Chinese zodiac

Forum for discussion of East Asian Buddhism. Questions specific to one school are best posted in the appropriate sub-forum.
Post Reply
pael
Posts: 545
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 12:49 pm

Chinese zodiac

Post by pael » Fri Aug 19, 2016 4:40 pm

According this
In Buddhism, legend has it that Buddha summoned all of the animals of the earth to come before him before his departure from this earth, but only 12 animals actually came to bid him farewell. To reward the animals who came to him, he named a year after each of them. The years were given to them in the order they had arrived.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_zodiac
Is this from sutras?
May all beings be free from suffering and causes of suffering

Matylda
Posts: 654
Joined: Mon May 14, 2012 3:32 pm

Re: Chinese zodiac

Post by Matylda » Fri Aug 19, 2016 5:08 pm

pael wrote:According this
In Buddhism, legend has it that Buddha summoned all of the animals of the earth to come before him before his departure from this earth, but only 12 animals actually came to bid him farewell. To reward the animals who came to him, he named a year after each of them. The years were given to them in the order they had arrived.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_zodiac
Is this from sutras?
i would guess it is rather nice Chinese legend

User avatar
Footsteps
Posts: 69
Joined: Sat Sep 03, 2016 7:53 pm

Re: Chinese zodiac

Post by Footsteps » Mon Sep 05, 2016 11:08 am

No Chinese to verify or disqualify this on the forum?
"Don't interrupt the mountains or the lake."

User avatar
Coëmgenu
Posts: 1752
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:35 pm
Location: Whitby, Ontario

Re: Chinese zodiac

Post by Coëmgenu » Mon Sep 05, 2016 4:17 pm

Footsteps wrote:No Chinese to verify or disqualify this on the forum?
I am not Chinese, but I can tell you that the story of Buddha and the 12 animals doesn't come from the āgamas or the Pali Canon. It could come from a regional Mahayana Sutra, but I personally doubt this story is authentic Buddhadharma, because what purpose would it serve? How is it part of the teaching? It's not bad necessarily, it just doesn't sound like Buddha's usual useful style.

Is there a tradition in Chinese sutras of Buddha teaching extensively to animals? I suspect not, but it's possible.
नस्वातो नापिपरतो नद्वाभ्यां नाप्यहेतुतः उत्पन्ना जातु विद्यन्ते भावाः क्वचन केचन
There absolutely are no things, nowhere and none, that arise anew, neither out of themselves, nor out of non-self, nor out of both, nor at random.
सर्वं तथ्यं न वा तथ्यं तथ्यं चातथ्यम् एव च नैवातथ्यं नैव तथ्यम् एतद् बुद्धानुशासनम्
All is so, or all is not so, both so and not so, neither so nor not so. This is the Buddha's teaching.

一切實非實亦實亦非實
非實非非實是名諸佛法

sillyrabbit
Posts: 133
Joined: Wed Feb 24, 2016 3:47 am

Re: Chinese zodiac

Post by sillyrabbit » Sat Sep 10, 2016 6:35 am

That may be a legend, but:
Coëmgenu wrote:
Footsteps wrote:No Chinese to verify or disqualify this on the forum?
I am not Chinese, but I can tell you that the story of Buddha and the 12 animals doesn't come from the āgamas or the Pali Canon. It could come from a regional Mahayana Sutra, but I personally doubt this story is authentic Buddhadharma, because what purpose would it serve? How is it part of the teaching? It's not bad necessarily, it just doesn't sound like Buddha's usual useful style.

Is there a tradition in Chinese sutras of Buddha teaching extensively to animals? I suspect not, but it's possible.
The Nirvana Sutra is full of astrology that may serve "no purpose" to some, FYI.

Edit: WRONG, I take that back. It's the Great Assembly Sutra/Great Collection Sutra (Moon Matrix Bodhisattva section):
Chapter Nine, “The Deva Kings’ Protection,” in the “Moon-Matrix” section of the Great Collection Sutra, fascicle six wrote:
Then, in order to instruct the beings of the world, the World-honored one asked the deva-king Mahabrahma, lord of the Saha world, “Who protects and sustains the four continents?”

The deva-king Mahabrahma, lord of the Saha world, said, ‘World-honored one of great virtue! The deva-king of Tusita heaven, together with countless hundreds of thousands of Tusita gods, protects and sustains Uttarakuru.

“The deva-king of Paranirmitavasavartin heaven, together with countless hundreds of thousands of Paranirmitavasavartin gods, protects and sustains Purvavideha.

“The deva-king of Nirmanarati heaven, together with countless hundreds of thousands of Nirmanarati gods, protects and sustains Jambudvipa.

“The deva-king of Suyama heaven, together with hundreds of thousands of Suyama gods, protects and sustains Aparagodaniya.

“World-honored one of great virtue! King Vaisravana, together with a host of countless hundreds of thousands of yaksas, protects and sustains Uttarakuru.

“King Dhrtarastra, together with a host of countless hundreds of thousands of gandharvas, protects and sustains Purvavideha.

“King Virudhaka, together with a host of countless hundreds of thousands of kumbhandas, protects and sustains Jambudvipa.

“King Virupaksa, together with a host of countless hundreds of thousands of nagas, protects and sustains Aparagodaniya.

“World-honored one of great virtue! Seven constellations of the heavenly sage [Kharosti], three luminous bodies, and three celestial maidens protect and sustain Uttarakuru. These seven constellations of the heavenly sage are Sata-bhisa, Dhanistha, and Purva-bhadrapada, Uttara-bhadraphada, Revati, Asvini, and Bharani. The three luminous bodies are Saturn, Jupiter, and Mars. The three celestial maidens are Kuhan, Mina, and Meisha.

“World-honored one of great virtue! Among these seven constellations of the heavenly sage, Sata-bhisa, Dhanistha, Purva-bhadrapada are the domain of Saturn, and Kuhan is its star. Uttara-bhadrapada and Revati are the domain of Jupiter, and Mina is its star. Asvini and Bharani are the domain of Mars, and Meisha is its star. World-honored one of great virtue, these seven constellations of Kharosti, three luminous bodies, and three celestial maidens protect and sustain Uttarakuru.

“World-honored one of great virtue! Seven constellations of the heavenly sage, three luminous bodies, and three celestial maidens protect and sustain Purvavideha. These seven constellations of the heavenly sage are Krttika, Rohini, Mrga-sira, Ardra, Punar-vasu, Pusya, and Asleka. The three luminous bodies are Venus, Jupiter, and the moon. The three celestial maidens are Birisha, Michuna, and Katsukataka.

“World-honored one of great virtue! Among these seven constellations of the heavenly sage, Krttika and Rohini are the domain of Venus, and Birisha is its star. Mrga-sira, Ardra, and Punar-vasu are the domain of Jupiter, and Michuna is its star. Pusya and Aslesa are the domain of the moon, and Katsukataka is its star. World-honored one of great virtue! These seven constellations of the heavenly sage, three luminous bodies, and three celestial maidens protect and sustain Purvavideha.
...
This is via the Kyogyoshinsho, Chapter VI, section "Divine Protection of the World through the Buddha's Benevolence" (BDK version's title). Speaking of, in the BDK version, the term "star" is translated more literally, as "astrological house".
Last edited by sillyrabbit on Sat Sep 10, 2016 6:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
Namo Amitabha Buddha
:hug:

User avatar
Coëmgenu
Posts: 1752
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:35 pm
Location: Whitby, Ontario

Re: Chinese zodiac

Post by Coëmgenu » Sat Sep 10, 2016 6:53 am

sillyrabbit wrote:That may be a legend, but:
Coëmgenu wrote:
Footsteps wrote:No Chinese to verify or disqualify this on the forum?
I am not Chinese, but I can tell you that the story of Buddha and the 12 animals doesn't come from the āgamas or the Pali Canon. It could come from a regional Mahayana Sutra, but I personally doubt this story is authentic Buddhadharma, because what purpose would it serve? How is it part of the teaching? It's not bad necessarily, it just doesn't sound like Buddha's usual useful style.

Is there a tradition in Chinese sutras of Buddha teaching extensively to animals? I suspect not, but it's possible.
The Nirvana Sutra is full of astrology that may serve "no purpose" to some, FYI.
Well then, I stand corrected.
नस्वातो नापिपरतो नद्वाभ्यां नाप्यहेतुतः उत्पन्ना जातु विद्यन्ते भावाः क्वचन केचन
There absolutely are no things, nowhere and none, that arise anew, neither out of themselves, nor out of non-self, nor out of both, nor at random.
सर्वं तथ्यं न वा तथ्यं तथ्यं चातथ्यम् एव च नैवातथ्यं नैव तथ्यम् एतद् बुद्धानुशासनम्
All is so, or all is not so, both so and not so, neither so nor not so. This is the Buddha's teaching.

一切實非實亦實亦非實
非實非非實是名諸佛法

sillyrabbit
Posts: 133
Joined: Wed Feb 24, 2016 3:47 am

Re: Chinese zodiac

Post by sillyrabbit » Sat Sep 10, 2016 6:57 am

Coëmgenu wrote:
sillyrabbit wrote:That may be a legend, but:
Coëmgenu wrote:
I am not Chinese, but I can tell you that the story of Buddha and the 12 animals doesn't come from the āgamas or the Pali Canon. It could come from a regional Mahayana Sutra, but I personally doubt this story is authentic Buddhadharma, because what purpose would it serve? How is it part of the teaching? It's not bad necessarily, it just doesn't sound like Buddha's usual useful style.

Is there a tradition in Chinese sutras of Buddha teaching extensively to animals? I suspect not, but it's possible.
The Nirvana Sutra is full of astrology that may serve "no purpose" to some, FYI.
Well then, I stand corrected.
Please see my edit.
Namo Amitabha Buddha
:hug:

Post Reply

Return to “East Asian Buddhism”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests