The role of compassion

General discussion, particularly exploring the Dharma in the modern world.
[N.B. This is the forum that was called ‘Exploring Buddhism’. The new name simply describes it better.]
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LastLegend
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Re: The role of compassion

Post by LastLegend »

Kaore wrote:
LastLegend wrote:Are you certain of your own experience?
yes, doubt is terrible, I know what it is.
How do you know you have no doubt?
Make personal vows.

End of the day: I don’t know.
Jesse
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Re: The role of compassion

Post by Jesse »

LastLegend wrote:
Kaore wrote:
LastLegend wrote:Are you certain of your own experience?
yes, doubt is terrible, I know what it is.
How do you know you have no doubt?
I have lot's of doubt! The one thing I no longer doubt is that I want to put an end to suffering. At the very least it feels good to be sure of that, once you are you can pour all your effort into it...
The cost of a thing is the amount of what I call life which is required to be exchanged for it, immediately or in the long run.
-Henry David Thoreau
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Kaore
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Re: The role of compassion

Post by Kaore »

LastLegend wrote:How do you know you have no doubt?
you just know it simple, how? By being satisfied always.
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LastLegend
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Re: The role of compassion

Post by LastLegend »

Don't say it too soon.

Take care.
Make personal vows.

End of the day: I don’t know.
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Kaore
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Re: The role of compassion

Post by Kaore »

LastLegend wrote:Don't say it too soon.

Take care.
Take care
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Dan74
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Re: The role of compassion

Post by Dan74 »

Jesse wrote:What is the role of compassion in spirituality? Is it simply a by-product? Is it the main purpose? Can we even experience spiritual growth without compassion?

In Buddhism the main 'goal', or whatever you want to call it, is realizing Sunyata.. I am curious how the realization of Sunyata results in great compassion?

One thing I have found out the hard way is, without compassion in your heart you can't even begin to see reality for what it is. Why is this?

Just thinking', anyone's input is welcome. :namaste:
Yes, I agree. Compassion is vital. There is the fantastic Jataka tale of Shakyamuni in his previous birth sacrificing his body to feed a hungry sick tigress and save her and her cubs from death.

http://www.ancient-buddhist-texts.net/E ... igress.htm

There is also the wonderful story of Asanga seeking Maitreya and not finding him after years of meditating and practice in the mountains. Until one day he saw a maggot-ridden old dog dragging its diseased body along a dusty road. He bent low and proceeded to remove the maggots, first with his fingers, then the tongue in order not to hurt the animal. Suddenly the dog transformed into Maitreya! Maitreya asked him to put him on his shoulders and take him to town. But in town no one saw him. Only an old woman saw the old dog, everyone else saw nothing.

http://aumamen.com/story/maitreya-appears-to-asanga

There are wonderful practices to develop loving kindness and compassion like Metta-bhavana and Tonglen. But applying many basic Dharma we begin to realise how interconnected we all are. How everyone is doing their best in their way. Everyone suffers. Everyone is thirsting for happiness and freedom. As anger and neediness subside, it becomes easier to accept people as they are and feel compassion for them. I guess one of the best practices is letting go. Once the garbage is gone, the heart opens. But it can open before too! That's why practicing Paramitas is so important. Whether in voluneering to help those less fortunate or giving 100% in whatever your do, this is vital both to keep the right perspective on practice and to benefit other beings. Last, but not least of course, we have our Bodhisattva Vows. "Sentient beings are numberless. I vow to liberate them all." This is compassion 101 right there in our Vows. So yes, compassion is fundamental. Sadly it is not mentioned very often and seen even less.
Jesse
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Re: The role of compassion

Post by Jesse »

But applying many basic Dharma we begin to realise how interconnected we all are. How everyone is doing their best in their way. Everyone suffers. Everyone is thirsting for happiness and freedom. As anger and neediness subside, it becomes easier to accept people as they are and feel compassion for them. I guess one of the best practices is letting go
.

I agree. Its way too easy to get caught up in philosophy and what not and forget the basics which tend to do so much more to alleviate suffering.
The cost of a thing is the amount of what I call life which is required to be exchanged for it, immediately or in the long run.
-Henry David Thoreau
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garudha
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Re: The role of compassion

Post by garudha »

In this underwater world, sea of compassion,
Existing as an empty bubble, alone I drift,
Seeing other bubbles, greedy I become,
Drunk on toxic air, I desire more and more,
Tortured beast, of compassion I know not,
Until I cry, and feel the water once more.
Alfredo
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Re: The role of compassion

Post by Alfredo »

Realization of sunyata means direct perception of the lack of any permanent self, and consequently, the interdependence of all things. With self-cherishing revealed as foolishness, compassion for all sentient beings becomes the logical consequence.
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