Hua-Yen in English

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Sentient Light
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Re: Hua-Yen in English

Post by Sentient Light » Wed Dec 20, 2017 8:53 pm

Coëmgenu wrote:
Wed Dec 20, 2017 12:53 pm

For some reason, "one-cut" means "all/sarva" in Chinese. I don't know why though. I inquired as to this in the language subforum.

For instance, afaik, 一切法空 = sarvadharmanairātmya = all dharmāḥ without self-essence
Random guess...

It probably etymologically relates to a turn-of-phrase similar to "one fell swoop". For instance, in Vietnamese, you might occasionally say a phrase like "hết không" to mean "all", but the words mean "(practically all) (nothing/zero)." Transliterated, it'd be like saying "almost zero" to say... well, the opposite. In practice, it actually translates more like, "everything with no remainder." So my gut feeling is that "one cut" comes from a similar place as like, "struck them all down with one cut", especially considering nouns are neither singular or plural in Chinese (or Vietnamese), so there's little reason to qualify it with "one" to begin with.
:buddha1: Nam mô A di đà Phật :buddha1:
:bow: Nam mô Quan Thế Âm Bồ tát :bow:
:bow: Nam mô Đại Thế Chi Bồ Tát :bow:

:buddha1: Nam mô Bổn sư Thích ca mâu ni Phật :buddha1:
:bow: Nam mô Di lặc Bồ tát :bow:
:bow: Nam mô Địa tạng vương Bồ tát :bow:

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Caoimhghín
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Re: Hua-Yen in English

Post by Caoimhghín » Wed Dec 20, 2017 8:57 pm

Sentient Light wrote:
Wed Dec 20, 2017 8:53 pm
considering nouns are neither singular or plural in Chinese (or Vietnamese), so there's little reason to qualify it with "one" to begin with.
The "one" in "one cut" comes from the "一" in "一切".
歸命本覺心法身常住妙法心蓮臺本來莊嚴三身徳三十七尊住心
城遠離因果法然具普門塵數諸三昧無邊徳海本圓滿還我頂禮心諸佛

In reverence for the root gnosis of the heart, the dharmakāya,
for the ever present good law of the heart, the lotus terrace,
for the inborn adornment of the trikāya, the thirty-seven sages dwelling in the heart,
for that which is removed from seed and fruit, the upright key to the universal gate,
for all boundless concentrations, the sea of virtue, the root perfection,
I prostrate, bowing to the hearts of all Buddhas.

胎藏金剛菩提心義略問答鈔, Treatise on the teaching of the gnostic heart of the womb and the diamond, T2397.1.470c5-8

Admin_PC
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Re: Hua-Yen in English

Post by Admin_PC » Fri Dec 22, 2017 3:58 pm

Coëmgenu wrote:
Wed Dec 20, 2017 12:53 pm
For some reason, "one-cut" means "all/sarva" in Chinese. I don't know why though. I inquired as to this in the language subforum.
I'm fairly certain that it has to do with gathering a bunch of things together in order to cut with "one cut". From there it becomes "everything" or "all". I know that sounds weird, but the second pronunciation for 切 that I quoted for you in that thread had a number of definitions that all had to do with this idea.

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Nicholas Weeks
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Re: Hua-Yen in English

Post by Nicholas Weeks » Sat May 11, 2019 7:19 pm

Bumping up this post to remind folks of the Korean HuaYan tradition which was strong, even dominant for a long time. See volumes four & five of the CWKB series.

If anyone knows of newer Avatamsaka tradition writings, let us know.
Nicholas Weeks wrote:
Sat Sep 16, 2017 8:36 pm
Collected Works of Korean Buddhism vol. 4 translation, adapted from Peter H. Lee, ed., Sourcebook of Korean Civilization (New York: Columbia University Press, 1992), 164–165. This volume four of CWKB (as is vol. five) is devoted only to Avatamsaka related texts.
The dharma nature is perfectly interfused, not possessing the characteristic of duality;
All dharmas are unmoving; they are originally quiescent.
They have no names and characteristics; all distinctions are severed.
It is known through the wisdom of realization and not by any other means.
[5] True nature is very deep and supremely fine and profound.
It is not attached to self-nature and is achieved in accordance with conditions.
Within one, there is all, and within many, there is one.
The one is precisely all, and the many are precisely the one.
A minute particle of dust contains the ten directions;
[10] All particles of dust are also like this.
The immeasurably distant kalpa is precisely a single thought-moment,
A single thought-moment is precisely an immeasurably distant kalpa.
The nine time periods and the ten time periods are mutually identical;
They are not in confusion, but have been formed separately.
[15] When one initially arouses the aspiration to enlightenment is precisely complete enlightenment.
Samsāra and nirvāna are always in harmony.
Principle and phenomena are obscure and undifferentiable
And are the sphere of the great people of the ten buddhas and Samantabhadra.
Able to enter into the ocean seal samādhi,
[20] [The Buddha’s] multitudinous production of wish fulfillment is inconceivable.
A rain of jewels that benefits living beings fills all space,
Living beings benefit according to their capacity to comprehend.
Therefore, the practitioner must return to the original source;
He cannot obtain it without ceasing from deluded thoughts.
[25] By means of unconditioned wholesome skills, he apprehends wish fulfillment,
Returns home, and obtains wealth according to his capacity.
With an inexhaustible treasure of dhāranī,
He adorns the dharma realm—a palace of real jewels.
Finally, seated on the throne of the Middle Way of Ultimate Reality,
[30] From times long past he has not moved—hence his name is
Buddha.
Glorious one, creator of all goodness, Mañjuśrī, his glorious eminence!
Manjushri-namasamgiti

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