if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

mansurhirbi87
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if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

Post by mansurhirbi87 »

I'm reading "emptiness and omnipresence" by Ziporyn. Indeed a very nice book on buddhist philosophy, but it seems present tiantai as a way where everything is relative or/and upayas. so, i ask, how harmonize with the ideia that daimoku is the expression and content of truth ?
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

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The characters Myoho-renge-kyo are Chinese. In India, the Lotus Sutra is called Saddharma-pundarīka-sūtra. The following is the mantra concerning the heart of the Lotus Sutra composed by the Tripitaka Master Shan-wu-wei:

namah samanta-buddhānām
om a ā am ah
sarva-buddha-jna-sākshebhyah
gagana-sambhavālakshani
saddharma-pundarīka-sūtra
jah hūm bam hoh vajrārakshaman
hūm svāhā

Hail to all the Buddhas! Three-bodied Thus Come Ones! Open the door to, show me, cause me to awaken to, and to enter into the wisdom and insight of all the Buddhas. You who are like space and who have freed yourself from form! Oh, Sutra of the White Lotus of the Correct Law! Cause me to enter into, to be everywhere within, to dwell in, and to rejoice in you. Oh, Adamantine Protector! Oh, empty, aspect-free, and desire-free sutra!

This mantra, which expresses the heart of the Lotus Sutra, was found in the iron tower in southern India. In this mantra, saddharma means “correct Law.” Sad means correct. Correct is the same as myō [wonderful]; myō is the same as correct. Hence the Lotus Sutra of the Correct Law and the Lotus Sutra of the Wonderful Law. And when the two characters for namu are prefixed to Myoho-renge-kyo, or the Lotus Sutra of the Wonderful Law, we have the formula Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.
-Opening of the Eyes
It was the same with Bodhisattva Never Disparaging, who lived in the Middle Day of the Law of the Buddha Awesome Sound King. He propagated widely throughout his land the teaching of twenty-four characters that begins, “I have profound reverence for you... ,” and was attacked with sticks of wood by the whole population. The twenty-four characters of Never Disparaging and the five characters of Nichiren are different in wording, but accord with the same principle. The end of the Buddha Awesome Sound King’s Middle Day and the beginning of this Latter Day of the Law are exactly the same in method of conversion. Bodhisattva Never Disparaging was a practitioner at the initial stage of rejoicing; Nichiren is an ordinary practitioner at the stage of hearing the name and words of the truth.
-On the Buddha's Prophecy

Its not that everything is relative. Rather, everything is context.

You have to look at the explanation of Hoben in the context of the Lotus Sutra, ie, what is meant by Single Vehicle. You need to temper this through understanding the Four Siddhanta, the Four Teachings, etc. Ziporyn makes reference to the Rich Man and Poor Son parable from the Adhimukti chapter of the Lotus. Its not about amorality implied by relativity. Its about the context - what does a person need at a particular moment to advance on the path toward awakening? Ekayana is clear - its about drawing beings to bodhi. How that is done depends on the circumstances. The father tells his children the house is on fire, but they ignore him. He tells them toys are outside and they come running on their own.

Hoben is just applied wisdom of dependent origination.
Those who, even with distracted minds,
Entered a stupa compound
And chanted but once, “Namo Buddhaya!”
Have certainly attained the path of the buddhas.

-Lotus Sutra, Expedient Means Chapter

There are beings with little dust in their eyes who are falling away because they do not hear the Dhamma. There will be those who will understand the Dhamma.
-Ayacana Sutta
mansurhirbi87
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

Post by mansurhirbi87 »

thank you, Q. I 'm at the beggining of the book, but i perceived it is essencial to Tiantai. Maybe the part about Ekayana will shed some light to me. I was wondering if the daimoku could be the upaya to perceive everything as upaya. Crazy, isn't it !!!
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

Post by LastLegend »

Queequeg wrote: Fri May 01, 2020 5:05 pm
The characters Myoho-renge-kyo are Chinese. In India, the Lotus Sutra is called Saddharma-pundarīka-sūtra. The following is the mantra concerning the heart of the Lotus Sutra composed by the Tripitaka Master Shan-wu-wei:

namah samanta-buddhānām
om a ā am ah
sarva-buddha-jna-sākshebhyah
gagana-sambhavālakshani
saddharma-pundarīka-sūtra
jah hūm bam hoh vajrārakshaman
hūm svāhā

Hail to all the Buddhas! Three-bodied Thus Come Ones! Open the door to, show me, cause me to awaken to, and to enter into the wisdom and insight of all the Buddhas. You who are like space and who have freed yourself from form! Oh, Sutra of the White Lotus of the Correct Law! Cause me to enter into, to be everywhere within, to dwell in, and to rejoice in you. Oh, Adamantine Protector! Oh, empty, aspect-free, and desire-free sutra!

This mantra, which expresses the heart of the Lotus Sutra, was found in the iron tower in southern India. In this mantra, saddharma means “correct Law.” Sad means correct. Correct is the same as myō [wonderful]; myō is the same as correct. Hence the Lotus Sutra of the Correct Law and the Lotus Sutra of the Wonderful Law. And when the two characters for namu are prefixed to Myoho-renge-kyo, or the Lotus Sutra of the Wonderful Law, we have the formula Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.
-Opening of the Eyes
It was the same with Bodhisattva Never Disparaging, who lived in the Middle Day of the Law of the Buddha Awesome Sound King. He propagated widely throughout his land the teaching of twenty-four characters that begins, “I have profound reverence for you... ,” and was attacked with sticks of wood by the whole population. The twenty-four characters of Never Disparaging and the five characters of Nichiren are different in wording, but accord with the same principle. The end of the Buddha Awesome Sound King’s Middle Day and the beginning of this Latter Day of the Law are exactly the same in method of conversion. Bodhisattva Never Disparaging was a practitioner at the initial stage of rejoicing; Nichiren is an ordinary practitioner at the stage of hearing the name and words of the truth.
-On the Buddha's Prophecy

Its not that everything is relative. Rather, everything is context.

You have to look at the explanation of Hoben in the context of the Lotus Sutra, ie, what is meant by Single Vehicle. You need to temper this through understanding the Four Siddhanta, the Four Teachings, etc. Ziporyn makes reference to the Rich Man and Poor Son parable from the Adhimukti chapter of the Lotus. Its not about amorality implied by relativity. Its about the context - what does a person need at a particular moment to advance on the path toward awakening? Ekayana is clear - its about drawing beings to bodhi. How that is done depends on the circumstances. The father tells his children the house is on fire, but they ignore him. He tells them toys are outside and they come running on their own.

Hoben is just applied wisdom of dependent origination.
Fine.

If the ocean has the same flavor for all (regarding Ekayana), what would that taste be? Strictly upaya!
Make personal vows.

End of the day: I don’t know.
mansurhirbi87
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

Post by mansurhirbi87 »

yeah. i read more and still cannot see as contextualization helps see daimoku the better practice for people who says that nichiren is following Tiantai. I guees the only solution is to say that he saw and propose something diferent
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

Post by tkp67 »

the components of daimoku have complex meaning if one delves into the goshos.

For example:
Within this single character kyō are contained all the sutras in the worlds throughout the ten directions. It is like the wish-granting jewel that contains within it all manner of treasures, or the vastness of space that encompasses all phenomena. And because this single character kyō of Myoho-renge-kyo is the supreme achievement of the Buddha’s lifetime of teaching, the other four characters, Myō-hō-ren-ge, likewise surpass all the other eighty thousand doctrines that the Buddha taught.

Coming now to the character myō, the Lotus Sutra says, “This sutra opens the gate of expedient means and shows the form of true reality.”19 The Great Teacher Chang-an states, “Myō means to reveal the depths of the secret storehouse.”20 The Great Teacher Miao-lo says of this, “To reveal means to open.”21 Hence the character myō means to open.


The Daimoku of the Lotus Sutra

---> https://www.nichirenlibrary.org/en/wnd-1/Content/14
mansurhirbi87
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

Post by mansurhirbi87 »

i'm refering to daimoku not only as expression but as the sole practice too
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

Post by tkp67 »

I posted this elsewhere here recently I apologize in advance if u have already seen it.
And daimoku represents the cause and condition that permits not only us but all living beings to proceed directly to the place of enlightenment.
As I understand this it means it represents the myriad of dharma
We may wonder whether, without reciting the sutra, it is possible simply through the meditation of the mind-ground9 alone to attain Buddhahood. The fact is that the meditation on three thousand realms in a single moment of life and the method of meditation known as threefold contemplation in a single mind are contained within the five characters Myoho-renge-kyo. And these five characters, Myoho-renge-kyo, are also contained within the single life of each of us. Thus T’ien-t’ai’s commentary states: “This Myoho-renge-kyo represents the depths of the secret storehouse of the original state, the enlightenment attained by the Thus Come Ones of the three existences.”10

When we chant this Myoho-renge-kyo, the Buddha of original enlightenment present in our lives becomes manifest. Our bodies and minds are comparable to the storehouse of the teachings, and the word myo is comparable to the seal [that permits the opening of the storehouse]. Thus the commentary of T’ien-t’ai states: “To reveal the depths of the secret storehouse—this is called myo, or wonderful. To define the proper relationship between the provisional and the true—this is termed ho, or the Law. To point to the original enlightenment attained by the Buddha in the far distant past—this is compared to ren, or lotus. To clarify the perfect way of the p.86non-duality of provisional and true—this is compared to ge, or blossom. The voice carries out the work of the Buddha, and this is called kyo, or sutra.”11

And the commentary also states: “Myo is a term used to praise the Law that is beyond ordinary comprehension. Myo is also the Law of the Ten Worlds and the ten factors, the Law that is both provisional and true.”12

Chanting the daimoku, or title, of the Lotus Sutra is the same as carrying out meditation. Ignorant persons may find this difficult to believe. But the second volume of Great Concentration and Insight by T’ien-t’ai has a passage “regarding recitation and silence” in which the word “recitation” refers to recitation of the Lotus Sutra and “silence” to the practice of meditation or contemplation. And again, in the first volume of his Meaning of the Four Teachings, T’ien-t’ai states: “Not only [are such practices as recitation] not a needless waste of effort, they are essential in enabling one to grasp the principle involved.”
As I understand it If one where to scour the goshos for all of the descriptive terms used that define the attributes of myoho renge kyo the meaning will still "unfold" according to cause, condition and capacity of the chanter/reader.

It is ultimately an economy of efforts that allows for the mind to hold and express all of Shakyamuni's enlightenment and subsequent teachings including cause AND effect, over term and across the populous because this is what the sutra represents and the daimoku represents.[/quote]

---> https://www.nichirenlibrary.org/en/wnd-2/Content/180

The Doctrine of Three Thousand Realms in a Single Moment of Life
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

Post by Queequeg »

mansurhirbi87 wrote: Fri May 01, 2020 9:54 pm yeah. i read more and still cannot see as contextualization helps see daimoku the better practice for people who says that nichiren is following Tiantai. I guees the only solution is to say that he saw and propose something diferent
Nichiren did not strictly follow Tiantai.

There's a teaching in Tiantai - Opening the Provisional to Reveal the Real. This refers to Shakyamuni revealing his eternal life span, and implicitly, his Essential Teaching. The Buddha explains that all the teachings he has expounded are intended to prepare people to hear his essential teaching, and that has been his intent all along. When he was teaching Hinayana and Provisional Mahayana, he was setting everyone up to hear about his Life Span. Without that setup, the explanation goes, people would not understand the full import of the Buddha's life span and would take it for granted. Once the Essential is revealed to the fully prepared listener, they understand the profundity of the Buddha's lifespan. Zhiyi described this as the lotus flower dropping its petals to reveal the seed pod.

In Tiantai and Tendai, this teaching is interpreted to expansively embrace the immeasurable upaya. Nichiren, however, interpreted this to say, once the Essential is revealed, there is no need for the immeasurable upaya.

Nichiren identified the title of the Lotus Sutra as its essence. This is not particularly novel. One of Zhiyi's great works, the Profound Meaning of the Lotus Sutra, does this - the entire text is analyzed in terms of its title, and its demonstrated that the entire meaning is distilled into the title. Nichiren took this as the seed pod, so to speak, concluding that nothing else is necessary.

There is another aspect to this - that's the Mappo aspect. According to Nichiren's interpretation of the Lotus, the Essential Teaching is not intended to be spread in the Former and Middle days, but only in the degenerate age when the Buddha's teachings are on the verge of being lost. This period was believed to have started in 1052 CE, or 2000 years after the Buddha's parinirvana.

The provisional teachings were widely believed in Japan to have lost all efficacy, and so it was imperative to find alternatives. Honen proposed exclusive practice of the Nembutsu to aspire to rebirth in Sukhavati. Nichiren rejected this other-worldly orientation and instead identified the Daimoku as the expression of the Essential Teaching to be spread in Mappo.

In Mappo, it is almost impossible to attain bodhi through the various provisional teachings. Not because the teachings have necessarily lost efficacy, but really because the people born in Mappo are not karmically capable of benefiting from these teachings. The people who appear in Mappo have such tenuous connection to the Buddha, or even none at all. As such, they are at a very remedial stage of spiritual development - they need the seed of Buddhahood planted in their minds. Most are not in a position to cultivate this seed, but, by embracing the Daimoku, they are bound to encounter buddhas in future existences and never be separated from the Buddha.

Then there is the whole immediacy of Buddhahood - Once one enters the stream of Buddhahood, its a matter of perfecting what is already there.

If it sounds like there are two different views here, that's correct. One is the logic of the relative. The other is the Absolute - the direct awakening through the blessing of the Buddha. Both are the case - and this is understood through the Three Truths.

I'm sorry that's probably a mixed up and scattered explanation.

The thing with the Lotus teachings is, you need to take the entire teaching in at once. It doesn't really help to just have a glimpse of this part, and that part individually.

Its the same with the story of the Rich Man and Poor Son. Only the Rich Man (the Buddha) understands the whole situation. The Poor Man, only knows what his limited experience allows. Its only after the Poor Man has been nurtured by the Rich Man that he is able to comprehend the full reality of the situation.

Anyways, according to Nichiren, one needs to stick with the Daimoku even when it doesn't make sense. It will eventually come together, but there is no alternative to going through the process of upaya... Daimoku is like a lifeline that keeps one close to the Buddhadharma. Nichiren actually compares it to a charm tied around our necks - so no matter how stupid or irresponsible we are, the Daimoku - one's connection to the Buddha - is never lost. Kind of like a tag on a dog's neck.

I suppose Nichiren's response to your question would be - all that theory is well and good, but you're in the spin cycle of samsara, and asking about all this is like asking who shot you in the eye with a poisoned arrow. To tie this to the Lotus, the Daimoku is the medicine the doctor leaves for his children saying, "Take this medicine and don't worry that it won't cure you."
Those who, even with distracted minds,
Entered a stupa compound
And chanted but once, “Namo Buddhaya!”
Have certainly attained the path of the buddhas.

-Lotus Sutra, Expedient Means Chapter

There are beings with little dust in their eyes who are falling away because they do not hear the Dhamma. There will be those who will understand the Dhamma.
-Ayacana Sutta
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

Post by tkp67 »

What an excellent post QQ :anjali:
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

Post by markatex »

Queequeg wrote: Sat May 02, 2020 3:01 am In Tiantai and Tendai, this teaching is interpreted to expansively embrace the immeasurable upaya. Nichiren, however, interpreted this to say, once the Essential is revealed, there is no need for the immeasurable upaya.
I think this is the point where Nichiren and Tendai diverge. It's an important difference.
In Mappo, it is almost impossible to attain bodhi through the various provisional teachings. Not because the teachings have necessarily lost efficacy, but really because the people born in Mappo are not karmically capable of benefiting from these teachings. The people who appear in Mappo have such tenuous connection to the Buddha, or even none at all. As such, they are at a very remedial stage of spiritual development - they need the seed of Buddhahood planted in their minds. Most are not in a position to cultivate this seed, but, by embracing the Daimoku, they are bound to encounter buddhas in future existences and never be separated from the Buddha.
This relates to something that's been rattling around in my head. It's often said that chanting the Daimoku allows one to attain Buddhahood in our present lives. Then there's the image of the lotus flower containing both seed and blossom at the same time as a metaphor for the Daimoku. Is Nichiren saying essentially that we do in fact attain Buddhahood in our present lives, even though we really don't? And does this tie in to the fact that the Tendai (and, by extension, Nichiren) tradition is rooted in Madhyamaka philosophy? If I had more patience, I could put that all together in a paragraph or two.
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

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markatex wrote: Sun May 03, 2020 1:12 am This relates to something that's been rattling around in my head. It's often said that chanting the Daimoku allows one to attain Buddhahood in our present lives. Then there's the image of the lotus flower containing both seed and blossom at the same time as a metaphor for the Daimoku. Is Nichiren saying essentially that we do in fact attain Buddhahood in our present lives, even though we really don't? And does this tie in to the fact that the Tendai (and, by extension, Nichiren) tradition is rooted in Madhyamaka philosophy? If I had more patience, I could put that all together in a paragraph or two.
I don't know the answer either. The only thing that makes sense to me though, is the example Zhiyi sites in his description of the Six Stages that I believe is taken from the Ta Chi Tu Lun, but I think can be found in other sources -

When a torch is lit and burns through the night, is the flame when first lit different or the same as in the morning? Once the seed of bodhi is received, its like the torch being lit. Is that the same flame as when bodhi is perfected?
Those who, even with distracted minds,
Entered a stupa compound
And chanted but once, “Namo Buddhaya!”
Have certainly attained the path of the buddhas.

-Lotus Sutra, Expedient Means Chapter

There are beings with little dust in their eyes who are falling away because they do not hear the Dhamma. There will be those who will understand the Dhamma.
-Ayacana Sutta
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

Post by LastLegend »

markatex wrote: Sun May 03, 2020 1:12 am
Queequeg wrote: Sat May 02, 2020 3:01 am In Tiantai and Tendai, this teaching is interpreted to expansively embrace the immeasurable upaya. Nichiren, however, interpreted this to say, once the Essential is revealed, there is no need for the immeasurable upaya.
I think this is the point where Nichiren and Tendai diverge. It's an important difference.
In Mappo, it is almost impossible to attain bodhi through the various provisional teachings. Not because the teachings have necessarily lost efficacy, but really because the people born in Mappo are not karmically capable of benefiting from these teachings. The people who appear in Mappo have such tenuous connection to the Buddha, or even none at all. As such, they are at a very remedial stage of spiritual development - they need the seed of Buddhahood planted in their minds. Most are not in a position to cultivate this seed, but, by embracing the Daimoku, they are bound to encounter buddhas in future existences and never be separated from the Buddha.
This relates to something that's been rattling around in my head. It's often said that chanting the Daimoku allows one to attain Buddhahood in our present lives. Then there's the image of the lotus flower containing both seed and blossom at the same time as a metaphor for the Daimoku. Is Nichiren saying essentially that we do in fact attain Buddhahood in our present lives, even though we really don't? And does this tie in to the fact that the Tendai (and, by extension, Nichiren) tradition is rooted in Madhyamaka philosophy? If I had more patience, I could put that all together in a paragraph or two.
That depends on interpretation of Nichiren what Buddhahood is?
Make personal vows.

End of the day: I don’t know.
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

Post by tkp67 »

The ten realms are foundational in both traditions.
Buddhahood [仏界] ( bukkai): The state of awakening that a Buddha has attained. The ultimate goal of Buddhist practice and the highest of the Ten Worlds. The word enlightenment is often used synonymously with Buddhahood. Buddhahood is regarded as a state of perfect freedom, in which one is awakened to the eternal and ultimate truth that is the reality of all things. This supreme state of life is characterized by boundless wisdom and infinite compassion. The Lotus Sutra reveals that Buddhahood is a potential in the lives of all beings. See also attainment of Buddhahood.

mutual possession of the Ten Worlds [十界互具] ( jikkai-gogu): A principle formulated by T’ien-t’ai (538–597) on the basis of the Lotus Sutra stating that each of the Ten Worlds possesses the potential for all ten within itself. One of the component principles of T’ien-t’ai’s doctrine of three thousand realms in a single moment of life. “Mutual possession” means that life is not fixed in one or another of the Ten Worlds, but can manifest any of the ten, from hell to the state of Buddhahood, at any given moment. While one of the ten is manifest, the other nine remain latent, in the state of non-substantiality. The important point of this principle is that all beings in any of the nine worlds possess the Buddha nature. This means that every person has the potential to manifest Buddhahood, while a Buddha also possesses the nine worlds and in this sense is not separate or different from ordinary people.
From another viewpoint, the mutual possession of the Ten Worlds can be seen as indicating “the world of Buddhahood inherent in the nine worlds,” or “inclusion of Buddhahood in the nine worlds,” and “the nine worlds inherent in Buddhahood,” or “inclusion of the nine worlds in Buddhahood.” In his treatise The Object of Devotion for Observing the Mind, Nichiren (1222–1282) writes: “The ‘Expedient Means’ chapter in volume one of the Lotus Sutra states, ‘The Buddhas wish to open the door of Buddha wisdom to all living beings.’ This refers to the world of Buddhahood inherent in the nine worlds. The ‘Life Span’ chapter states: ‘Thus, since I attained Buddhahood, an extremely long period of time has passed. My life span is an immeasurable number of asamkhya kalpas, and during that time I have constantly abided here without entering extinction. Good men, originally I practiced the bodhisattva way, and the life span that I acquired then has yet to come to an end but will last twice the number of years that have already passed.’ Here the sutra refers to the nine worlds inherent in Buddhahood” (356–57).
three thousand realms in a single moment of life [一念三千] ( ichinen-sanzen): Also, the principle of a single moment of life comprising three thousand realms. “A single moment of life” (ichinen) is also translated as one mind, one thought, or one thought-moment. A philosophical system established by T’ien-t’ai (538–597) in his Great Concentration and Insight on the basis of the phrase “the true aspect of all phenomena” from the “Expedient Means” (second) chapter of the Lotus Sutra. The three thousand realms, or the entire phenomenal world, exist in a single moment of life. The number three thousand here comes from the following calculation: 10 (Ten Worlds) × 10 (Ten Worlds) × 10 (ten factors) × 3 (three realms of existence). Life at any moment manifests one of the Ten Worlds. Each of these worlds possesses the potential for all ten within itself, and this “mutual possession,” or mutual inclusion, of the Ten Worlds is represented as 102, or a hundred, possible worlds. Each of these hundred worlds possesses the ten factors, making one thousand factors or potentials, and these operate within each of the three realms of existence, thus making three thousand realms.
The theoretical teaching (first half) of the Lotus Sutra expounds the ten factors of life. It also sets forth the attainment of Buddhahood by persons of the two vehicles (voice-hearers and cause-awakened ones), which signifies the mutual possession of the Ten Worlds. The essential teaching (latter half) of the sutra reveals the true cause (the eternal nine worlds), the true effect (eternal Buddhahood), and the true land (the eternal land or realm of the environment). T’ien-t’ai unified all these concepts in one system, three thousand realms in a single moment of life.
Volume five of Great Concentration and Insight reads: “Life at each moment is endowed with the Ten Worlds. At the same time, each of the Ten Worlds is endowed with all Ten Worlds, so that an entity of life actually possesses one hundred worlds. Each of these worlds in turn possesses thirty realms, which means that in the one hundred worlds there are three thousand realms. The three thousand realms of existence are all possessed by life in a single moment. If there is no life, that is the end of the matter. But if there is the slightest bit of life, it contains all the three thousand realms. . . . This is what we mean when we speak of the ‘region of the unfathomable.’”
“Life at each moment” means life as an indivisible whole that includes body and mind, cause and effect, and sentient and insentient things. A single moment of life is endowed, as stated above, with the three thousand realms. The relationship of these two elements is not such that one precedes the other, or that they are simultaneous in the sense that one is included in the other. Actually they are non-dual or, as T’ien-t’ai put it, “two [in phenomena] but not two [in essence].” The provisional teachings stated that all phenomena arise from the mind, or that they are subordinate to the mind. The Lotus Sutra clarifies that the true aspect is inseparable from all phenomena, and that all phenomena, just as they are, are in themselves the true aspect. When T’ien-t’ai stated, “The three thousand realms of existence are all possessed by life in a single moment. . . . But if there is the slightest bit of life, it contains all the three thousand realms,” he is referring to the non-duality of “a single moment of life” and the “three thousand realms.”
“The three thousand realms in a single moment of life” is classified into two as the theoretical principle and the actual embodiment of this principle. These are respectively termed the theoretical three thousand realms in a single moment of life and the actual three thousand realms in a single moment of life. The theoretical principle is based on the theoretical teaching of the Lotus Sutra, which expounds the equality of Buddhahood and the nine worlds. Both, it points out, are manifestations of the true aspect. The theoretical teaching also reveals the mutual possession of the Ten Worlds based on the principle that persons of the two vehicles, who were denied Buddhahood in the provisional teachings, also possess innate Buddhahood and can attain it. Strictly speaking, however, the theoretical teaching reveals only the hundred worlds and, multiplying by the ten factors of life, the thousand factors, and does not reveal their eternal nature. Only when supported by the essential teaching (the latter half) of the Lotus Sutra, can the theoretical teaching be said to expound theoretically, as a possibility, the three thousand realms in a single moment of life.
On the other hand, the essential teaching reveals Shakyamuni’s enlightenment in the remote past (the true effect, eternal Buddhahood), the eternal life of his disciples, the Bodhisattvas of the Earth (the true cause, the eternal nine worlds), and the eternity of the sahā world (the true land). These explain the eternal Ten Worlds and the eternal three realms of existence, and thus “the actual three thousand realms in a single moment of life.”
Despite its comprehensive view, the essential teaching does not go on to reveal the practice that enables one to embody directly this principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life. Though the sutra says, “If there are those who hear the Law, then not a one will fail to attain Buddhahood,” it does not identify what the Law is. That is why Nichiren (1222–1282) defined the entire Lotus Sutra—both the theoretical and the essential teachings—as representing “the theoretical three thousand realms in a single moment of life.”
In contrast, Nichiren embodied his life embracing the three thousand realms in a single moment, or the life of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, in the mandala known as the Gohonzon and established the practice for attaining Buddhahood. That practice is to chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo with faith in the Gohonzon. In Nichiren’s teaching, this is the practice for “observing the mind,” i.e., observing one’s own mind and seeing Buddhahood in it. For this reason, his teaching is summarized in the phrase “embracing the Gohonzon is in itself observing one’s mind” or “embracing the Gohonzon is in itself attaining Buddhahood.”
He states in a 1273 letter known as Reply to Kyō’ō, “I, Nichiren, have inscribed my life in sumi ink, so believe in the Gohonzon with your whole heart. The Buddha’s will is the Lotus Sutra, but the soul of Nichiren is nothing other than Nam-myoho-renge-kyo” (412), and in his 1273 treatise The Object of Devotion for Observing the Mind: “Showing profound compassion for those unable to comprehend the gem of the doctrine of three thousand realms in a single moment of life, the Buddha wrapped it within the five characters [of Myoho-renge-kyo], with which he then adorned the necks of the ignorant people of the latter age” (376).
Nichikan (1665–1726), the twenty-sixth chief priest of Taiseki-ji temple, interpreted the above passage of volume five of Great Concentration and Insight from the viewpoint of Nichiren’s teaching. Nichikan defined “life at each moment” as the life of the eternal Buddha, or Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, which is inscribed down the center of the Gohonzon; he further interpreted “endowed with the Ten Worlds” as the Buddhas, bodhisattvas, and other figures inscribed on both sides of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo in the Gohonzon. These represent the principles of the mutual possession of the Ten Worlds, the hundred worlds and the thousand factors, and the three thousand realms. According to Nichikan, the sentence “The three thousand realms of existence are all possessed by life in a single moment” refers to the “region of the unfathomable,” which he interprets as the object of devotion that embodies the principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life. This is not to be viewed simply as an external object but as something that exists in the life of a person with faith in the object of devotion. Without faith, the object of devotion endowed with the three thousand realms does not exist within one’s life. This, Nichikan stated, is the ultimate meaning of T’ien-t’ai’s doctrine.
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

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tkp67 wrote: Sun May 03, 2020 4:53 am The ten realms are foundational in both traditions.
Buddhahood [仏界] ( bukkai): The state of awakening that a Buddha has attained. The ultimate goal of Buddhist practice and the highest of the Ten Worlds. The word enlightenment is often used synonymously with Buddhahood. Buddhahood is regarded as a state of perfect freedom, in which one is awakened to the eternal and ultimate truth that is the reality of all things. This supreme state of life is characterized by boundless wisdom and infinite compassion. The Lotus Sutra reveals that Buddhahood is a potential in the lives of all beings. See also attainment of Buddhahood.

mutual possession of the Ten Worlds [十界互具] ( jikkai-gogu): A principle formulated by T’ien-t’ai (538–597) on the basis of the Lotus Sutra stating that each of the Ten Worlds possesses the potential for all ten within itself. One of the component principles of T’ien-t’ai’s doctrine of three thousand realms in a single moment of life. “Mutual possession” means that life is not fixed in one or another of the Ten Worlds, but can manifest any of the ten, from hell to the state of Buddhahood, at any given moment. While one of the ten is manifest, the other nine remain latent, in the state of non-substantiality. The important point of this principle is that all beings in any of the nine worlds possess the Buddha nature. This means that every person has the potential to manifest Buddhahood, while a Buddha also possesses the nine worlds and in this sense is not separate or different from ordinary people.
From another viewpoint, the mutual possession of the Ten Worlds can be seen as indicating “the world of Buddhahood inherent in the nine worlds,” or “inclusion of Buddhahood in the nine worlds,” and “the nine worlds inherent in Buddhahood,” or “inclusion of the nine worlds in Buddhahood.” In his treatise The Object of Devotion for Observing the Mind, Nichiren (1222–1282) writes: “The ‘Expedient Means’ chapter in volume one of the Lotus Sutra states, ‘The Buddhas wish to open the door of Buddha wisdom to all living beings.’ This refers to the world of Buddhahood inherent in the nine worlds. The ‘Life Span’ chapter states: ‘Thus, since I attained Buddhahood, an extremely long period of time has passed. My life span is an immeasurable number of asamkhya kalpas, and during that time I have constantly abided here without entering extinction. Good men, originally I practiced the bodhisattva way, and the life span that I acquired then has yet to come to an end but will last twice the number of years that have already passed.’ Here the sutra refers to the nine worlds inherent in Buddhahood” (356–57).
three thousand realms in a single moment of life [一念三千] ( ichinen-sanzen): Also, the principle of a single moment of life comprising three thousand realms. “A single moment of life” (ichinen) is also translated as one mind, one thought, or one thought-moment. A philosophical system established by T’ien-t’ai (538–597) in his Great Concentration and Insight on the basis of the phrase “the true aspect of all phenomena” from the “Expedient Means” (second) chapter of the Lotus Sutra. The three thousand realms, or the entire phenomenal world, exist in a single moment of life. The number three thousand here comes from the following calculation: 10 (Ten Worlds) × 10 (Ten Worlds) × 10 (ten factors) × 3 (three realms of existence). Life at any moment manifests one of the Ten Worlds. Each of these worlds possesses the potential for all ten within itself, and this “mutual possession,” or mutual inclusion, of the Ten Worlds is represented as 102, or a hundred, possible worlds. Each of these hundred worlds possesses the ten factors, making one thousand factors or potentials, and these operate within each of the three realms of existence, thus making three thousand realms.
The theoretical teaching (first half) of the Lotus Sutra expounds the ten factors of life. It also sets forth the attainment of Buddhahood by persons of the two vehicles (voice-hearers and cause-awakened ones), which signifies the mutual possession of the Ten Worlds. The essential teaching (latter half) of the sutra reveals the true cause (the eternal nine worlds), the true effect (eternal Buddhahood), and the true land (the eternal land or realm of the environment). T’ien-t’ai unified all these concepts in one system, three thousand realms in a single moment of life.
Volume five of Great Concentration and Insight reads: “Life at each moment is endowed with the Ten Worlds. At the same time, each of the Ten Worlds is endowed with all Ten Worlds, so that an entity of life actually possesses one hundred worlds. Each of these worlds in turn possesses thirty realms, which means that in the one hundred worlds there are three thousand realms. The three thousand realms of existence are all possessed by life in a single moment. If there is no life, that is the end of the matter. But if there is the slightest bit of life, it contains all the three thousand realms. . . . This is what we mean when we speak of the ‘region of the unfathomable.’”
“Life at each moment” means life as an indivisible whole that includes body and mind, cause and effect, and sentient and insentient things. A single moment of life is endowed, as stated above, with the three thousand realms. The relationship of these two elements is not such that one precedes the other, or that they are simultaneous in the sense that one is included in the other. Actually they are non-dual or, as T’ien-t’ai put it, “two [in phenomena] but not two [in essence].” The provisional teachings stated that all phenomena arise from the mind, or that they are subordinate to the mind. The Lotus Sutra clarifies that the true aspect is inseparable from all phenomena, and that all phenomena, just as they are, are in themselves the true aspect. When T’ien-t’ai stated, “The three thousand realms of existence are all possessed by life in a single moment. . . . But if there is the slightest bit of life, it contains all the three thousand realms,” he is referring to the non-duality of “a single moment of life” and the “three thousand realms.”
“The three thousand realms in a single moment of life” is classified into two as the theoretical principle and the actual embodiment of this principle. These are respectively termed the theoretical three thousand realms in a single moment of life and the actual three thousand realms in a single moment of life. The theoretical principle is based on the theoretical teaching of the Lotus Sutra, which expounds the equality of Buddhahood and the nine worlds. Both, it points out, are manifestations of the true aspect. The theoretical teaching also reveals the mutual possession of the Ten Worlds based on the principle that persons of the two vehicles, who were denied Buddhahood in the provisional teachings, also possess innate Buddhahood and can attain it. Strictly speaking, however, the theoretical teaching reveals only the hundred worlds and, multiplying by the ten factors of life, the thousand factors, and does not reveal their eternal nature. Only when supported by the essential teaching (the latter half) of the Lotus Sutra, can the theoretical teaching be said to expound theoretically, as a possibility, the three thousand realms in a single moment of life.
On the other hand, the essential teaching reveals Shakyamuni’s enlightenment in the remote past (the true effect, eternal Buddhahood), the eternal life of his disciples, the Bodhisattvas of the Earth (the true cause, the eternal nine worlds), and the eternity of the sahā world (the true land). These explain the eternal Ten Worlds and the eternal three realms of existence, and thus “the actual three thousand realms in a single moment of life.”
Despite its comprehensive view, the essential teaching does not go on to reveal the practice that enables one to embody directly this principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life. Though the sutra says, “If there are those who hear the Law, then not a one will fail to attain Buddhahood,” it does not identify what the Law is. That is why Nichiren (1222–1282) defined the entire Lotus Sutra—both the theoretical and the essential teachings—as representing “the theoretical three thousand realms in a single moment of life.”
In contrast, Nichiren embodied his life embracing the three thousand realms in a single moment, or the life of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, in the mandala known as the Gohonzon and established the practice for attaining Buddhahood. That practice is to chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo with faith in the Gohonzon. In Nichiren’s teaching, this is the practice for “observing the mind,” i.e., observing one’s own mind and seeing Buddhahood in it. For this reason, his teaching is summarized in the phrase “embracing the Gohonzon is in itself observing one’s mind” or “embracing the Gohonzon is in itself attaining Buddhahood.”
He states in a 1273 letter known as Reply to Kyō’ō, “I, Nichiren, have inscribed my life in sumi ink, so believe in the Gohonzon with your whole heart. The Buddha’s will is the Lotus Sutra, but the soul of Nichiren is nothing other than Nam-myoho-renge-kyo” (412), and in his 1273 treatise The Object of Devotion for Observing the Mind: “Showing profound compassion for those unable to comprehend the gem of the doctrine of three thousand realms in a single moment of life, the Buddha wrapped it within the five characters [of Myoho-renge-kyo], with which he then adorned the necks of the ignorant people of the latter age” (376).
Nichikan (1665–1726), the twenty-sixth chief priest of Taiseki-ji temple, interpreted the above passage of volume five of Great Concentration and Insight from the viewpoint of Nichiren’s teaching. Nichikan defined “life at each moment” as the life of the eternal Buddha, or Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, which is inscribed down the center of the Gohonzon; he further interpreted “endowed with the Ten Worlds” as the Buddhas, bodhisattvas, and other figures inscribed on both sides of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo in the Gohonzon. These represent the principles of the mutual possession of the Ten Worlds, the hundred worlds and the thousand factors, and the three thousand realms. According to Nichikan, the sentence “The three thousand realms of existence are all possessed by life in a single moment” refers to the “region of the unfathomable,” which he interprets as the object of devotion that embodies the principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life. This is not to be viewed simply as an external object but as something that exists in the life of a person with faith in the object of devotion. Without faith, the object of devotion endowed with the three thousand realms does not exist within one’s life. This, Nichikan stated, is the ultimate meaning of T’ien-t’ai’s doctrine.
I get the iron faith and the description (which I don’t think is not limited to one particular Buddha of their awakening) and the established practice. However, there are stages that we have to go through before becoming a complete Buddha. Let’s say a 10th blumi (or whatever has completely transcended samsara or Nirvana) has fully awakened (but not the level of Buddha). He might be able to know what’s on your mind from across the globe and might need to shut down that functioning because too much suffering that he hears only past Bodhisattvas such as Avalokitesvara are able to stand hearing the suffering of sentient beings. He won’t be able to walk through wall! The point is because of too much confusion and delusion we all have to deal with, what type of mind is a Bodhisattva (who transcended samsara and nirvana) and how do we know if we are almost there or getting closer to transcending samsara and Nirvana? No, I don’t know Buddha’s enlightenment or wisdom nor I think about it. I think I only know what’s applicable to where I am.
Make personal vows.

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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

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The so called inexpressible, non-dual, or inconceivable is referring to that wisdom of Bodhisattvas and Buddhas just that we are being covered by delusion.
Make personal vows.

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tkp67
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

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LastLegend wrote: Sun May 03, 2020 6:58 am The so called inexpressible, non-dual, or inconceivable is referring to that wisdom of Bodhisattvas and Buddhas just that we are being covered by delusion.
Does reducing it to such simplistic meaning offer liberation from the delusion one is covered in?
tkp67
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

Post by tkp67 »

LastLegend wrote: Sun May 03, 2020 6:10 am
I get the iron faith and the description (which I don’t think is not limited to one particular Buddha of their awakening) and the established practice. However, there are stages that we have to go through before becoming a complete Buddha. Let’s say a 10th blumi (or whatever has completely transcended samsara or Nirvana) has fully awakened (but not the level of Buddha). He might be able to know what’s on your mind from across the globe and might need to shut down that functioning because too much suffering that he hears only past Bodhisattvas such as Avalokitesvara are able to stand hearing the suffering of sentient beings. He won’t be able to walk through wall! The point is because of too much confusion and delusion we all have to deal with, what type of mind is a Bodhisattva (who transcended samsara and nirvana) and how do we know if we are almost there or getting closer to transcending samsara and Nirvana? No, I don’t know Buddha’s enlightenment or wisdom nor I think about it. I think I only know what’s applicable to where I am.
First, Nichiren does discuss stages of development and points to particular sources. This would lead me to believe that he expected people to develop relative to their causes, conditions and capacities.

Second, the teaching is open. This means as one practices their own causes, capacities and conditions drive their practice to the depth required. I believe Nichiren designed the teaching this way as a means to express pure equanimity.

There is no definitive level of development because the myriad variations due to relevance and relativity in regards to causes, capacities and conditions.

Third,we take up the mantle of Shayamuni fashioned for us by Nichiren and we take it for the whole of our existence without falter. There is no differentiation past this. As I understand it, if it did it would lack equanimity.

If one does develop in stages the only metrics that matter are how those developments facilitate repaying one's debt to the buddha of the ten directions and three times.

Faith is the Lotus Sutra requires complete commitment for the sake of all sentient beings regardless of cost to one's self. Look to the price paid for some of those in attendance.

:anjali:
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

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On sudden(immediate) and perfect ...
When Shakyamuni Buddha was preparing to transmit this document handed down from the Buddhas of the three existences, he patted the heads of the numerous bodhisattvas who had filled the air above three thousand three hundred ten thousand million nayutas of lands, and then, indicating the time he had in mind, he exhorted them to expound this Law specifically for the sake of us today, the living beings of this Latter Day of the Law, and to use the above document of the Buddha and bestow the Law without fail upon us. Three times he spoke, carefully repeating the same words over. And when he had done so, the numerous bodhisattvas all without exception bent their bodies, bowed their heads and, repeating the same words three times over, each promised without fail to honor the Buddha’s instructions. With this the Buddha, his mind now at ease, returned to his royal city of original enlightenment.

Following the ceremony of preaching the Law of the Buddhas of the three existences and their manner of setting forth the Law, this transfer document indicates in the same words the period to which the Law should be transmitted, the Latter Day of the Law. That is, it is indicated that in the last five-hundred-year period this Lotus Sutra of the Wonderful Law should be the sole means for attaining Buddhahood. This is clearly indicated in this document that was handed down from the Buddhas of the three existences.

The “Peaceful Practices” chapter of the Lotus Sutra has described how, after the world has entered the Latter Day of the Law, ordinary people who have just set their minds on the attainment of the way can, by practicing the Lotus Sutra, gain Buddhahood. That is, by carrying out three types of activities for their own benefit, namely, peaceful practices of the body, peaceful practices of the mouth, and peaceful practices of the mind, and by carrying out practices intended for the conversion of others, peaceful practices based on the vow of compassion—doing so, as the chapter says, “in the latter age hereafter, when the Law is about to perish.”

The reference here is to the present time. In the “Peaceful Practices” chapter just cited, there are four passages that refer to the latter age. In the “Medicine King” chapter, there are two such passages, and in the “Encouragements” chapter, the latter age is three times referred to.

All these passages refer to our present age and represent instructions handed down from the Buddha. But now if one fails to heed the correct instructions contained in these passages and instead follows the words of some ordinary person or gives way to one’s own ignorant mind, turning one’s back on the declaration handed down from the Buddhas of the three existences and spurning for all time the Law of the Buddhas, what regret, what distress of mind, what pity and grief one will p.852inflict upon the Buddhas of the three existences!

The Nirvana Sutra says, “Rely on the Law and not upon persons.” How deplorable, how pitiful, that scholars of this latter age, believing that they are studying and applying the Law of the Buddha, should on the contrary bring about the destruction of that Law!

On “Great Concentration and Insight” expresses grief over this fact when it says: “The reason that people hear of this teaching of perfect and immediate enlightenment but fail to respect it is that in recent times there is much confusion and misunderstanding among those who practice the Mahayana doctrines. And the situation is even worse because in the Middle and Latter Days of the Law people have little feeling and little faith. Though the teaching of perfect and immediate enlightenment may overflow the storehouses and its scrolls more than fill the sutra boxes, people give it not a moment’s consideration but rather turn away with closed eyes. How painful it is to think of them, being born in vain, dying in vain!”

And in volume four of the same work we read: “The teaching of perfect and immediate enlightenment was from the beginning directed at ordinary people. If it was not intended to bring benefit to ordinary people, then why, instead of electing to dwell in a land where the essential nature of phenomena is manifest and, with a body marked by that essential nature, expounding this teaching of perfect and immediate enlightenment to the various bodhisattvas there, did the Buddha, for the sake of bodhisattvas who have just begun to manifest the essential nature of phenomena, take on the body of an ordinary person and make his advent in this threefold world? . . . He did so to show that the one mind of the Buddha nature is present within ordinary people and therefore can be cultivated by religious practice.”

In effect, then, we may say that when one comes to see that one’s own mind is one with the body of the Buddha, then one quickly attains the state of Buddhahood.


Hence On “Great Concentration and Insight” says, “Because all the various Buddhas have come to see that their own minds are no different from the Buddha mind, they have therefore been able to attain Buddhahood.”

This is what is known as observation of the mind. When one truly awakens to the fact that one’s own mind and the Buddha mind are in fact one mind, then no evil karma can obstruct one when one’s life comes to a close, and there will be no more deluded thoughts to detain one in the realm of birth and death.

When one understands that all phenomena whatsoever are manifestations of the Buddhist Law, then one does not need any “good friends” to teach and instruct one. One thinks as one thinks, speaks as one speaks, acts as one acts, behaves as one behaves, and all one’s four types of activity, walking, standing, sitting, lying down, all that one does, is one with and in harmonious accord with the mind of the Buddha. One becomes a person who can act freely, without error or obstacle. This is what is known as practice based on the Buddha’s teaching that pertains to enlightenment.

If one should discard this freely exercised practice and instead allow one’s mind to dwell in a state of distorted thinking marked by ignorance and delusion, thoughts without substance, turning one’s back on the teaching and instruction handed down from the Buddhas of the three existences, then for all time one will merely move from darkness into darkness, always, alas, alas, at variance with the Law of the Buddha!

But now if one will only cast aside p.853such thinking, correct one’s outlook, and return to a state of enlightenment, then one will realize that the attainment of Buddhahood in one’s present form is to be found nowhere outside one’s own body. The mirror that is one’s own mind is none other than the same mirror that is the mirror of the Buddha’s mind. But we are looking at the back side of the mirror, and therefore we cannot see the truth or principle that underlies our nature, and so we are said to be in a state of ignorance. The Thus Come One, however, looks at the front side of the mirror and can see and understand the principle underlying our nature. For this reason, enlightenment and ignorance may be said to constitute a single entity.

The mirror is a single mirror, but depending upon whether one is looking at the front or the back of it, the distinction between enlightenment and darkness arises. The fact that the mirror has a back side does not constitute any interference to the front side, but, depending upon which side of the mirror one is viewing, the distinction between enlightenment and darkness is produced. This is known as the identity or the fusing and penetrating of two aspects of a single phenomenon.

The doctrines intended for the instruction and conversion of others are comparable to the back side of the mirror, while the observation of the mind that marks the teaching that pertains to the Buddha’s enlightenment is comparable to the front side of the mirror. But the mirror representative of the time when one is practicing the doctrines intended for the instruction and conversion of others and the mirror representative of the time when one is practicing the doctrines pertaining to the Buddha’s enlightenment are one and the same mirror in either case, the mirror of the nature of one’s own mind.

If we apply the mirror analogy to the process of attainment of Buddhahood in one’s present form, then looking at the front of the mirror is comparable to attaining Buddhahood, while looking at the back of the mirror is comparable to being an ordinary living being.

The fact that the mirror has a back side illustrates the point that there is no cutting off or elimination of the element of evil that is inherent in the nature of the individual. And the fact that, when one faces the back side of the mirror, the power to reflect an image that is a virtue of the front side is inactive, illustrates the limited type of blessings obtained through the doctrines intended for the instruction and conversion of others. That is, at such a time the Buddha nature inherent in living beings is not in a manifest state.
The Unanimous Declaration by the Buddhas of the Three Existences regarding the Classification of the Teachings and Which Are to Be Abandoned and Which Upheld

---> https://www.nichirenlibrary.org/en/wnd-2/Content/315
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Re: if everything is upaya(means) what is daimoku ?

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tkp67 wrote: Sun May 03, 2020 1:46 pm
LastLegend wrote: Sun May 03, 2020 6:58 am The so called inexpressible, non-dual, or inconceivable is referring to that wisdom of Bodhisattvas and Buddhas just that we are being covered by delusion.
Does reducing it to such simplistic meaning offer liberation from the delusion one is covered in?
It’s not simplistic. However, if you have great expectations of what actual enlightenment is you might run into disappointment. Not just you many others as well.
Make personal vows.

End of the day: I don’t know.
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