient has been our own mother, every act of parenting is especially easy to turn into an act of Dharma. (FYI, I am a father myself although my child is long grown up. So I have some experience in this regard.) Below are some of the first methods that immediately come to mind.

Cradling your child: Just as I cradle this child, may I bring benefit and ease to all sentient beings who have all been my mother and cradled me in their love.

Feeding your child: Just as I feed this child, may I feed all sentient beings with my love and compassion and may all sentient beings be nurtured by the truth of the Buddhadharma.

Putting your child to sleep: Just as I put this child to bed safe and sound, may I bring all sentient beings to the ultimate rest and ease of complete, unsurpassed Enlightenment.

Changing diapers: Just as I wipe this baby's butt, may I wipe away all the sin and obscuration of all sentient beings and free them from the muck of samsara. (You may choose to substitute some other word for "muck.")

Singing to your child: Of course, sings prayers, mantras, and dharanis.

Taking your child for a stroll: Just as I take this child for a stroll, may I lead all sentient beings to the pure field of Sukhavati.

Good luck & best wishes.
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smcj
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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by smcj » Tue Jun 04, 2019 3:06 am

Below are some of the first methods that immediately come to mind...
I live at a monastery and don’t utilize my time that well.

:bow:
1. No traditional Buddhist sect, Tibetan or otherwise, considers deities to be fictional. (DW post/Seeker242)
2. I support Mingyur R and HHDL in their positions against Lama abuse.
3. Student: Lama, I thought I might die but then I realized that the 3 Jewels would protect me.
Lama: Even If you had died the 3 Jewels would still have protected you. (DW post by Fortyeightvows)
4. Shentong] is the completely pure system that, through mainly teaching the luminous aspect of the mind, holds that the fruitions--kayas and wisdoms--exist on their own accord. (Karmapa XIII)

n8pee
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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by n8pee » Tue Jun 04, 2019 3:57 am

pemachophel wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 4:15 pm
Practice has nothing to do with outer circumstances. Maybe the birth of your most recent child has reduced your time on the cushion, but it's done nothing to your mind. Your mind is exactly as free and unencumbered as it always has been. Since our practice of Bodhicitta is predicated on the recognition that every sentient has been our own mother, every act of parenting is especially easy to turn into an act of Dharma. (FYI, I am a father myself although my child is long grown up. So I have some experience in this regard.) Below are some of the first methods that immediately come to mind.

Cradling your child: Just as I cradle this child, may I bring benefit and ease to all sentient beings who have all been my mother and cradled me in their love.

Feeding your child: Just as I feed this child, may I feed all sentient beings with my love and compassion and may all sentient beings be nurtured by the truth of the Buddhadharma.

Putting your child to sleep: Just as I put this child to bed safe and sound, may I bring all sentient beings to the ultimate rest and ease of complete, unsurpassed Enlightenment.

Changing diapers: Just as I wipe this baby's butt, may I wipe away all the sin and obscuration of all sentient beings and free them from the muck of samsara. (You may choose to substitute some other word for "muck.")

Singing to your child: Of course, sings prayers, mantras, and dharanis.

Taking your child for a stroll: Just as I take this child for a stroll, may I lead all sentient beings to the pure field of Sukhavati.

Good luck & best wishes.
Many thanks for your response. Indeed, having a child actually has allowed me to more meaningfully develop bodhicitta. Personally, I have found it stronger than the traditional exercise of viewing all sentient beings as your mother. With my life as it is currently, viewing all sentient being as my child has resulted in a much stronger approach to practice.

Additionally, feeding a newborn can take over an hour - which is an ideal time for practice!

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by drodul » Wed Jun 05, 2019 4:50 am

What are "bebs?"

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Re: Retreat Centers

Post by Nemo » Wed Jun 05, 2019 6:26 pm

a great article touching on retirement and practice.
https://www.buddhistdoor.net/features/t ... psychology

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