Shingon daily practice

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Serenity509
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Shingon daily practice

Post by Serenity509 » Wed Oct 07, 2015 11:06 pm

What is the daily practice for a lay practitioner of Shingon Buddhism? What are the common practices done outside the temple? I appreciate your sharing.

Phyllobius
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Re: Shingon daily practice

Post by Phyllobius » Thu Oct 08, 2015 4:25 pm

Hello,

I'm a practitionner of Buzan-Ha Shingi Shingon. I live very far from my temple, my daily routine is very close the one provided by Shingon.org . I only add the 25th chapter of the myôo renge kyô and Ajikan. The pratice of Jusanbutsu(mantras of the shingon's 13 divinities) is somewhat "problematic", Shingon have to be given by your teacher. Practicing on your own can't be "by the rules". As simple as can these practices seem to be, they are very "deep", so a teacher is of utmost importance to help you sort fact from fiction and avoid to botch your carefull work.

Please bear my bad english.

Phyllobius

Fortyeightvows
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Re: Shingon daily practice

Post by Fortyeightvows » Sun Oct 11, 2015 1:41 am

do you attempt the sanskrit pronouciation of of the mantras? I have visited a few shingon temples and was recently suprised to hear a very japanese pronouciation of several mantras

Phyllobius
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Re: Shingon daily practice

Post by Phyllobius » Mon Oct 12, 2015 1:49 pm

Since my teacher transmitted me the shingon in japanese I use the japanese version. The sanskrit vs japanese is an age old debate.

Serenity509
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Re: Shingon daily practice

Post by Serenity509 » Wed Oct 14, 2015 11:25 pm

I find Shingon devotion to Amida very interesting:
The Mystical Nembutsu of Shingon

The Shingon school is a Japanese form of esoteric Buddhism, similar to the Tantric Buddhism of Tibet. It was the other major school to the Tendai school during Honen’s days. Kakuban (1095-1143) was a famous monk of the Shingon school who developed an esoteric interpretation of the Pure Land teaching. He believed that the central buddha of Shingon devotion, Vairocana Buddha, and Amida Buddha were one and the same and that their pure lands were also one and the same. He once wrote: “Amida is only another name for Vairocana, the great Sun Buddha. If a person will but repeat the three syllables of Amida’s name, his bad karma that has been accumulating from time immemorial will be extinguished. Meditation upon the one Buddha Amida brings endless blessedness and wisdom. Amida is but an intellectual faculty of Vairocana, who is the substance of Amida’s person. Amida’s Pure Land is really everywhere, so that the place where we meditate upon him is verily his own land. When we come to realize the truth of this, we do not need to leave this present fleeting world at all to get to the Pure Land - we are already there. And in our present bodies and persons, just as we are, we are assimilated to Amida, and he to Vairocana, from whom we derive our being. This is the path of meditation by which, just as we are, we attain buddhahood.” This equating of Vairocana and Amida was a radical step within the confines of Shingon doctrine, and as it was done to gain greater popular appeal among the masses, it shows the basic popularity which Pure Land ideas had gained by this time.
http://www.jsri.jp/English/Pureland/DOC ... mbutsu.htm

Phyllobius
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Re: Shingon daily practice

Post by Phyllobius » Mon Oct 19, 2015 12:57 pm

I don't know if there's an "official nenbutsu practice" in Shingon, but the feeling that i gather from frequenting my teacher is that the Shingon worldview is compatible with many many forms of buddhists practices. Until the Edo period there wrerent intersectarian barriers. I've read here: http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/handle/2027.42/111511 that Zen monks came on Kôyasan to practice with Shingon monks. I wonder if informally this happens nowadays.

jake
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Re: Shingon daily practice

Post by jake » Sun Jan 31, 2016 6:20 pm

Serenity509 wrote:What is the daily practice for a lay practitioner of Shingon Buddhism? What are the common practices done outside the temple? I appreciate your sharing.
For what it's worth, I'm trying to get copies of the English version of the Koyasan Shingon-shu daily practice which I understand is appropriate for lay practitioners. I'll let you know when/if I'm successful.

Does anyone know of other Shingon traditions that are making efforts to translate things into English? I know Koyasan Shingon-shu is actively translated a lot of material but don't know about other traditions.
“The white zone is for immediate loading and unloading of passengers only. There is no stopping in the red zone."

Fortyeightvows
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Re: Shingon daily practice

Post by Fortyeightvows » Sun Jan 31, 2016 7:53 pm

jake wrote: For what it's worth, I'm trying to get copies of the English version of the Koyasan Shingon-shu daily practice which I understand is appropriate for lay practitioners. I'll let you know when/if I'm successful.
the shingon daily practice for lay people is:
refuge, precepts, heart sutra, thirteen mantras, light mantra, guru mantra, dedication

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Nyedrag Yeshe
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Re: Shingon daily practice

Post by Nyedrag Yeshe » Thu Jun 23, 2016 1:49 am

jake wrote:
Serenity509 wrote:What is the daily practice for a lay practitioner of Shingon Buddhism? What are the common practices done outside the temple? I appreciate your sharing.
For what it's worth, I'm trying to get copies of the English version of the Koyasan Shingon-shu daily practice which I understand is appropriate for lay practitioners. I'll let you know when/if I'm successful.

Does anyone know of other Shingon traditions that are making efforts to translate things into English? I know Koyasan Shingon-shu is actively translated a lot of material but don't know about other traditions.
Here's the service you want : http://shingon.org/ritual/daily.html :anjali:
“Whatever has to happen, let it happen!”
“Whatever the situation is, it’s fine!”
“I really don’t need anything!
~Tsangpa Gyare Yeshe Dorje (1161-1211)
ओं पद्मोष्णीष विमले हूँ फट । ओं हनुफशभरहृदय स्वाहा॥
འ༔ ཨ༔ ཧ༔ ཤ༔ ས༔ མ༔ ཀརྨ་པ་མཁྱེན་ནོ།

jake
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Re: Shingon daily practice

Post by jake » Thu Jun 23, 2016 9:49 am

Nyedrag Yeshe wrote:
jake wrote:
Serenity509 wrote:What is the daily practice for a lay practitioner of Shingon Buddhism? What are the common practices done outside the temple? I appreciate your sharing.
For what it's worth, I'm trying to get copies of the English version of the Koyasan Shingon-shu daily practice which I understand is appropriate for lay practitioners. I'll let you know when/if I'm successful.

Does anyone know of other Shingon traditions that are making efforts to translate things into English? I know Koyasan Shingon-shu is actively translated a lot of material but don't know about other traditions.
Here's the service you want : http://shingon.org/ritual/daily.html :anjali:
Thanks Nyedrag Yeshe for the link. I believe this link is for a rather old(90s) translation of the Koyasan Shingon-shu lay service. I have a copy of the recent Kongobuji translation which I use. I am still curious if other traditions are translating their works into English, e.g. Buzan-ha or the like?

Thanks again!
“The white zone is for immediate loading and unloading of passengers only. There is no stopping in the red zone."

Matylda
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Re: Shingon daily practice

Post by Matylda » Thu Jun 23, 2016 12:08 pm

Phyllobius wrote:I don't know if there's an "official nenbutsu practice" in Shingon, but the feeling that i gather from frequenting my teacher is that the Shingon worldview is compatible with many many forms of buddhists practices. Until the Edo period there wrerent intersectarian barriers. I've read here: http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/handle/2027.42/111511 that Zen monks came on Kôyasan to practice with Shingon monks. I wonder if informally this happens nowadays.
Yes of course... there are some monks who did it and do it still today. I knew at least a few of them, young and old. But it is worth to mention that it worked also other way round. There were some shingon and tendai monks who went to zen masters and some became zen masters themsleves. Most famous in Japan would be probably Jiun Sonja, who attained satori under soto master Daibai. Jiun sonja influenced very much Sawaki Kodo and making nyoho-e kesa or kashaya, a Buddha's robe which got some popularity among soto zen monks. So there is also a material evidence of his and shingon influence within soto. Some soto monks buy and wear directly shingon nyoho-e today But also during times of Keizan zenji there were many shingon monks who practice zen. So within zen, both soto and rinzai are some shingon practices which were imported by them to zen monasteries. It happned already at the very beginning of zen tradition in Japan.

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Nyedrag Yeshe
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Re: Shingon daily practice

Post by Nyedrag Yeshe » Thu Jun 23, 2016 4:17 pm

jake wrote:
Nyedrag Yeshe wrote:
jake wrote:
For what it's worth, I'm trying to get copies of the English version of the Koyasan Shingon-shu daily practice which I understand is appropriate for lay practitioners. I'll let you know when/if I'm successful.

Does anyone know of other Shingon traditions that are making efforts to translate things into English? I know Koyasan Shingon-shu is actively translated a lot of material but don't know about other traditions.
Here's the service you want : http://shingon.org/ritual/daily.html :anjali:
Thanks Nyedrag Yeshe for the link. I believe this link is for a rather old(90s) translation of the Koyasan Shingon-shu lay service. I have a copy of the recent Kongobuji translation which I use. I am still curious if other traditions are translating their works into English, e.g. Buzan-ha or the like?

Thanks again!
Somotimes I recite this japanese version that belongs to Chisan-ha. The only difference I see is that they don't recite the 13 Buddhas's mantras, just the light dharani. Also they include besides the invocation to Kobo Daishi, invocations to two of their lineage master, Kogyo Daishi. And also a dedication to the deceased. Also the confession prayer at the beginning and they ommit the prostration mantra. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rV6Wbj0wT2A
“Whatever has to happen, let it happen!”
“Whatever the situation is, it’s fine!”
“I really don’t need anything!
~Tsangpa Gyare Yeshe Dorje (1161-1211)
ओं पद्मोष्णीष विमले हूँ फट । ओं हनुफशभरहृदय स्वाहा॥
འ༔ ཨ༔ ཧ༔ ཤ༔ ས༔ མ༔ ཀརྨ་པ་མཁྱེན་ནོ།

jake
Posts: 116
Joined: Tue Feb 22, 2011 3:13 pm

Re: Shingon daily practice

Post by jake » Wed Aug 24, 2016 2:27 am

jake wrote:For what it's worth, I'm trying to get copies of the English version of the Koyasan Shingon-shu daily practice which I understand is appropriate for lay practitioners.
If anyone is interested, the Koyasan Shingon Lay Service Books have arrived. It was published in 2012 by the Education Department of the Head Temple of Koyasan Shingon-Shu and Translated by Eijo Dreitlein. This book presents everything in Japanese, Romaji, and English translation with Mantra in Siddham script.

The contents include:
• Sanshinjo –(Three articles of faith)
• Go Komoku –(Five Core Teachings)
Butsuzen Gongyo Shidai
• Gassho Raihai –(Prostrate to the Buddha)
• Sange –(Repentence)
• Sanki –(The Triple Refuge)
• Sankyo –(Completion of the Triple Refuge)
• Juzen-Kai –(Ten Guides to Wholesome Conduct)
• Hotsu-bodaishin –(Raise Bodhicitta)
• Sanmaya-kai –(The Samaya Vow)
• Kaikyo-ge –(Verse on Opening a Sutra)
• Hannya Shingyo –(Heart Sutra)
• Honzon Shingon –(Mantra of the Main Deity) [The mantra of the main deity of your temple, not listed here]
• Jusan-butsu Shingon –(Mantras of Thirteen Deities)
• Komyo Shingon –(The Light Mantra)
• Go-Hogo –(Precious Name of Kobo Daishi)
• Kigan-mon –(Prayer)
• Eko –(Dedication)
• Kobo Daishi Wasan –(Song of Kobo Daishi)
• Kannon-gyo-ge –(Verse Section of Avalokitesvara Sutra)
• Shari-rai –(Honoring the Sarira Relics)
• Go-Hogo Nenju Shidai –(Service for chanting the name of Kobo Daishi)
• Jikiji-saho –(Mealtime service)
• Shingon Anjin Wasan (appendix 1) –(Song of the Shingon Assurance of Liberation)
• Komyo Shingon Wasan (appendix) –(Song of the Light Mantra)

Let me know if you have any questions.

Jake
“The white zone is for immediate loading and unloading of passengers only. There is no stopping in the red zone."

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