Which school...?

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arrau76
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Which school...?

Post by arrau76 » Mon Aug 12, 2019 10:30 pm

Hi all!
I should choose a Pure Land school, but I can't decide which one. Before I practiced Vajrayana, I have a Chenresig empowerment and bodhicitta vows. I don't want to show disrespect to any buddhist traditions (I admire all the Buddha's ways to Enlightenment), so up to now I've made a mixed practice. There are no sanghas (of any schools) next to me, I should have to travel a lot for the nearest, and I know that I need a guru for practicing in the Vajrayana tradition.
When I knew about Pure Land, I liked it soon and started to recite "Namo Amitabha".
I like Jodo Shin Shu, but I can't understand why they say you can't bow even to Avalokitesvara, to whom I've always felt a great connection.
Maybe I need a more wide practice? Any advice? Thanks,
Namo Amitabha!

如傑優婆塞
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Re: Which school...?

Post by 如傑優婆塞 » Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:24 am

Before I practiced Vajrayana, I have a Chenresig empowerment and bodhicitta vows. I don't want to show disrespect to any buddhist traditions (I admire all the Buddha's ways to Enlightenment), so up to now I've made a mixed practice. There are no sanghas (of any schools) next to me, I should have to travel a lot for the nearest, and I know that I need a guru for practicing in the Vajrayana tradition.
Just curious... how & who then did you receive the empowerment & vows from in light of your logistics challenges?
I like Jodo Shin Shu, but I can't understand why they say you can't bow even to Avalokitesvara, to whom I've always felt a great connection.
Because they're an exclusive Nembutsu tradition that was sourced and shared from/by its other cousin Chinese Pure Land Tradition besides its own Japanese developments plus doctrinal motivations (which I assume you are already familiar with by now); where the latter caters for the both of the exclusive & inclusive crowds. I doubt anyone can bend the official Jōdo Shinshū doctrine and practice towards one's proclivities but in private practice, who can stop one from engaging in Kannon based practices? Think about that...

There's always the other cousin East Asian traditions like the Chinese, Korean & Vietnamese traditions with their sub lineages that promotes and practices Pure Land in a broader & inclusive perspective. Some personal due diligence in exploring the thread discussions & resources will be helpful to discover it.

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arrau76
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Re: Which school...?

Post by arrau76 » Tue Aug 13, 2019 3:26 am

如傑優婆塞 wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:24 am
Before I practiced Vajrayana, I have a Chenresig empowerment and bodhicitta vows. I don't want to show disrespect to any buddhist traditions (I admire all the Buddha's ways to Enlightenment), so up to now I've made a mixed practice. There are no sanghas (of any schools) next to me, I should have to travel a lot for the nearest, and I know that I need a guru for practicing in the Vajrayana tradition.
Just curious... how & who then did you receive the empowerment & vows from in light of your logistics challenges?

> Who? One of the most famous Tibetan masters... :)
How? A live web streaming. I watched it but I didn't know if it was effective for the web audience (I hoped it was). Later I've discovered it was.
I like Jodo Shin Shu, but I can't understand why they say you can't bow even to Avalokitesvara, to whom I've always felt a great connection.
Because they're an exclusive Nembutsu tradition that was sourced and shared from/by its other cousin Chinese Pure Land Tradition besides its own Japanese developments plus doctrinal motivations (which I assume you are already familiar with by now); where the latter caters for the both of the exclusive & inclusive crowds. I doubt anyone can bend the official Jōdo Shinshū doctrine and practice towards one's proclivities but in private practice, who can stop one from engaging in Kannon based practices? Think about that...
> I understand, but I'd prefer to follow strictly the teachings of a school. Jodo Shinshu doctrine says that to pay homage to Amida is enough because it means to pay homage to all buddhas and bodhisattvas. So I couldn't say "Om Mani Padme Hum" anymore? A bit difficult to me.
There's always the other cousin East Asian traditions like the Chinese, Korean & Vietnamese traditions with their sub lineages that promotes and practices Pure Land in a broader & inclusive perspective. Some personal due diligence in exploring the thread discussions & resources will be helpful to discover it.
> What about Fo Guang Shan? I know it's Chan and Pure Land, but it's much inclusive, and I like reading other sutras (apart the 3 PL ones) and meditating. But PL schools (Japanese ones, and Chinese "Pristine") say the best practice to obtain 100% rebirth in Sukhavati is faith in Amida and in His Primal Vow, aspiration for rebirth in Sukhavati, and Nembutsu/Nianfo. Then, I'm a bit confused now :D

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rory
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Re: Which school...?

Post by rory » Tue Aug 13, 2019 4:17 am

The Japanese Tendai ( Ch: Tiantai) school, the Lotus Sutra school, is a multi-practice school: meditation, sutra study, Pure Land, esoteric practices are all done
I'm a Pure Lander with a big devotion to Kannon-sama, I chant ch. 25 Kannon's chapter of the Lotus Sutra all the time.

It might help to give you a bit of history: Honen the founder of Jodo Shu and Shinran the founder of Jodo Shinshu were both Tendai monks but broke away to found single practice Pure Land schools. So that might explain things to you. (other famous Tendai monks also broke away like Dogen to found single practice school Soto Zen, and Eisai for Rinzai Zen and Nichiren for Nichiren)

Myoan here, I believe is a member of Jodo Shu and I think (not sure ask him) they are more lenient about auxiliary practices.

And Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean Buddhism usually have a Pure Land -Ch'an synthesis.
hope this is helpful
gassho
Rory
Namu Kanzeon Bosatsu
Chih-I:
The Tai-ching states "the women in the realms of Mara, Sakra and Brahma all neither abandoned ( their old) bodies nor received (new) bodies. They all received buddhahood with their current bodies (genshin)" Thus these verses state that the dharma nature is like a great ocean. No right or wrong is preached (within it) Ordinary people and sages are equal, without superiority or inferiority
Paul, Groner "The Lotus Sutra in Japanese Culture"eds. Tanabe p. 58
https://www.tendai-usa.org/

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arrau76
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Re: Which school...?

Post by arrau76 » Tue Aug 13, 2019 8:26 am

如傑優婆塞 wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:24 am
Before I practiced Vajrayana, I have a Chenresig empowerment and bodhicitta vows. I don't want to show disrespect to any buddhist traditions (I admire all the Buddha's ways to Enlightenment), so up to now I've made a mixed practice. There are no sanghas (of any schools) next to me, I should have to travel a lot for the nearest, and I know that I need a guru for practicing in the Vajrayana tradition.
Just curious... how & who then did you receive the empowerment & vows from in light of your logistics challenges?
I like Jodo Shin Shu, but I can't understand why they say you can't bow even to Avalokitesvara, to whom I've always felt a great connection.
Because they're an exclusive Nembutsu tradition that was sourced and shared from/by its other cousin Chinese Pure Land Tradition besides its own Japanese developments plus doctrinal motivations (which I assume you are already familiar with by now); where the latter caters for the both of the exclusive & inclusive crowds. I doubt anyone can bend the official Jōdo Shinshū doctrine and practice towards one's proclivities but in private practice, who can stop one from engaging in Kannon based practices? Think about that...

There's always the other cousin East Asian traditions like the Chinese, Korean & Vietnamese traditions with their sub lineages that promotes and practices Pure Land in a broader & inclusive perspective. Some personal due diligence in exploring the thread discussions & resources will be helpful to discover it.

I received empowerment and vows in a live web streaming of the ceremony, by one of the most famous Tibetan buddhism master (I watched the ceremony, but I didn't even know if it was effective for the web audience. Later I asked the center that organized the ceremony, and they said it was, because the Lama decided that way).

I can do Kannon based private practice. Yes, but I'd prefer to follow strictly the teachings of the school I will choose.
Last edited by Miroku on Tue Aug 13, 2019 9:49 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Edited because of meta discussion.

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arrau76
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Re: Which school...?

Post by arrau76 » Tue Aug 13, 2019 8:43 am

rory wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 4:17 am
The Japanese Tendai ( Ch: Tiantai) school, the Lotus Sutra school, is a multi-practice school: meditation, sutra study, Pure Land, esoteric practices are all done
I'm a Pure Lander with a big devotion to Kannon-sama, I chant ch. 25 Kannon's chapter of the Lotus Sutra all the time.

It might help to give you a bit of history: Honen the founder of Jodo Shu and Shinran the founder of Jodo Shinshu were both Tendai monks but broke away to found single practice Pure Land schools. So that might explain things to you. (other famous Tendai monks also broke away like Dogen to found single practice school Soto Zen, and Eisai for Rinzai Zen and Nichiren for Nichiren)

Myoan here, I believe is a member of Jodo Shu and I think (not sure ask him) they are more lenient about auxiliary practices.

And Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean Buddhism usually have a Pure Land -Ch'an synthesis.
hope this is helpful
gassho
Rory
I don't know much about Tendai, probably you need a master along this path, as in Vajrayana, and there are no sanghas near.
I was thinking about a Chan - Pure Land school, Fo Guang Shan, because I like reading other sutras (besides the three PL ones), meditating, chanting mantras etc.

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jake
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Re: Which school...?

Post by jake » Tue Aug 13, 2019 12:46 pm

arrau76 wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 8:43 am
I don't know much about Tendai, probably you need a master along this path, as in Vajrayana, and there are no sanghas near.
I was thinking about a Chan - Pure Land school, Fo Guang Shan, because I like reading other sutras (besides the three PL ones), meditating, chanting mantras etc.
Where do you reside? That may help people give you recommendations.

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Hammerheart
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Re: Which school...?

Post by Hammerheart » Tue Aug 13, 2019 5:03 pm

Hello!
I too recently began to study the Pure Land School, and I am also feeling some deep, personal connection to Guan Yin. So far I've decided to stick with Pure Land/Zen practice (which is basically Chinese Pure Land approach), and that's because of one, really important book called "Pure Land, Pure Mind". It really struck me with it's wisdom and made me realize that I don't need to abandon mine previous Zen practice in order to practice Pure Land. Moreover, both of the traditions complement each other- let me quote the book I've mentioned:
[Yung-ming’s essay entitled] Four Choices says:
First: Zen without Pure Land. Nine out of ten people take the wrong road here. If objects appear before them [as they meditate], they immediately follow them off.

This choice means that people only [strive to] illuminate reality-nature, and do not make vows to be born in the Pure Land. But as long as they flow along in this world “Endurance,” there is the danger of falling back [into delusion]

Second: Pure Land without Zen. Of ten thousand who practice [Pure Land Buddhism], ten thousand go [to the Pure Land]. They just get to see Amitabha Buddha: what worry is there that they won’t be enlightened?

This choice means that they have not yet illuminated reality-nature, but they just vow to be born in the Pure Land. Because they are riding upon the power of Buddha, they are sure to be free from doubt.

Third: Both Zen and Pure Land. This is like putting horns on a tiger [adding to its already formidable powers]. In this life these people will be teachers, and in lives to come they will be buddhas and patriarchs.

Since they profoundly comprehend the Buddha Dharma, they can be teachers to devas and humans. Moreover, they take vows to go to the Pure Land and ascend quickly to the stage from which there is no falling back …

Fourth: Neither Zen or Pure Land. This brings the torments of hell for ten thousand eons, with no one to rely on.

They do not understand the principles of Buddha, nor do they make vows to be born in the Pure Land. They sink down [into the sea of suffering] for eternal ages with no way to get out.

Good people, if you want to transcend birth and death, and experience enlightenment, choose well among these four options!
So as you see, in China Pure Land and Zen eventually became one, unified tradition, which still exists! Concerning Guan Yin practice, I don't see any obstacles to devote yourself to her! In Pure Land tradition, Guan Yin is one of Amitabha's attendants, and is helping him with task of saving sentient beings all across the universe. While it is fact that Amitabha is the central figure of Pure Land, you can practice nianfo (the remembrance of Buddha) and still do Guan Yin's mantra (Om Mani Padme Hum), chant Great Compassion Dharani or read chapter on her in Lotus Sutra. Hope that helps!

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SonamTashi
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Re: Which school...?

Post by SonamTashi » Tue Aug 13, 2019 7:11 pm

I think your best bets are Tendai or Chan/mainland Pure Land. These options allow you to practice the Pure Land dharma door without giving up practice on Avalokiteshvara. I think Jodo Shu is also less restrictive about practices towards other Bodhisattvas, like Avalokiteshvara, as long as they are used as supports to nembutsu, and not as main practices themselves.

I think the only Pure Land school that really restricts you from practicing The Mani mantra would be Shin, and perhaps the modern Pristine Pure Land school as well.
:bow: :buddha1: :bow: :anjali: :meditate:

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Re: Which school...?

Post by Sentient Light » Tue Aug 13, 2019 11:10 pm

arrau76 wrote:
Tue Aug 13, 2019 8:43 am

I don't know much about Tendai, probably you need a master along this path, as in Vajrayana, and there are no sanghas near.
I was thinking about a Chan - Pure Land school, Fo Guang Shan, because I like reading other sutras (besides the three PL ones), meditating, chanting mantras etc.
FGS are good. It's basically just Linji Chan dual-practice tradition with Pure Land, but also includes an emphasis on humanitarian work and engaging with the world through outreach and education.
:buddha1: Nam mô A di đà Phật :buddha1:
:bow: Nam mô Quan Thế Âm Bồ tát :bow:
:bow: Nam mô Đại Thế Chi Bồ Tát :bow:

:buddha1: Nam mô Bổn sư Thích ca mâu ni Phật :buddha1:
:bow: Nam mô Di lặc Bồ tát :bow:
:bow: Nam mô Địa tạng vương Bồ tát :bow:

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rory
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Re: Which school...?

Post by rory » Wed Aug 14, 2019 12:47 am

Here is a nice link to an explanation of the Tendai school:
https://www.tendai-usa.org/what-is-tendai-buddhism if you are interested write to them in the "Contact" there are priests in Europe and Brasil.

Jake, are you in France?
gassho
Rory
Namu Kanzeon Bosatsu
Chih-I:
The Tai-ching states "the women in the realms of Mara, Sakra and Brahma all neither abandoned ( their old) bodies nor received (new) bodies. They all received buddhahood with their current bodies (genshin)" Thus these verses state that the dharma nature is like a great ocean. No right or wrong is preached (within it) Ordinary people and sages are equal, without superiority or inferiority
Paul, Groner "The Lotus Sutra in Japanese Culture"eds. Tanabe p. 58
https://www.tendai-usa.org/

如傑優婆塞
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Re: Which school...?

Post by 如傑優婆塞 » Wed Aug 14, 2019 2:30 am

I understand, but I'd prefer to follow strictly the teachings of a school. Jodo Shinshu doctrine says that to pay homage to Amida is enough because it means to pay homage to all buddhas and bodhisattvas. So I couldn't say "Om Mani Padme Hum" anymore? A bit difficult to me.
This is something that none of us can help you as it's your final call to be decisive about where you want to be & what you actually want for yourself. But the reality on the ground is at the moment due to logistics challenges, you are not an official member of the sect that you speak of and neither do they have any jurisdiction on you. One could try giving oneself more leeway to explore more and less 'hasty' in decision making. Liking what they're about and formally becoming one of their members are two polar opposites, although the former is helpful in the journey towards the latter.

For instance, on the empowerment that was undertaken, what was that for? Was there a decision to be committed in the Vajrayāna tradition? And here's what is expressed: I can do Kannon based private practice. Yes, but I'd prefer to follow strictly the teachings of the school I will choose. There seems to be a strong inclination on Jōdo Shinshū but here you are with an empowerment in your 'resume'... Was a thought ever given on what was undertaken which may entail a commitment to practice within that lineage? Did they explain on the fine print that's involved?
Questions, questions, questions... :tongue:
What about Fo Guang Shan? I know it's Chan and Pure Land, but it's much inclusive, and I like reading other sutras (apart the 3 PL ones) and meditating.
My root lineage is from FGS and where I started out from. Although FGS is rooted in Línjì Chán but they are open in promoting the Chinese Buddhist 'Eight Schools', which includes Pure Land & their trademark 'Humanistic Buddhism'. Currently, it's the largest Chinese Buddhist organisation in the world and the leading top 4 Chinese Buddhist organisation in Taiwan. But, I am not in the business of promoting any one particular group for anyone. That's the homework of the seeker. At the very most, I will just furnish basic available details. But if you want to know, my strategy back then was to start off with a broad base group to absorb & learn as much as I could before moving on to specialised ones. There's an old slogan in FGS as I recall: 'study widely and learn deeply'.
But PL schools (Japanese ones, and Chinese "Pristine") say the best practice to obtain 100% rebirth in Sukhavati is faith in Amida and in His Primal Vow, aspiration for rebirth in Sukhavati, and Nembutsu/Nianfo. Then, I'm a bit confused now
Amway says that their hair shampoo is the best. Avon says that theirs is the premier in the market. What are you going to do?
Does the below look familiar?
As they sat there, the Kalamas of Kesaputta said to the Blessed One,
"Lord, there are some brahmans & contemplatives who come to Kesaputta. They expound & glorify their own doctrines, but as for the doctrines of others, they deprecate them, revile them, show contempt for them, & disparage them. And then other brahmans & contemplatives come to Kesaputta. They expound & glorify their own doctrines, but as for the doctrines of others, they deprecate them, revile them, show contempt for them, & disparage them. They leave us absolutely uncertain & in doubt: Which of these venerable brahmans & contemplatives are speaking the truth, and which ones are lying?"


Or as one Ājīvakā praised the Elder Ānanda for the rare non-bias... How amazing, sir. How astounding, that there is neither extolling of one's own Dhamma nor deprecation of another's, but just the teaching of the Dhamma in its proper sphere, speaking to the point without mentioning oneself.

At the end of it all, what's the focus? Isn't it just this?
“Shariputra, if there are people who have already made the vow, who now make the vow, or who are about to make the vow, ‘I desire to be born in Amitabha’s Country,’ these people, whether born in the past, now being born, or to be born in the future, all will irreversibly attain anuttarasamyaksambodhi. Therefore, Shariputra, all good men and good women, if they are among those who have faith, should make the vow, ‘I will be born in that country.’

When did it all became so 'complicated'? :smile:
May the Threefold Jewels & Sages of Sukhāvatī be your guiding light and path :buddha1:

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明安 Myoan
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Re: Which school...?

Post by 明安 Myoan » Wed Aug 14, 2019 8:51 pm

Greetings, Arrau.

In Shinran's Hymns of the Dharma Ages, he writes:
Amida, Avalokitesvara, and Mahasthamaprapta
Ride on the ship of the great Vow;
Going out on the ocean of birth-and-death,
They call to beings and bring them on board.
In Shinran's Hymns on Benefits in the Present, he writes:
When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
Avalokitesvara and Mahasthamaprapta,
Together with bodhisattvas countless as the Ganges’ sands or as particles,
Accompany us just as shadows do things.
This is because in the Three Pure Land Sutras, Avalokiteshvara and Mahasthamaprapta aid Amitabha Buddha in his work of ferrying beings to Sukhavati. They're called the Three Sages of the Pure Land. In the Contemplation Sutra, they are described in great detail. They continually see sentient beings and shine their light on them, too.

So you aren't forgetting Chenrezig in Pure Land Buddhism, nor being forgotten by Chenrezig.
And in Vajrayana, isn't Amitabha his guru, and his head ornament?
I suspect you'll be saying "om mani peme hung" on occasion for the rest of your life, due to the empowerment.
There's nothing to fear with Chenrezig. He will remind you of Amitabha, too.

Regarding the exclusive nembutsu, Master Honen wrote:
Master Honen -- A reply to the lay priest Kumagai wrote:Nembutsu is the practice taught in the essential vow of Amida Buddha. Other religious practices, such as observing the precepts, reciting a sutra, chanting dharani, and meditation on the noumenal aspects of reality, are not prescribed in the essential vow. For this reason, one who aspires for birth in the Pure Land must recite nembutsu first. It is acceptable for one to further perform other practices in addition to nembutsu, if one wishes. But, undoubtedly, nembutsu taught in the essential vow is sufficient in itself for birth in the Pure Land.
Master Shan-tao taught that those who only observe practices other than nembutsu while desiring birth in the Pure Land will not achieve birth in the Pure Land. The sole practice of nembutsu is the karmic cause for the certain attainment of birth in the Pure Land.
...
Virtuous deeds other than nembutsu may also be performed if one has spare time between nembutsu. However, if one recites nembutsu sixty thousand times in a single day, what else is one able to do? If one practices nembutsu thirty or fifty times a day with his whole heart, one will certainly attain birth in the Pure Land, even if one commits a few violations of the precepts.
So as 如傑優婆塞 said, it ultimately comes down to your personal affinities, which practices you find helpful in your current circumstances, which teachings speak to your condition over time.
With a heart wandering in ignorance down this path and that, to guide me I simply say Namu-Amida-Butsu. -- Ippen

The Fundamental Vow [of Amitabha Buddha] is just for such people as woodcutters and grassgatherers, vegetable pickers, drawers of water and the like, illiterate folk who merely recite the Buddha's name wholeheartedly, confident that as a result of saying "Namu Amida Butsu" they will be born into the western land. -- Master Hōnen

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arrau76
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Re: Which school...?

Post by arrau76 » Fri Aug 16, 2019 2:14 pm

Thank you all for your precious suggestions! Much appreciated and very helpful! :bow:
With regard to that Chenrezig empowerment (Kriya), the Lama assigned no commitments, no obligatory practices.
I've always chanted the Mani mantra because, as I said before, I've always felt a strong connection with Avalokiteshvara.
And, imho Bodhicitta vows implies the same commitments as Bodhisattva vows in Mahayana tradition. I wish to reborn in Amitabha's Pure Land to benefit all sentient beings in the six realms, not only for my own salvation from Samsara. Perhaps, I could say "especially for the other beings", but now, I don't know exactly if I can say so :D

Namo Amitabha!

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明安 Myoan
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Re: Which school...?

Post by 明安 Myoan » Fri Aug 16, 2019 7:38 pm

:thumbsup:
Master Honen, Commentary on the Three Pure Land Sutras wrote:According to the interpretation of our Jodo Shu, "Cultivating the heart for birth in the Pure Land is referred to as aspiration for enlightenment."
Master Honen, One-Sheet Testament wrote:To be born in Amida Buddha's Pure Land, we need only to say Namu-Amida-Butsu and believe without a doubt that we will attain birth there. Resolutely reciting the nembutsu and believing in birth in the Pure Land naturally give rise to the Three Minds and the Four Modes of Practice.
These Three Minds and Four Modes of Practice nourished by nembutsu, regardless of school, will bring benefit to you and to others :smile:
With a heart wandering in ignorance down this path and that, to guide me I simply say Namu-Amida-Butsu. -- Ippen

The Fundamental Vow [of Amitabha Buddha] is just for such people as woodcutters and grassgatherers, vegetable pickers, drawers of water and the like, illiterate folk who merely recite the Buddha's name wholeheartedly, confident that as a result of saying "Namu Amida Butsu" they will be born into the western land. -- Master Hōnen

steveb1
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Re: Which school...?

Post by steveb1 » Fri Aug 16, 2019 10:39 pm

My own school is that of Shinran and Rennyo - Jodo Shinshu/Shin. Of all the Pure Land schools I've been exposed to, I found that this particular sect fit me like a glove, and I converted to it after a long period of searching.

Its main tenet is expressed in-and-as total reliance on Amitabha/Amida Buddha for salvation from ego and samsara and for ultimate Enlightenment in the Pure Land where the Buddha's grace sparks or vivifies our hitherto dormant Buddha Nature, and we then become Buddhas ourselves.

Shin eschews all self-power, "calculating" methods such as are prominent in other schools, such as meditation, multiple recitations, visualization, concentration, etc. - on the principle that in this age of Dharma Decline or Mappo Age, we "bombus" (unenlightened beings led by ego and blind passions) are mostly incapable of attaining Enlightenment via self-power methods. Hence we rely only on the Buddha, especially his Eighteenth Vow, where he promises never to cease working for the Buddhahood of all sentient beings, for our salvation and ultimate Enlightenment.

The OP asks what schools might be recommended. I can't possibly know what is best for any inquirer. But I can testify that for me, Shin trades the brokenness of my former self-efforts toward Buddhahood for the assurance of salvation in Amitabha Buddha, who in his transcendent compassion works fulfillment of Buddhahood for those who are no longer capable of attaining it for themselves.

The only practice in Shin is Nembutsu recitation, which is neither a prayer nor a practice that aims toward Enlightenment. On the contrary, the Nembutsu - "Namo Amida Butsu" / "I take refuge in, and express gratitude toward Amitabha Buddha" - is a simple, heartfelt expression of gratitude to the Buddha who saves us in spite of ourselves.

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arrau76
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Re: Which school...?

Post by arrau76 » Mon Sep 09, 2019 4:40 pm

Thanks, Steve! Thanks, Myoan! Sorry for the late reply. I'm reading some Shin Buddhism texts.
When you singlemindedly recite Amida’s Name, Avalokiteshvara and Mahasthamaprapta will always follow you and protect you, just as shadows follow objects. They are like your close friends and teachers.
(Kyogyoshinsho, chapter III, "The True Disciple of The Buddha")

The fact that fulfilment of traditional Buddhist meditative practices and ethical prescriptions are not, in themselves, considered a requirement for attaining enlightenment in Shin Buddhism - as such practices rely on the fallible ego for their success - does not imply that they cannot be practiced as a spontaneous act of gratitude to the Buddha. It is not the acts themselves that are important but the attitude in which they are undertaken.
(from "A Primer of Shin Buddhism" on nembutsu.info)

:namaste:

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