Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post Reply
User avatar
PauloJ
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon May 07, 2018 12:04 am

Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by PauloJ » Thu Jan 17, 2019 11:00 pm

I don't know if anyone has ever done any topic like this, but my question is:
Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras? And / or : how is the authoritative aspect of these Sutras based/established?

I'm a Shin practitioner and... sometimes this question arises in my mind.

Gasshô

Sentient Light
Posts: 264
Joined: Thu Sep 15, 2016 8:40 pm
Location: Pacifica, California

Re: Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by Sentient Light » Thu Jan 17, 2019 11:58 pm

Tradition would assert that the Sukhavativyuha sutras were taught by the Buddha himself, one of the rare occasions where a definitively Mahayana text isn't presented as being retrieved later.

The Contemplation Sutra, imo, probably began life as a meditation manual, and was rendered into sutra-form later. As such, the authorship is unknown.

Buddhanusmrti is taught in all schools of Buddhism, so at the very least, if the contemporaneous Buddhas thing doesn't hold up, the practice of mindfulness-of-Buddha alone has considerable merits.

The (Longer) Sukhavativyuha Sutra is one of the earliest Buddhist texts we have evidence for, let alone one of the earliest Mahayana texts. We know for certain that Amitabha was well known by the time of our very earliest understanding of Mahayana Buddhism, and the specific practice of reciting the Buddha's name as a method of Buddhanusmrti -- keeping in mind this is also practiced in Theravada anyway -- is first attested to in the Mahayana scriptures through the Prajnaparamita texts. Without question, the PPJ class of texts are the earliest Buddhist texts we have, period, composed no later than the 1st century BCE, and much more likely to be significantly earlier (a conservative guess being the 2nd century BCE).

To put it simply: to reject Pure Land is to reject the whole of Mahayana; they are implicitly bound to one another, and the Pure Land, PPJ, and samadhi texts all appear to sit at the earliest stratum of Mahayana Buddhism as we understand it.

Worth noting that Buddha-fields are discussed in Sravakayana literature, independent of Mahayana thought, including some Theravadin commentaries, the Dharmaguptaka Dirgha-agama, and the Lokkataravadin Mahavastu, so if the ideas of Pure Lands were a later development, it was developed among the Early Nikayas.
:buddha1: Nam mô A di đà Phật :buddha1:
:bow: Nam mô Quan Thế Âm Bồ tát :bow:
:bow: Nam mô Đại Thế Chi Bồ Tát :bow:

:buddha1: Nam mô Bổn sư Thích ca mâu ni Phật :buddha1:
:bow: Nam mô Di lặc Bồ tát :bow:
:bow: Nam mô Địa tạng vương Bồ tát :bow:

User avatar
PauloJ
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon May 07, 2018 12:04 am

Re: Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by PauloJ » Fri Jan 18, 2019 12:48 am

Sentient Light wrote:
Thu Jan 17, 2019 11:58 pm
Tradition would assert that the Sukhavativyuha sutras were taught by the Buddha himself, one of the rare occasions where a definitively Mahayana text isn't presented as being retrieved later.

The Contemplation Sutra, imo, probably began life as a meditation manual, and was rendered into sutra-form later. As such, the authorship is unknown.

Buddhanusmrti is taught in all schools of Buddhism, so at the very least, if the contemporaneous Buddhas thing doesn't hold up, the practice of mindfulness-of-Buddha alone has considerable merits.

The (Longer) Sukhavativyuha Sutra is one of the earliest Buddhist texts we have evidence for, let alone one of the earliest Mahayana texts. We know for certain that Amitabha was well known by the time of our very earliest understanding of Mahayana Buddhism, and the specific practice of reciting the Buddha's name as a method of Buddhanusmrti -- keeping in mind this is also practiced in Theravada anyway -- is first attested to in the Mahayana scriptures through the Prajnaparamita texts. Without question, the PPJ class of texts are the earliest Buddhist texts we have, period, composed no later than the 1st century BCE, and much more likely to be significantly earlier (a conservative guess being the 2nd century BCE).

To put it simply: to reject Pure Land is to reject the whole of Mahayana; they are implicitly bound to one another, and the Pure Land, PPJ, and samadhi texts all appear to sit at the earliest stratum of Mahayana Buddhism as we understand it.

Worth noting that Buddha-fields are discussed in Sravakayana literature, independent of Mahayana thought, including some Theravadin commentaries, the Dharmaguptaka Dirgha-agama, and the Lokkataravadin Mahavastu, so if the ideas of Pure Lands were a later development, it was developed among the Early Nikayas.
Thank you, you made it quite clear .

:applause:

User avatar
Wayfarer
Global Moderator
Posts: 4401
Joined: Sun May 27, 2012 8:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Re: Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by Wayfarer » Fri Jan 18, 2019 10:00 am

It also needs to be understood that in pre—modern times, the whole concept of authority and authorship was completely different. In classical cultures, individual scribes and redactors of texts would never take credit for originating a text. The text was literally ‘the word’, whether or not us moderns would see it that way. The job of the person who transcribed it or produced an edition was never to create or innovate or be an originator, whereas in our individualist culture, that is what is most highly prized. So whomever originated those texts would blanch at the idea that they ‘authored’ them. As far as they were concerned, they were simply transcribing the Buddha’s teaching.
Only practice with no gaining idea ~ Suzuki Roshi

User avatar
PauloJ
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon May 07, 2018 12:04 am

Re: Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by PauloJ » Sun Jan 20, 2019 4:05 pm

Wayfarer wrote:
Fri Jan 18, 2019 10:00 am
It also needs to be understood that in pre—modern times, the whole concept of authority and authorship was completely different. In classical cultures, individual scribes and redactors of texts would never take credit for originating a text. The text was literally ‘the word’, whether or not us moderns would see it that way. The job of the person who transcribed it or produced an edition was never to create or innovate or be an originator, whereas in our individualist culture, that is what is most highly prized. So whomever originated those texts would blanch at the idea that they ‘authored’ them. As far as they were concerned, they were simply transcribing the Buddha’s teaching.
:good:

User avatar
Mönlam Tharchin
Global Moderator
Posts: 2124
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 7:11 am

Re: Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by Mönlam Tharchin » Sun Jan 20, 2019 4:10 pm

PauloJ wrote:
Thu Jan 17, 2019 11:00 pm
And / or : how is the authoritative aspect of these Sutras based/established?
At first for us, through taking the Sutras at their word as words of the Buddha.
Later, experience with the positive results of even thinking of Sukhavati and Amida becomes the authority. I think it's this way no matter the sutra. It has to work, to hold together with the whole of the Dharma, or it's meaningless to us, datable or not.
With a heart wandering in ignorance down this path and that
to guide me, I simply say Namu-amida-butsu.
-- Ippen

"If sentient beings are touched by His radiance, their three afflictions will be eliminated and their bodies and minds will become gentle. They will be filled with joy and exuberance as benevolence arises in their minds. If those who are in extreme suffering, taking any of the three evil life-journeys, see this radiance, they can rest, no more pain or distress." -- Sutra of Amitāyus Buddha

The Teachings of Master Hōnen

User avatar
PauloJ
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon May 07, 2018 12:04 am

Re: Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by PauloJ » Sun Jan 20, 2019 4:38 pm

Monlam Tharchin wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 4:10 pm
PauloJ wrote:
Thu Jan 17, 2019 11:00 pm
And / or : how is the authoritative aspect of these Sutras based/established?
At first for us, through taking the Sutras at their word as words of the Buddha.
Later, experience with the positive results of even thinking of Sukhavati and Amida becomes the authority. I think it's this way no matter the sutra. It has to work, to hold together with the whole of the Dharma, or it's meaningless to us, datable or not.
When you speak about 'positive results' - what exactly do you mean?

User avatar
Mönlam Tharchin
Global Moderator
Posts: 2124
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 7:11 am

Re: Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by Mönlam Tharchin » Sun Jan 20, 2019 6:08 pm

For example, those listed in the 48 Vows of the Larger Sutra, all made to benefit beings. Several, such as the 33rd, apply not only to the residents of Sukhavati:
Vow 33 : If, when I attain Buddhahood, sentient beings in the immeasurable and inconceivable Buddha-lands of the ten quarters who have been touched by my light, should not feel peace and happiness in their bodies and minds surpassing those of humans and devas, may I not attain perfect Enlightenment.
There are also the ten benefits a nembutsu devotee enjoys described by Shinran.

The vow above has touched me most during times of suffering, when all I could do was call out Amida's name.

It took me a few years to settle. Just stay close to Amida, through highs and lows, faith and doubt, and I think what nembutsu actually does for us becomes clearer.
With a heart wandering in ignorance down this path and that
to guide me, I simply say Namu-amida-butsu.
-- Ippen

"If sentient beings are touched by His radiance, their three afflictions will be eliminated and their bodies and minds will become gentle. They will be filled with joy and exuberance as benevolence arises in their minds. If those who are in extreme suffering, taking any of the three evil life-journeys, see this radiance, they can rest, no more pain or distress." -- Sutra of Amitāyus Buddha

The Teachings of Master Hōnen

User avatar
Mönlam Tharchin
Global Moderator
Posts: 2124
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 7:11 am

Re: Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by Mönlam Tharchin » Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:21 am

An addendum to the above, with more information. From shinranworks.com, which is a free compendium of Shinran's writings, there are these lovely stanzas:
Fifteen Hymns

96

Amida Tathagata came forth and guided beings,
Teaching the “Chapter on Life-span”
In the Sutra of Golden Splendor
In order to end calamities and ensure long life.

Note: taught by Bhaisajyaguru in the eastern quarter, Samkusumitaraja in the southern quarter, Amitayus Buddha in the western quarter, and Sakyamuni in the northern quarter.
Came forth: come and regard with compassion.
End calamities: put an end to the seven calamities.
Sutra of Golden Splendor: a sutra of four fascicles. It is called the Most Excellent King Sutra.
The Chapter on Life-span: the tenth fascicle. It was taught by Amida.

97

Out of compassionate concern for the people of the land,
Master Saicho of Mount Hiei said that
One should utter “Namu-amida-butsu”
As a spell for eliminating the seven calamities.

Spell: to recite from memory.

98

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
Which surpasses all virtues,
Our heavy obstructions of evil – past, present, and future –
Are all unfailingly transformed, becoming light.

Becoming light: becoming small, slight.

99

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
The benefits we gain in the present are boundless;
The karmic evil of our transmigration in birth-and-death disappears,
And determinate karma and untimely death are eliminated.

100

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
Brahma and Indra venerate us;
All the benevolent gods of the heavens
Protect us constantly, day and night.

101

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
The four great deva-kings together
Protect us constantly, day and night,
And let no evil spirits come near.

102

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
The earth-goddess called Firmness
Reveres and protects us constantly, day and night,
Accompanying us always just as shadows do things.

103

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
Nanda, Upananda, and the other great nagas,
Along with the countless naga-gods, revere
And protect us constantly, day and night.

104

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
Yama, the king of the dead, reveres us,
And the officers who judge the beings of the five courses of existence
All protect us constantly, day and night.

105

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
We are protected by the great king of maras
Residing in the sixth heaven;
This he vowed to do in the presence of Sakyamuni Buddha.

106

The gods of the heavens and earth
Are all to be called good,
For together they protect
The person of the nembutsu.

107

Shinjin that is the inconceivable working of the power of the Vow
Is none other than the mind aspiring for great enlightenment;
The evil spirits that abound in heaven and earth
All hold in awe the person who has attained it.

108

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
Avalokitesvara and Mahasthamaprapta,
Together with bodhisattvas countless as the Ganges’ sands or as particles,
Accompany us just as shadows do things.

109

Countless Amida Buddhas reside
In the light of the Buddha of Unhindered Light;
Each one of these transformed Buddhas protects
The person of true and real shinjin.

110

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
The countless Buddhas throughout the ten quarters,
Surrounding us a hundredfold, a thousandfold,
Rejoice in and protect us.[/color]
Each benefit here has no precondition, only nembutsu, then the benefit appears. That's why the Shorter Amitabha Sutra says this is a very difficult Dharma to accept.
48 Vows of Amida wrote:12. If, when I attain Buddhahood, my light should be limited, unable to illuminate at least a hundred thousand kotis of nayutas of Buddha-lands, may I not attain perfect Enlightenment.
That means we too can see it. According to Masters Shinran, Honen, Shandao, you do that by reciting nembutsu the rest of your life, no matter the time, place, position, health, mental state, worries, problems, or how learned we are, or how many or few we can recite in one sitting.

Even so, it's taken me about last five years to finally admit that this teaching has, in specific instances, proven to be safe, beneficial, worth the effort, worth the growing pains. Nembutsu is like a lamp already lit.
With a heart wandering in ignorance down this path and that
to guide me, I simply say Namu-amida-butsu.
-- Ippen

"If sentient beings are touched by His radiance, their three afflictions will be eliminated and their bodies and minds will become gentle. They will be filled with joy and exuberance as benevolence arises in their minds. If those who are in extreme suffering, taking any of the three evil life-journeys, see this radiance, they can rest, no more pain or distress." -- Sutra of Amitāyus Buddha

The Teachings of Master Hōnen

User avatar
PauloJ
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon May 07, 2018 12:04 am

Re: Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by PauloJ » Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:45 am

Monlam Tharchin wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:21 am
An addendum to the above, with more information. From shinranworks.com, which is a free compendium of Shinran's writings, there are these lovely stanzas:
Fifteen Hymns

96

Amida Tathagata came forth and guided beings,
Teaching the “Chapter on Life-span”
In the Sutra of Golden Splendor
In order to end calamities and ensure long life.

Note: taught by Bhaisajyaguru in the eastern quarter, Samkusumitaraja in the southern quarter, Amitayus Buddha in the western quarter, and Sakyamuni in the northern quarter.
Came forth: come and regard with compassion.
End calamities: put an end to the seven calamities.
Sutra of Golden Splendor: a sutra of four fascicles. It is called the Most Excellent King Sutra.
The Chapter on Life-span: the tenth fascicle. It was taught by Amida.

97

Out of compassionate concern for the people of the land,
Master Saicho of Mount Hiei said that
One should utter “Namu-amida-butsu”
As a spell for eliminating the seven calamities.

Spell: to recite from memory.

98

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
Which surpasses all virtues,
Our heavy obstructions of evil – past, present, and future –
Are all unfailingly transformed, becoming light.

Becoming light: becoming small, slight.

99

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
The benefits we gain in the present are boundless;
The karmic evil of our transmigration in birth-and-death disappears,
And determinate karma and untimely death are eliminated.

100

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
Brahma and Indra venerate us;
All the benevolent gods of the heavens
Protect us constantly, day and night.

101

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
The four great deva-kings together
Protect us constantly, day and night,
And let no evil spirits come near.

102

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
The earth-goddess called Firmness
Reveres and protects us constantly, day and night,
Accompanying us always just as shadows do things.

103

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
Nanda, Upananda, and the other great nagas,
Along with the countless naga-gods, revere
And protect us constantly, day and night.

104

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
Yama, the king of the dead, reveres us,
And the officers who judge the beings of the five courses of existence
All protect us constantly, day and night.

105

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
We are protected by the great king of maras
Residing in the sixth heaven;
This he vowed to do in the presence of Sakyamuni Buddha.

106

The gods of the heavens and earth
Are all to be called good,
For together they protect
The person of the nembutsu.

107

Shinjin that is the inconceivable working of the power of the Vow
Is none other than the mind aspiring for great enlightenment;
The evil spirits that abound in heaven and earth
All hold in awe the person who has attained it.

108

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
Avalokitesvara and Mahasthamaprapta,
Together with bodhisattvas countless as the Ganges’ sands or as particles,
Accompany us just as shadows do things.

109

Countless Amida Buddhas reside
In the light of the Buddha of Unhindered Light;
Each one of these transformed Buddhas protects
The person of true and real shinjin.

110

When we say “Namu-amida-butsu,”
The countless Buddhas throughout the ten quarters,
Surrounding us a hundredfold, a thousandfold,
Rejoice in and protect us.[/color]
Each benefit here has no precondition, only nembutsu, then the benefit appears. That's why the Shorter Amitabha Sutra says this is a very difficult Dharma to accept.
48 Vows of Amida wrote:12. If, when I attain Buddhahood, my light should be limited, unable to illuminate at least a hundred thousand kotis of nayutas of Buddha-lands, may I not attain perfect Enlightenment.
That means we too can see it. According to Masters Shinran, Honen, Shandao, you do that by reciting nembutsu the rest of your life, no matter the time, place, position, health, mental state, worries, problems, or how learned we are, or how many or few we can recite in one sitting.

Even so, it's taken me about last five years to finally admit that this teaching has, in specific instances, proven to be safe, beneficial, worth the effort, worth the growing pains. Nembutsu is like a lamp already lit.
:reading:

Your answers will really help me. Thank you very much.

User avatar
Mönlam Tharchin
Global Moderator
Posts: 2124
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 7:11 am

Re: Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by Mönlam Tharchin » Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:50 am

:smile:
With a heart wandering in ignorance down this path and that
to guide me, I simply say Namu-amida-butsu.
-- Ippen

"If sentient beings are touched by His radiance, their three afflictions will be eliminated and their bodies and minds will become gentle. They will be filled with joy and exuberance as benevolence arises in their minds. If those who are in extreme suffering, taking any of the three evil life-journeys, see this radiance, they can rest, no more pain or distress." -- Sutra of Amitāyus Buddha

The Teachings of Master Hōnen

User avatar
PauloJ
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon May 07, 2018 12:04 am

Re: Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by PauloJ » Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:55 am

Each benefit here has no precondition, only nembutsu, then the benefit appears. That's why the Shorter Amitabha Sutra says this is a very difficult Dharma to accept.
This really means that it is difficult to accept - because solely the practice of nembutsu is enough to brings out that benefits?

User avatar
Mönlam Tharchin
Global Moderator
Posts: 2124
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 7:11 am

Re: Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by Mönlam Tharchin » Mon Jan 21, 2019 5:15 am

Nembutsu is a name for Amida, like Paulo is for you, and "house" for all the parts that make a house.
That seems to be how we think, a name that points to something else. In this case, a buddha within a teaching who has vowed and accomplished specific things to help us :smile:
Nembutsu benefited me when I was still learning about it.
As I learned more about Mahayana Buddhism, reading Shinran (hard to read in English too, don't worry!), Honen, Shandao, and similar thinkers like Yinguang, reading the Three Pure Land Sutras, it made nembutsu get deeper somehow.
Everyone says study supports practice, and practice supports study.
It can take time for it to start to come together.

As you think of nembutsu in all kinds of situations, you feel what kind of character it has.
I've found it helpful in many ways :smile:
With a heart wandering in ignorance down this path and that
to guide me, I simply say Namu-amida-butsu.
-- Ippen

"If sentient beings are touched by His radiance, their three afflictions will be eliminated and their bodies and minds will become gentle. They will be filled with joy and exuberance as benevolence arises in their minds. If those who are in extreme suffering, taking any of the three evil life-journeys, see this radiance, they can rest, no more pain or distress." -- Sutra of Amitāyus Buddha

The Teachings of Master Hōnen

Sentient Light
Posts: 264
Joined: Thu Sep 15, 2016 8:40 pm
Location: Pacifica, California

Re: Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by Sentient Light » Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:56 pm

PauloJ wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:55 am
Each benefit here has no precondition, only nembutsu, then the benefit appears. That's why the Shorter Amitabha Sutra says this is a very difficult Dharma to accept.
This really means that it is difficult to accept - because solely the practice of nembutsu is enough to brings out that benefits?
From this post: https://www.reddit.com/r/PureLand/comme ... h/edj5ays/
Sūtra of Mahā-Prajñā-Pāramitā Pronounced by Mañjuśrī Bodhisattva wrote: If good men and good women aspire to enter the One Action Samādhi, they should sit properly in an open place, facing the direction of a Buddha, abandon distracting thoughts and appearances, focus their minds on that Buddha, and keep saying His name. If they can continue, thought after thought, thinking of one Buddha, they will be able to see, in their thinking, past, future, and present Buddhas. Why? Because the merit acquired from thinking of one Buddha is immeasurable and boundless, no different from the merit acquired from thinking of innumerable Buddhas or thinking of the inconceivable Buddha Dharma. They all will realize true suchness and attain the perfect enlightenment, acquiring immeasurable merit and eloquence. Those who enter the One Action Samādhi in this way will know that there are no differentiated appearances in the dharma realm of Buddhas, who are as numerous as the sands of the Ganges. Although among voice-hearers Ānanda is foremost in the Buddha Dharma he has heard, in his total retention of memory, and in his eloquence and wisdom, his attainment has a measure and a limit. If one has attained the One Action Samādhi, one will be able to differentiate one by one the Dharma Doors in the sūtras and to know them all, without obstructions. One will be able to expound them day and night unceasingly with wisdom and eloquence.
I think this bit glues together Pure Land methods and the rest of Mahayana Buddhadharma quite neatly.
:buddha1: Nam mô A di đà Phật :buddha1:
:bow: Nam mô Quan Thế Âm Bồ tát :bow:
:bow: Nam mô Đại Thế Chi Bồ Tát :bow:

:buddha1: Nam mô Bổn sư Thích ca mâu ni Phật :buddha1:
:bow: Nam mô Di lặc Bồ tát :bow:
:bow: Nam mô Địa tạng vương Bồ tát :bow:

User avatar
PauloJ
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon May 07, 2018 12:04 am

Re: Who was the author (or authors) of the Pure Land Sutras?

Post by PauloJ » Mon Jan 21, 2019 7:39 pm

Sentient Light wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:56 pm
PauloJ wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:55 am
Each benefit here has no precondition, only nembutsu, then the benefit appears. That's why the Shorter Amitabha Sutra says this is a very difficult Dharma to accept.
This really means that it is difficult to accept - because solely the practice of nembutsu is enough to brings out that benefits?
From this post: https://www.reddit.com/r/PureLand/comme ... h/edj5ays/
Sūtra of Mahā-Prajñā-Pāramitā Pronounced by Mañjuśrī Bodhisattva wrote: If good men and good women aspire to enter the One Action Samādhi, they should sit properly in an open place, facing the direction of a Buddha, abandon distracting thoughts and appearances, focus their minds on that Buddha, and keep saying His name. If they can continue, thought after thought, thinking of one Buddha, they will be able to see, in their thinking, past, future, and present Buddhas. Why? Because the merit acquired from thinking of one Buddha is immeasurable and boundless, no different from the merit acquired from thinking of innumerable Buddhas or thinking of the inconceivable Buddha Dharma. They all will realize true suchness and attain the perfect enlightenment, acquiring immeasurable merit and eloquence. Those who enter the One Action Samādhi in this way will know that there are no differentiated appearances in the dharma realm of Buddhas, who are as numerous as the sands of the Ganges. Although among voice-hearers Ānanda is foremost in the Buddha Dharma he has heard, in his total retention of memory, and in his eloquence and wisdom, his attainment has a measure and a limit. If one has attained the One Action Samādhi, one will be able to differentiate one by one the Dharma Doors in the sūtras and to know them all, without obstructions. One will be able to expound them day and night unceasingly with wisdom and eloquence.
I think this bit glues together Pure Land methods and the rest of Mahayana Buddhadharma quite neatly.

I loved this quote.

Namu Amida Butsu. :bow:

Post Reply

Return to “Pure Land”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Shaku Kenshin and 18 guests