Letting go

Mirror
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Letting go

Post by Mirror » Mon Sep 30, 2019 9:38 am

Hello, I know that to know how to let go is one of the most important things on the Buddhist path. So please tell me, what does it mean to let go? How to let go? Does it mean someting like, that you don't care about the result (when you recognize that you're thinking, you just don't care if you are still thinking or not - something like that?)? I'll be glad for everything. Thanks a lot!

Simon E.
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Re: Letting go

Post by Simon E. » Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:00 am

I think we need to look at whether “letting go” IS one of the most important things on the Buddhist path.
I think that depends on what is meant by letting go.
If it means just surrendering all ambition or not caring about the consequences of our actions then I think that’s a 1960’s hippy type of misunderstanding of Buddhism.
If on the other hand we mean doing our best at work and relationships and in our meditation practise to be centred and compassionate and then being prepared to be patient with the results of that whatever they are, then letting go in that sense might be useful. But it’s not about being passive or dropping out.
“The difference between us and Tara is that she knows she doesn’t exist”.

Mirror
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Re: Letting go

Post by Mirror » Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:23 am

Simon E. wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:00 am
I think we need to look at whether “letting go” IS one of the most important things on the Buddhist path.
I think that depends on what is meant by letting go.
If it means just surrendering all ambition or not caring about the consequences of our actions then I think that’s a 1960’s hippy type of misunderstanding of Buddhism.
If on the other hand we mean doing our best at work and relationships and in our meditation practise to be centred and compassionate and then being prepared to be patient with the results of that whatever they are, then letting go in that sense might be useful. But it’s not about being passive or dropping out.
No, I didn't mean that like hippies did. I just don't understand, what does it mean. When thoughts arise in my mind and I should let them go, I don't know what to do with them.

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Re: Letting go

Post by Simon E. » Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:55 am

It’s a phrase you won’t hear used much by actual Buddhists teachers Mirror. It’s more the kind of thing that non Buddhists think that Buddhists say.

When thoughts arise you can see them being like clouds arising in a clear sky, or ripples in a stream. Just be aware of them and then get on with what needs doing, or just relaxing or whatever. Don’t try to stop thoughts, that just complicates things. Just watch them arise and then..wait for it..let them go. :smile:
“The difference between us and Tara is that she knows she doesn’t exist”.

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Astus
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Re: Letting go

Post by Astus » Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:59 am

Mirror wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 9:38 am
what does it mean to let go? How to let go?
To let go means to be without craving and attachment. Craving and attachment arises because of the misconception that the perceived object is desirable. You may also say that to take things personally is the root of clinging. Recognising that there is nothing desirable in an object, that there is nothing personal present, is when the cause of craving and attachment is removed. For example, to realise that what looks beautiful does so only because of the added conception that it is beautiful, then there is nothing in the object itself that is beautiful, while the thought of beauty is itself fictional, then there is nothing left to be attracted to. Practically speaking, one has to cultivate mindfulness of the six sense doors to see first hand how feelings can mislead the mind.
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

Mirror
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Re: Letting go

Post by Mirror » Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:29 am

Astus wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:59 am
Mirror wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 9:38 am
what does it mean to let go? How to let go?
To let go means to be without craving and attachment. Craving and attachment arises because of the misconception that the perceived object is desirable. You may also say that to take things personally is the root of clinging. Recognising that there is nothing desirable in an object, that there is nothing personal present, is when the cause of craving and attachment is removed. For example, to realise that what looks beautiful does so only because of the added conception that it is beautiful, then there is nothing in the object itself that is beautiful, while the thought of beauty is itself fictional, then there is nothing left to be attracted to. Practically speaking, one has to cultivate mindfulness of the six sense doors to see first hand how feelings can mislead the mind.
Thank you very much! It really helped. Maybe I'll try looking for a teacher and asking him. Thanks a lot!

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KeithA
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Re: Letting go

Post by KeithA » Mon Sep 30, 2019 6:42 pm

This may help: Gllding the Lily

I wouldn’t dare post this response anywhere else in the forum. But, since we are in the Zen forum, it’s okay.

Good luck!

_/|\_
You make, you get.

New Haven Zen Center

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LastLegend
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Re: Letting go

Post by LastLegend » Mon Sep 30, 2019 7:17 pm

I don’t even know what let go means. I guess drop all mental act all together and just be in that awareness that doesn’t act!

:lol:

Great question!
Make personal vows.

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Könchok Thrinley
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Re: Letting go

Post by Könchok Thrinley » Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:51 pm

I am surprised and rather disappointed that nobody has posted this already. Shame on you guys.



As for letting go... some things come easier with practice. We may get an instruction from strangers on the internet, but what worth is there? The best is when teacher you have a relationship with explains it as there is blessings of the lineage present. Or if you practice you might understand it more easily with time and with your intuition/wisdom developing.
“Observing samaya involves to remain inseparable from the union of wisdom and compassion at all times, to sustain mindfulness, and to put into practice the guru’s instructions”. Garchen Rinpoche

Formerly known as Miroku.

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Johnny Dangerous
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Re: Letting go

Post by Johnny Dangerous » Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:50 pm

It's more a self-help slogan than a specifically Buddhist one, but there's some resonance.

I'd compare it to moving beyond hope and fear.

You can't actually try to let go of anything though, the only actual letting go is acceptance - including of the contents of one's own mind.
"...if you think about how many hours, months and years of your life you've spent looking at things, being fascinated by things that have now passed away, then how wonderful to spend even five minutes looking into the nature of your own mind."

-James Low

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LastLegend
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Re: Letting go

Post by LastLegend » Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:19 am

Johnny Dangerous wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:50 pm
It's more a self-help slogan than a specifically Buddhist one, but there's some resonance.

I'd compare it to moving beyond hope and fear.

You can't actually try to let go of anything though, the only actual letting go is acceptance - including of the contents of one's own mind.
Very nice last paragraph!
Make personal vows.

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LastLegend
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Re: Letting go

Post by LastLegend » Tue Oct 01, 2019 1:32 am

Miroku wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:51 pm
I am surprised and rather disappointed that nobody has posted this already. Shame on you guys.



As for letting go... some things come easier with practice. We may get an instruction from strangers on the internet, but what worth is there? The best is when teacher you have a relationship with explains it as there is blessings of the lineage present. Or if you practice you might understand it more easily with time and with your intuition/wisdom developing.
:bow:
Make personal vows.

SteRo
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Re: Letting go

Post by SteRo » Tue Oct 01, 2019 9:35 am

Mirror wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 9:38 am
Hello, I know that to know how to let go is one of the most important things on the Buddhist path. ...
Depends. Considering that the Buddhist path is the Eightfold Path as far as I know the most important thing is to let go of: wrong view, wrong intention, wrong speech, wrong action, wrong livelihood, wrong effort, wrong mindfulness and wrong concentration.
Mirror wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 9:38 am
So please tell me, what does it mean to let go? How to let go?
Referring to the above the Buddha advised to practice right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness and right concentration.

:namaste:

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Astus
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Re: Letting go

Post by Astus » Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:13 pm

Johnny Dangerous wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:50 pm
It's more a self-help slogan than a specifically Buddhist one
Check out this Pali term: vossagga.
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

Simon E.
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Re: Letting go

Post by Simon E. » Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:26 pm

Astus wrote:
Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:13 pm
Johnny Dangerous wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:50 pm
It's more a self-help slogan than a specifically Buddhist one
Check out this Pali term: vossagga.
That is technically correct, but in populist use ‘letting go’ is often an endorsement of fecklessness. Not the structured and responsible stepping back from engagement outlined in the article. Although I have to say the idea that husbands have the authority and kindly hand it over to their wives, is rather quaint...try telling most younger Brit wives that..🤔
“The difference between us and Tara is that she knows she doesn’t exist”.

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KeithA
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Re: Letting go

Post by KeithA » Tue Oct 01, 2019 1:16 pm

Astus wrote:
Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:13 pm
Johnny Dangerous wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:50 pm
It's more a self-help slogan than a specifically Buddhist one
Check out this Pali term: vossagga.
Thanks for that. “Letting go” is hardly a self help term, as far as Zen practice goes.

Just ask the man on top of the 100 foot pole (case 46, Mumonkan)

_/|\_
You make, you get.

New Haven Zen Center

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KeithA
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Re: Letting go

Post by KeithA » Tue Oct 01, 2019 1:20 pm

Miroku wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:51 pm
I am surprised and rather disappointed that nobody has posted this already. Shame on you guys.



As for letting go... some things come easier with practice. We may get an instruction from strangers on the internet, but what worth is there? The best is when teacher you have a relationship with explains it as there is blessings of the lineage present. Or if you practice you might understand it more easily with time and with your intuition/wisdom developing.
Maybe it wasn’t shared because to do so would make light of something that is actually quite serious.

_/|\_
You make, you get.

New Haven Zen Center

Simon E.
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Re: Letting go

Post by Simon E. » Tue Oct 01, 2019 3:32 pm

KeithA wrote:
Tue Oct 01, 2019 1:16 pm
Astus wrote:
Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:13 pm
Johnny Dangerous wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:50 pm
It's more a self-help slogan than a specifically Buddhist one
Check out this Pali term: vossagga.
Thanks for that. “Letting go” is hardly a self help term, as far as Zen practice goes.

Just ask the man on top of the 100 foot pole (case 46, Mumonkan)

_/|\_
I love the way that You Zen guys drop an expression or quote as though it is self explanatory.. :smile: Which it probably is if you are immersed in Zen stuff for a time. But for poor saps like me the idea of asking the guy at the top of a hundred foot pole sheds very little light on the issue.
But then again I dropped into Zen forum of my own choice, and Vajrayanists have their own shibboleths.
“The difference between us and Tara is that she knows she doesn’t exist”.

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LastLegend
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Re: Letting go

Post by LastLegend » Tue Oct 01, 2019 5:07 pm

I don’t know but I was told a man on top of the 100 ft pole would need to fall hard to die a “Great Death” as when traces or ignorance dissolves.
Make personal vows.

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Johnny Dangerous
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Re: Letting go

Post by Johnny Dangerous » Tue Oct 01, 2019 5:43 pm

Astus wrote:
Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:13 pm
Johnny Dangerous wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:50 pm
It's more a self-help slogan than a specifically Buddhist one
Check out this Pali term: vossagga.
That's interesting, thanks for posting this.. I was unfamiliar with the term. Still, it seems different in tone to me from what "letting go" usually connotes in modern vernacular. But IDK, maybe it's closer than I think.
"...if you think about how many hours, months and years of your life you've spent looking at things, being fascinated by things that have now passed away, then how wonderful to spend even five minutes looking into the nature of your own mind."

-James Low

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