"Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

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climb-up
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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by climb-up » Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:30 pm

This discussion is (...almost) making me want to re-look at his stuff, because at the time I was looking at it (I think I was 17) I found it very profound.
I only ever read his "Book of Secrets" commentary on the VBT, and one that described his active meditation. Maybe the profundity had more to do with the VBT than the commentary (...or maybe I just had lower standards back then).

So far (almost done with part 5) is pretty good, but it's not quite as interesting as I thought it would be.
The first episode was very interesting, and the next few focused on the budding tensions and political maneuvering which was fascinating in a, "OMG! I can't believe thats what they were up to!"
but it seems to just be on that path, focusing only on the major dispute. That is very interesting, but I suspect could have been condensed into one movie or a couple episodes.
It was disappointing, as Sherab Rigdrol mentioned, that Osho's real teachings were not every talked about and the commune life wasn't either; ...but I guess thats to be expected.

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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by Sherab Rigdrol » Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:34 pm

I wasn't disappointed that they didn't show his teachings. I was upset they didn't do a more immersive look into his pathology and upbringing.

He had some killer rants post Antelope for sure though.
https://www.amazon.com/Jesus-Crucified- ... s=rajneesh

climb-up
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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by climb-up » Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:21 pm

Sherab Rigdrol wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:34 pm
I wasn't disappointed that they didn't show his teachings. I was upset they didn't do a more immersive look into his pathology and upbringing.

He had some killer rants post Antelope for sure though.
https://www.amazon.com/Jesus-Crucified- ... s=rajneesh
Oh yes, that would have been really good.
I was thinking of just a better understanding of what it was that people where hearing that was bringing them in. Was it really sex and rock n' roll, etc.. I like the format of giving the opposing sides free voice, more or less; I think that would have been interesting with some of his actual thoughts (...although, according to Sheelah, it was all a scam).
Going into to his upbringing would be great too.

Basically, I just thought that he would be more of a focus of the show, as opposed to more of a background character in the description of various events.

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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by dzogchungpa » Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:43 pm

climb-up wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:30 pm
This discussion is (...almost) making me want to re-look at his stuff, because at the time I was looking at it (I think I was 17) I found it very profound.
I only ever read his "Book of Secrets" commentary on the VBT, and one that described his active meditation. Maybe the profundity had more to do with the VBT than the commentary (...or maybe I just had lower standards back then).

So far (almost done with part 5) is pretty good, but it's not quite as interesting as I thought it would be.
The first episode was very interesting, and the next few focused on the budding tensions and political maneuvering which was fascinating in a, "OMG! I can't believe thats what they were up to!"
but it seems to just be on that path, focusing only on the major dispute. That is very interesting, but I suspect could have been condensed into one movie or a couple episodes.
It was disappointing, as Sherab Rigdrol mentioned, that Osho's real teachings were not every talked about and the commune life wasn't either; ...but I guess thats to be expected.

You might want to look at this relatively new book.
I haven't read it yet, but it looks like it might be intresting and I just requested it from my library system.
Last edited by dzogchungpa on Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
There is not only nothingness because there is always, and always can manifest. - Thinley Norbu Rinpoche

climb-up
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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by climb-up » Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:46 pm

dzogchungpa wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:43 pm
climb-up wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:30 pm
This discussion is (...almost) making me want to re-look at his stuff, because at the time I was looking at it (I think I was 17) I found it very profound.
I only ever read his "Book of Secrets" commentary on the VBT, and one that described his active meditation. Maybe the profundity had more to do with the VBT than the commentary (...or maybe I just had lower standards back then).

So far (almost done with part 5) is pretty good, but it's not quite as interesting as I thought it would be.
The first episode was very interesting, and the next few focused on the budding tensions and political maneuvering which was fascinating in a, "OMG! I can't believe thats what they were up to!"
but it seems to just be on that path, focusing only on the major dispute. That is very interesting, but I suspect could have been condensed into one movie or a couple episodes.
It was disappointing, as Sherab Rigdrol mentioned, that Osho's real teachings were not every talked about and the commune life wasn't either; ...but I guess thats to be expected.

You might want to look at this relatively new book: https://www.amazon.com/Zorba-Buddha-Spi ... 0520286677
I haven't read it yet, but it looks like it might be intresting and I just requested it from my library.
Oh, that does look interesting.
I haven't read, but have perused, a couple of Hugh Urban's books and they look interesting. I'll check it out!

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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by steveb1 » Tue Apr 03, 2018 4:40 am

I thought the producers did a fair and balanced job, especially when one considers the incredible wealth of media material available from that time from both the Rajneeshees and the secular press.

I visited the Oregon commune in a one-day field trip, as part of an Oregon State University class titled, "Gandhi and Rajneesh". We took an old yellow school bus from Corvallis to the remote ashram in Central Oregon. This was in May, 1984.

My impressions of the place were mostly positive. No guns were in sight, and we students had the run of the place. We were also taken on various tours on the Ranch, including visiting their state-of-the-art greenhouses. We saw Bhagwan/Osho twice on his daily drive-by. We met "Bapuji", his adopted father, Swami Teertha, a higher-up disciple, and the beautiful Ma Isabel. Teertha held a question-and-answer session with us.

I am in no position to judge Bhagwan's spiritual status. I can only repeat a commentator's "blurb" on the back of one of Osho's book covers, to the effect that in listening to Osho, one cannot escape the impression that one is "hearing Enlightenment speaking of itself". This is my own indelible impression, and it has lasted in spite of all the scandals, rumors of his drug use, etc.

I won't engage in arguments over him or Sheela, but I believe that it is always important to recall that it was Rajneesh himself who blew the whistle on Sheela, invited the FBI to investigate the Ranch - and to his apparently real surprise, found that Sheela had bugged his own house. Moreover, it was the the opinion of those closest to him that a certain amount of weapons and the "peace force" were in fact being utilized for the purpose of keeping Rajneesh, and those close disciples, prisoners in his own compound. Eventually, the worse the Feds could muster against him was an apparent "arranging of sham marriages" - but no involvement in the Salmonella poisonings in the Dalles, or any other of the depredations of "Sheela and her gang". His arrest at the Charlotte airport was carried out without telling Osho of any specific charges, and he virtually disappeared in an overly-long transport from Charlotte back to Oregon, during which not even his attorneys were told his whereabouts. "Data is divided" as to his purpose in leaving the Ranch. He said he wanted to take a short break away from the commune in order to avoid a government-sponsored blood bath. His timing was fortunate, because he left the ashram on the day prior to a planned armed invasion of the commune, which forestalled the anticipate takeover.

Osho brought profound spiritual truths and perspectives into my religious life as much as did Carl Jung and other spiritual teachers I've met along my path. For that I will always be grateful to "the Golden Guru", and for me, nothing can tarnish this aspect of his mission. The world can judge the rest of it on the world's terms. And the new documentary does a fine job of presenting Osho and Company to the world. I highly recommend it.

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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by madhusudan » Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:24 am

I've seen the first episode and intend to finish the series just for the sake of sick comedy. It's always puzzling to me that with the presence of undiluted Buddha Dharma people would instead choose this type of ridiculousness. I guess it's a testament to the power of ego.

Here's an article I drew up from a quick search regarding their philosophy. Not by the man himself, but a follower it seems, and published by the government of India (.gov?):

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3705694/

Laugh your ass off or cry, your choice. I found it by typing "osho sex".



(edited for word choice)

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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by Grigoris » Tue Apr 03, 2018 8:04 am

Sherab Rigdrol wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:34 pm
I wasn't disappointed that they didn't show his teachings. I was upset they didn't do a more immersive look into his pathology and upbringing.

He had some killer rants post Antelope for sure though.
https://www.amazon.com/Jesus-Crucified- ... s=rajneesh
How much of a self-obsessed w*nker would you have to be to compare yourself to Christ?
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde

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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by Grigoris » Tue Apr 03, 2018 8:18 am

dzogchungpa wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:43 pm
I haven't read it yet, but it looks like it might be intresting and I just requested it from my library system.
See that's the thing with Osho, he completely lacked any originality, intelligence and credibility so he ripped off other traditions and people, re-branding their original ideas and practices as his own.

Instead of reading "Zorba the Buddha" I would highly recommend reading the book "Zorba the Greek" by the author Nikos Kazantzakis. Kazantzakis is brilliant at weaving together philosophy and fiction. He leant heavily towards mystical existentialism. When Kazantzakis was nominated for the Nobel prize for literature, he lost to Albert Camus by one vote. Camus stated in the periodical "The Philosopher's Magazine" that Kazantzakis deserved the prize "a hundred times more than himself". Kazantzakis was nominated nine times for the Nobel prize for literature.

And along comes Osho and rips him off, shamelessly, just to buy another Rolls Royce (he had 93 of them in total).

Did I mention that Osho was a w*nker? Oh yeah, I did. In the post directly above this one.
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde

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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by dzogchungpa » Tue Apr 03, 2018 4:05 pm

Grigoris wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 8:18 am
dzogchungpa wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:43 pm
I haven't read it yet, but it looks like it might be intresting and I just requested it from my library system.
See that's the thing with Osho, he completely lacked any originality, intelligence and credibility so he ripped off other traditions and people, re-branding their original ideas and practices as his own.

Instead of reading "Zorba the Buddha" I would highly recommend reading the book "Zorba the Greek" by the author Nikos Kazantzakis. Kazantzakis is brilliant at weaving together philosophy and fiction. He leant heavily towards mystical existentialism. When Kazantzakis was nominated for the Nobel prize for literature, he lost to Albert Camus by one vote. Camus stated in the periodical "The Philosopher's Magazine" that Kazantzakis deserved the prize "a hundred times more than himself". Kazantzakis was nominated nine times for the Nobel prize for literature.

And along comes Osho and rips him off, shamelessly, just to buy another Rolls Royce (he had 93 of them in total).

Did I mention that Osho was a w*nker? Oh yeah, I did. In the post directly above this one.


It's interesting that this has come up because just this past Sunday I heard Anam Thubten say that if you want to understand Guru Rinpoche you should watch "Zorba the Greek". :smile:

Also, I think you're allowed to write 'wanker'.
There is not only nothingness because there is always, and always can manifest. - Thinley Norbu Rinpoche

climb-up
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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by climb-up » Tue Apr 03, 2018 5:16 pm

dzogchungpa wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 4:05 pm

It's interesting that this has come up because just this past Sunday I heard Anam Thubten say that if you want to understand Guru Rinpoche you should watch "Zorba the Greek". :smile:
Nice.

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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by Grigoris » Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:40 pm

dzogchungpa wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 4:05 pm
It's interesting that this has come up because just this past Sunday I heard Anam Thubten say that if you want to understand Guru Rinpoche you should watch "Zorba the Greek". :smile:
The book is infinitely better. Kazantzakis was an amazing author and his style comes across clearly even in translation.

You know that he wrote a play about the Buddha?

He was basically excommunicated by the Greek Orthodox church for his views.
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde

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dzogchungpa
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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by dzogchungpa » Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:49 pm

Grigoris wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:40 pm
dzogchungpa wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 4:05 pm
It's interesting that this has come up because just this past Sunday I heard Anam Thubten say that if you want to understand Guru Rinpoche you should watch "Zorba the Greek". :smile:
The book is infinitely better. Kazantzakis was an amazing author and his style comes across clearly even in translation.

You know that he wrote a play about the Buddha?

He was basically excommunicated by the Greek Orthodox church for his views.

OK, I'll check out the book. AT seems quite fond of the movie though. :smile:
Just to bring things full circle, I point out this rather interesting work.
There is not only nothingness because there is always, and always can manifest. - Thinley Norbu Rinpoche

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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by Grigoris » Tue Apr 03, 2018 8:03 pm

dzogchungpa wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:49 pm
Grigoris wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:40 pm
dzogchungpa wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 4:05 pm
It's interesting that this has come up because just this past Sunday I heard Anam Thubten say that if you want to understand Guru Rinpoche you should watch "Zorba the Greek". :smile:
The book is infinitely better. Kazantzakis was an amazing author and his style comes across clearly even in translation.

You know that he wrote a play about the Buddha?

He was basically excommunicated by the Greek Orthodox church for his views.

OK, I'll check out the book. AT seems quite fond of the movie though. :smile:
Just to bring things full circle, I point out this rather interesting work.
Maybe this will be the next one I translate into Greek. I finally found somebody to publish my translation of the Milindapanha. Imagine that a book that records the dialogue between an Ancient Hellenic king and a Buddhist monk (a book translated into over 15 languages) does not exist in Greek translation.

Mind you: the story of the "Christian" Saints Barlaam and Josaphat (basically the life story of the Buddha reimagined as a Christian tale) does exist in Greek. But now we are way off topic.

To bring it back to topic: A Buddhist friend of mine met Osho when he landed in Crete whilst fleeing from the U$. She said that for a young Greek girl from a religious and conservative rural community (as most of Crete was back then) Osho's message was quite liberatory.
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde

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dzogchungpa
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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by dzogchungpa » Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:33 pm

Grigoris wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 8:03 pm
A Buddhist friend of mine met Osho when he landed in Crete whilst fleeing from the U$. She said that for a young Greek girl from a religious and conservative rural community (as most of Crete was back then) Osho's message was quite liberatory.

See, wankers aren't necessarily all bad.
There is not only nothingness because there is always, and always can manifest. - Thinley Norbu Rinpoche

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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by DiamondMeru » Thu Apr 05, 2018 1:31 am

Loved the documentary because it seemed like a bunch of naive hippies having fun until Osho’s higher ups started a war on those poor ignorant Christian townsfolk. Then you could tell someone was on a power trip and not concerned with spirituality. I believe the commune was genuinely trying to practice a healthy spirituality but could not see all the red flags.
I think if you look at Osho’s eyes you can see some kind of psychosis, perhaps that why Sheila is currently working with the mentally ill.
I can’t judge but when religiosity causes you to poison and attempt murder, it is not a genuine spiritual path of light but of darkness.

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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by Aryjna » Sat Apr 07, 2018 10:00 am

dzogchungpa wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 4:05 pm
Grigoris wrote:
Tue Apr 03, 2018 8:18 am
dzogchungpa wrote:
Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:43 pm
I haven't read it yet, but it looks like it might be intresting and I just requested it from my library system.
See that's the thing with Osho, he completely lacked any originality, intelligence and credibility so he ripped off other traditions and people, re-branding their original ideas and practices as his own.

Instead of reading "Zorba the Buddha" I would highly recommend reading the book "Zorba the Greek" by the author Nikos Kazantzakis. Kazantzakis is brilliant at weaving together philosophy and fiction. He leant heavily towards mystical existentialism. When Kazantzakis was nominated for the Nobel prize for literature, he lost to Albert Camus by one vote. Camus stated in the periodical "The Philosopher's Magazine" that Kazantzakis deserved the prize "a hundred times more than himself". Kazantzakis was nominated nine times for the Nobel prize for literature.

And along comes Osho and rips him off, shamelessly, just to buy another Rolls Royce (he had 93 of them in total).

Did I mention that Osho was a w*nker? Oh yeah, I did. In the post directly above this one.


It's interesting that this has come up because just this past Sunday I heard Anam Thubten say that if you want to understand Guru Rinpoche you should watch "Zorba the Greek". :smile:

Also, I think you're allowed to write 'wanker'.
I have read the book several times and watched the movie maybe twice, though its been years since the last time. I can't imagine why Zorba would have something to do with Guru Rinpoche but now I'm thinking of reading it again to see if there could be any truth in that.

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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by Anders » Sat Apr 07, 2018 11:58 am

I think Osho has some sort of spiritual awakening, then made the cardinal sin of thinking this was the end of the matter and that all actions of his from there on out were enlightened actions. His own carte Blanche for complete spiritual bypass and utter lack of morality. Quite sad really.
"Even if my body should be burnt to death in the fires of hell
I would endure it for myriad lifetimes
As your companion in practice"

--- Gandavyuha Sutra

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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by boda » Sat Apr 07, 2018 2:07 pm

I think if you look at Osho’s eyes you can see some kind of psychosis, perhaps that why Sheila is currently working with the mentally ill.
??? Sheila was the nuttiest one of all and appeared to have no remorse for her actions. Either sociopathic or arrogant righteousness, if there’s a difference between the two.

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Re: "Wild Wild Country" - Osho documentary on Netflix

Post by philji » Sun Apr 08, 2018 8:21 am

I wonder how the film would pan out if it were about Trungpa and Shambhala in those days.
We would see a group who seemed to play out with militarism, there was sexual abusive activity, there was an adoring group of followers and a charismatic leader who liked dressing up.
Those times...70’s and 80’s dharma and eastern spirituality was still settling in and there were some very wacky things going on.
I feel sorry looking at the film for the townsfolk who were living in fear and also the naive followers who thought they were creating a brave new world.
It is so easy to manipulate people...especially on the spiritual path.

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