The little thread of big Self-Admonishments

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Vasana
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The little thread of big Self-Admonishments

Post by Vasana » Fri Oct 13, 2017 10:13 am

As the title says - a collection of self-admonishments. Feel free to add any you know of.

Outside and inside ~ Dudjom Rinpoche
"I recognize that the ultimate teaching of sutra and tantra
Is emptiness, but can’t make use of that recognition;

My mindstream stays hard as horn.
When I practice remaining in mind’s true condition
I am without stability,
yet I mouth off about the profound view
And toss cause and effect to the winds.
On the outside — I can give a show of good behaviour;
On the inside — desire, attachment, greed rage like fire."
"The changing cycle of joy and sorrow, like the changing seasons –
As a time of suffering will surely come around to me,
May I truly practice the sublime teachings."
- Dudjom Rinpoche

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Vasana
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Re: The little thread of big Self-Admonishments

Post by Vasana » Fri Oct 13, 2017 10:16 am

Advice to Myself by Jamyang Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö (1893 - 1959)

'Kyeho! O Wonder!
Simply to hear your name tears the cycle of conditioned existence apart,
Merely to think of you brings the greatest of good fortune,
My sole, ever-lasting refuge, glorious supreme lama—
May we remain inseparable, as you dwell joyously in the blossom of my heart!

Listen, Lodrö, you who are so smart and sensible!
Right now, you might consider yourself young,
But, with a wicked mind intent upon your own wellbeing,
The daylight of your life will soon succumb to shadows.

Although you’ve met many authentic masters,
And received a few teachings on sūtra and tantra,
Your character remains as tough and rigid as stone,
Yet still you think you’re improving—how gullible you must be!

Whilst well-aware of the boundaries of the three vows,
With self-destructive, self-defeating thoughts and deeds,
You strive to bring about the sufferings of the hells!

Careless one! Put your hands to your heart and think:
These plans for the future, based upon a denial of death,
Undermine the real purpose of this and future lives,
And the enemy, Yama, will only catch you in his noose—think hard!

When you’re caught in the passage from this life,
There’ll be no way to bear the pain and the sorrow,
And all will be an unending river of tears—
Bring this to mind and your heart will surely falter.

Now, with these freedoms and advantages, you have a support for practice—a unique opportunity!
Rather than squander such an invaluable moment,
Why not strive to accomplish the goal of lasting happiness?
Consider!

The bloom of a handsome youthful body withers with age.
Despite your wishes, you’ll experience the pain of disease,
And, with a final rasping cough, you’ll pass away. 
Even now, the time for this draws near.

Son, Lodrö, think about it well!
The blazing iron balls of undeserved offerings
Will sever the life-force of liberation—reflect upon it!
When molten bronze is running down your throat,
Will you savour its taste? Consider it now!

Though immature, you pretend to work for others’ good;
It’s like the blind leading the blind—
Why not just stop fooling yourself and everybody else?
Simply to remember your father is sufficient, the king of all practices.

When praying to the noble lama with intense devotion,
You, son, find all your concerns transformed into Dharma—
O lama, only father of mine, guide me along the path!
Precious teacher, possessor of the wisdoms and kāyas,
To look upon you now would fill me with such joy!
Yet with my impure perception and my wicked karma,
I have no chance to meet you, dear father lama!

When this son of yours has purified his perceptions, 
He’ll discover the lama of unaltered rigpa-awareness,
And from that experience, there’ll be no separation—
Bringing this to mind, what joy! What bliss there is! 

O lama, healer of your son’s ills, remain!
For however long I have left to live, 
May I be devoted to the Dharma from the very core of my being,
And may whatever I do, say or think,
Be directed only to beings’ good,
Never entangled in selfish desires!

May I set out upon the path to liberation,
And, mounting the steed of bodhicitta,
May I lead all beings to happiness!


On the plaine of Burdom in Lhogyü, Chökyi Lodrö made this aspiration on the Chötri Thang in front of Mount Senge Yangbe.
Last edited by Vasana on Fri Oct 13, 2017 10:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
"The changing cycle of joy and sorrow, like the changing seasons –
As a time of suffering will surely come around to me,
May I truly practice the sublime teachings."
- Dudjom Rinpoche

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Vasana
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Re: The little thread of big Self-Admonishments

Post by Vasana » Fri Oct 13, 2017 10:22 am

Advice to myself - Patrul Rinpoche

Vajrasattva, sole deity, Master,
You sit on a full-moon lotus-cushion of  white light
In the hundred-petalled full bloom of youth.
Think of me, Vajrasattva,
You who remain unmoved within the manifest display
That is Mahamudra, pure bliss-emptiness.

Listen up, old bad-karma Patrul,
You dweller-in-distraction.
For ages now you've been
Beguiled, entranced, and fooled by appearances.
Are you aware of that? Are you?

Right this very instant, when you're
Under the spell of mistaken perception
You've got to watch out.
Don't let yourself get carried away by this fake 
    and empty life.
Your mind is spinning around
About carrying out a lot of useless projects:
It's a waste! Give it up!

Thinking about the hundred plans you want to accomplish,
With never enough time to finish them,
Just weighs down your mind.
You're completely distracted
By all these projects, which never come to an end,
But keep spreading out more, like ripples in water.
Don't be a fool: for once, just sit tight.

Listening to the teachings — you've already
    heard hundreds of teachings,
But when you haven't grasped the meaning of even 
   one teaching,
What's the point of more listening?
Reflecting on the teachings — even though you've listened,
If the teachings aren't coming to mind when needed,
What's the point of more reflection? None.

Meditating according to the teachings —
If your meditation practice still isn't curing
The obscuring states of mind—forget about it!
You've added up just how many mantras you've done —
But you aren't accomplishing the kyerim visualization.
You may get the forms of deities nice and clear —
But you're not putting an end to subject and object.

You may tame what appear to be evil spirits and ghosts,
But you're not training the stream of your own mind.

Your four fine sessions of sadhana practice,
So meticulously arranged —
Forget about them.

When you're in a good mood,
Your practice seems to have lots of clarity —
But you just can't relax into it.

When you're depressed,
Your practice is stable enough
But there's no brilliance to it.

As for awareness,
You try to force yourself into a rigpa-like state,
As if stabbing a stake into a target!

Giving high-sounding lectures
Doesn't do your mind-stream any good.
The path of analytical reasoning is precise and acute —
But it's just more delusion, good for nothing goat-shit.

The oral instructions are very profound
But not if you don't put them into practice.
Reading over and over those dharma texts
That just occupy your mind and make your eyes sore —
Forget about it!

You beat your little damaru drum — ting, ting —
And your audience thinks it's charming to hear.
You're reciting words about offering up your body,
But you still haven't stopped holding it dear.
You're making your little cymbals go cling, cling —
Without keeping the ultimate purpose in mind.

All this dharma-practice equipment
That seems so attractive —
Forget about it!

Right now, those students are all studying so very hard,
But in the end, they can't keep it up.
Today, they seem to get the idea,
But later on, there's not a trace left.
Even if one of them manages to learn a little,
He rarely applies his "learning" to his own conduct.

Those elegant dharma disciplines —
Forget about them!
This year, he really cares about you,
Next year, it's not like that.
At first, he seems modest,
Then he grows exalted and pompous.
The more you nurture and cherish him,
The more distant he grows.
These dear friends
Who show such smiling faces to begin with —
Forget about them!

Her smile seems so full of joy —
But who knows if that's really the case?
One time, it's pure pleasure,
Then it's nine months of mental pain.
It might be fine for a month,
But sooner or later, there's trouble.
People teasing; your mind embroiled —
Your lady-friend —
Forget about her!

These endless rounds of conversation
Are just attachment and aversion —
It's just more goat-shit, good for nothing at all.
At the time it seems marvellously entertaining,
But really, you're just spreading around stories
     about other people's mistakes.

Your audience seems to be listening politely,
But then they grow embarrassed for you.
Useless talk that just make you thirsty —
Forget about it!

Giving teachings on meditation texts
Without yourself having
Gained actual experience through practice,
Is like reciting a dance-manual out loud
And thinking that's the same as actually dancing.

People may be listening to you with devotion,
But it just isn't the real thing.
Sooner or later, when your own actions
Contradict the teachings, you'll feel ashamed.
Just mouthing the words,
Giving dharma explanations that sound so eloquent—
Forget about it!

When you don't have a text, you long for it;
Then when you've finally gotten it,
you hardly look at it.
The number of pages seems few enough,
But it's a bit hard to find time to copy them all.
Even if you copied down all the dharma texts on earth,
You wouldn't be satisfied.
Copying down texts is a waste of time
(Unless you get paid) —
So forget about it!

Today, they're happy as clams —
Tomorrow, they're furious.
With all their black moods and white moods,
People are never satisfied.
Or even if they're nice enough,
They may not come through when you really need them,
Disappointing you even more.
All this politeness, keeping up a
Courteous demeanor —
Forget about it!

Worldly and religious work
Is the province of gentlemen.
Patrul, old boy — that's not for you.
Haven't you noticed what always happens?
An old bull, once you've gone to the trouble of 
    borrowing him for his services,
Seems to have absolutely no desire left in him at all—
(Except to go back to sleep).
Be like that — desireless.
Just sleep, eat, piss, shit.
There's nothing else in life that has to be done.
Don't get involved with other things:
They're not the point.
Keep a low profile,
Sleep.
In the triple universe
When you're lower than your company
You should take the low seat.
Should you happen to be the superior one,
Don't get arrogant.

There's no absolute need to have close friends;
You're better off just keeping to yourself.
When you're without any worldly 
   or religious obligations,
Don't keep on longing to acquire some!
If you let go of everything —
Everything, everything —
That's the real point!'

 
'This advice was written by the practitioner Trime Lodro (Patrul Rinpoche) for his intimate friend Ahu Shri (Patrul Rinpoche), in order to give advice that is tailored exactly to his capacities.
This advice should be put into practice!
Even though you don't know how to practice, just let go of everything — that's what I really want to say. Even though you aren't able to succeed in your dharma practice, don't get angry.
May it be virtuous.
Patrul Rinpoche (1808-1887) was the wandering turn-of-the-century Dzogchen master of Eastern Tibet, beloved by the people. He was renowned as the enlightened vagabond.
Translation by Constance Wilkinson '
"The changing cycle of joy and sorrow, like the changing seasons –
As a time of suffering will surely come around to me,
May I truly practice the sublime teachings."
- Dudjom Rinpoche

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Vasana
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Re: The little thread of big Self-Admonishments

Post by Vasana » Fri Oct 13, 2017 10:27 am

Self-Admonishment from The Autobiography of Jamgon Kongtrul Lodro Thaye (1813-1900)

Guru Padmakara, renowned one of the human world, venerable chosen deity Tara,
dakinis and dharmapalas without exception, united as one in the venerable Pema Nyinje:
dwell in the center of my heart until my enlightenment!
Bestow the attainment of simultaneous realization and liberation!
Grant your blessings that I may lead beings equal to space!
Through positive acts and their equally positive results
I have attained a human birth and met the Buddhist teachings.

Hoverer, I must further my aspirations:
for I was born in a border land, the country of Bon.
Though I have studied much in all the fields of learning,
I lack the intellect to reach the height of wisdom.
While I wish to teach and to debate, my acumen is slight.
I have received the three vows in their entirety,
yet faults and failings, large and small, are like falling rain.
My confessions and confirmations of my vows are not authentic.

Although I talk a lot of practice and of meditation,
I have not reached the end of indications of success;
my feelings of confidence are a barren woman's son.

Reinforced and nurtured from beginningless time,
perverse thoughts spring up like gardens in the summertime.
Practice languishes in a lack of effort,
while the ten nonvirtuous actions happen automatically.
Positive qualities are scarcer than a rabbit's horns.
Such is the story of a mortal such as I,
whose behaviour is not that of a holy one
but a sham who makes what is not spiritual seem as though it were.

Even though this is the case, by the power of the Three Roots
from an early age my mind has inclined to virtue.
Casting aside the way of Bon, I have entered the door of the Buddhist teachings.
Nowadays, dissatisfied with my practice in view and action,
I aspire to follow after those of yore.
I have read the many commentaries in an unbiased way,
and examined the biographies of many learned and accomplished ones.
I cannot abide even seeing books
by those sectarians who chase after fame,
for speaking judgementally is the way of fools.
Knowing this, I have savoured the flavor of things in the cave of
enlightened intent
of the new and old schools without prejudice.
I have practiced pure view For all the Victorious One's teachings.
Rejecting the Buddhist teachings's' is a heavy burden which I have no wish to carry.
[...]
While I have not had the good fortune to practice
the profound view and action of sutra and tantra,
I have no doubts or hesitation about these;
and though I have not received transmission
of the various traditions of Buddhism, profound and vast,
yet I have no cynical thoughts that I have no need of them.
I am not able immediately to accomplish
the vast import of the tantras, scriptures and specific instructions,
but I am not discouraged or thinking of quitting in despair.
While I have not understood these meanings all at once,
I do not think of giving up, for I have the intelligence capable of gradual realization.
Having seen the crux of the Victorious One's skillful methods,
I do not have the nerve to advance my own opinions recklessly,
saying. "This is truth, the rest is stupidity."
Since I have not hidden my mind from myself,
I know that I am not some exalted person,
yet while I must be considered an ordinary mortal,
I still take pride in being in accord with the Buddhist teachings to some extent.

In this retreat, in accord with the teachings, casting off useless activity,
I will apply myself with vigor: I will not die with regret!
Without encouragement from others, this attitude that will not be denied
has been with me from a very early age.

When engaged in nothing but distraction and what is not spiritual,
day and night my lifetime is ground away
as span and force of life grow smaller,
and all my friends, companions, attendants, students, monks and laity,
appall me at the way we drag each other down,
finding blame with one another—
have I any understanding or realization of the Buddhist teachings?
Do I act in the slightest in accord with teachings, guilelessly?
Though I have not the least depth of experience or realization,
I eat and wear only what is misappropriated from those living or dead.
Even now, I sell the sacred teachings, gathering possessions
through empowerments, oral transmissions, and instructions.
Furthermore, those acts of Mara of which the Victorious One
spoke in many ways Come effortlessly to hand;
like a deer that has run into a snare,
my mind is pained with fear, anxiety and regret.

As I wonder what to do and what is best,
like a widow grieving for her husband dead and gone,
will former karma and present circumstances cause
some virulent disease, impossible to treat,
and shall I die tonight? or tomorrow early?
Helplessness and impermanence have become my teachers, encouraging me to take heed.

As a bird which is ready to take flight is swiftly stirred by the wind,
is not this preparation to soon go into solitude
an excellent presage for gaining the accomplishment of my chosen deity?
"The changing cycle of joy and sorrow, like the changing seasons –
As a time of suffering will surely come around to me,
May I truly practice the sublime teachings."
- Dudjom Rinpoche

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Rick
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Re: The little thread of big Self-Admonishments

Post by Rick » Fri Oct 13, 2017 5:28 pm

Not an admonishment per se, but a set of potent instructions which, if understood and followed, pretty much burns away all the dross and homes you into a state of pure shining awareness:

Tilopa's Six Advices

No past
No future
No present
No analysis
No control
Rest (alertly)
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily ...

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dzogchungpa
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Re: The little thread of big Self-Admonishments

Post by dzogchungpa » Fri Oct 13, 2017 7:47 pm

Vasana wrote:
Fri Oct 13, 2017 10:13 am
As the title says - a collection of self-admonishments. Feel free to add any you know of.

Outside and inside ~ Dudjom Rinpoche
"I recognize that the ultimate teaching of sutra and tantra
Is emptiness, but can’t make use of that recognition;

My mindstream stays hard as horn.
When I practice remaining in mind’s true condition
I am without stability,
yet I mouth off about the profound view
And toss cause and effect to the winds.
On the outside — I can give a show of good behaviour;
On the inside — desire, attachment, greed rage like fire."

This appears to be the full version that the above is from:
http://welcomingbuddhist.org/archives/1569


Also, the following from ChNN is not exactly a self-admonishment but it seems relevant to the topic:
http://melong.com/twenty-seven-commitme ... hai-norbu/
If you focus on an object, you are not meditating. - Dudjom Rinpoche

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Vasana
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Re: The little thread of big Self-Admonishments

Post by Vasana » Sat Oct 14, 2017 10:20 am

Thanks Dzogchungpa - I was searching for the whole thing originally as I remembered Dudjom Rinpoche's writing was urged on by a Dakini but couldn't find it. Will repost in full.

"It is hard to see one’s own faults.
So, pointing them out to oneself Is a crucial instruction. In the end, when faults are, one by one, removed
Enlightened qualities increase and shine forth.


:thumbsup:

And yep, CHNN's 27 commitments loosely fits the overall atmosphere of an admonishment.
Last edited by Vasana on Sat Oct 14, 2017 10:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
"The changing cycle of joy and sorrow, like the changing seasons –
As a time of suffering will surely come around to me,
May I truly practice the sublime teachings."
- Dudjom Rinpoche

User avatar
Vasana
Posts: 1360
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2013 11:22 am

Re: The little thread of big Self-Admonishments

Post by Vasana » Sat Oct 14, 2017 10:22 am

A Prayer To Recognize my Own Faults and Keep in Mind the Objects of Refuge,
by Kyabje Dudjom Rinpoche.

I pay homage to the guru. Shakyamuni, Victorious One. Supreme guide of the realm for this fortunate aeon, Sons of the Victorious one, assembly of noble Bodhisattvas who tame sentient beings,

Lord guru, matchless savior of beings in the dark age, The three Roots and oath-bound Dharma guardians
Again and again, I ask from my heart, Recalling you with longing and one-pointed mind Please turn your attention toward me. Take hold of me with your lovingkindness and with the power of your unhindered compassion.

Grant your blessings that my thoughts and aims be carried out in accord with Dharma. Through past acts, not without merit, I have obtained this precious human birth. Through past merit, not slight,
I have met the sublime Dharma. 
Accepted by the guru,I was able to obtain empowerments,
Blessings, and the essential instructions All this wealth I now hold in my hands.

But my mind, like a babbling monkey, falls under the sway,Of the enticing, deceptive demon of distraction
And I can not take advantage of the wealth that is my own. Thus, this free, well-favored human birth
And the lama’s teaching are both wasted. Now I am at a turning point: All the teachings that I’ve asked for,
All I’ve received, are like a myth. My body has the appearance of a practitioner,
And I have a practitioner’s conceit; My mind can not fathom the true teachings.

Lacking even a trace of common Dharma, much less holy Dharma, The sixteen rules for ordinary social behavior Are just something that I’ve heard of. Seeing myself behave badly, I’m without shame;
Seen by others, I’m unembarassed; My bond to the teachings is short as a marmot’s tail.

Unable to practice properly true Dharma’s ten virtuous deeds, Harboring sectarian bias toward the one Buddha’s teachings, I slander the teachings and great beings A gather up bad karma.
Based on Dharma I carry a great weight of evil deeds. 
The more teaching I’ve received,

The more my vision of myself inflates, though intellectual analyses can not penetrate the deep meaning of the teachings. 
With conceit, I think, “I keep the Pratimoksha disciplines!”
But the four dharma practices have been lost without a trace. With conceit, I think, “I posses the precious Bodhisattva training!” But the Four Boundless Ones are just like pictures of a lamp.

With conceit, I think, “I keep the Secret Mantrayana samayas! But, not respecting the first root transgression, I become careless about all the rest. I can glibly explain the Four Thoughts That Turn the Mind to Dharma, But my attachment to phenomena Shows that my own mind has not truly changed.

Though I rely on a teacher, respect and devotion slowly ebb away; Instead of having pure perception,
I have wrong views, and see the guru as my equal. Love and respect toward my vajra friends weakens;
Unable to endure a few harsh words, I complain constantly.

Lacking thorough training in bodhicitta, the love and compassion that comes about From seeing all beings of the six realms as my parents Disappears like mist. 
Although I act as if I practice the paths of kyerim and dzogrim, I can not even cope with ordinary endless delusion. 
I recognize that the ultimate teaching of sutra and tantra Is emptiness, but can’t make use of that recognition;
My mindstream stays hard as horn. 
When I practice remaining in mind’s true condition i am without stability, yet I mouth off about the profound view and toss cause and effect to the winds.

On the outside—I can give a show of good behavior; On the inside— desire, attachment, greed rage like fire. 
Though my body remains in isolated mountain retreat, My mind wanders into town constantly, night and day. Without enjoying a real measure of certainty in myself, Thinking to act for other’s benefit is just a fairytale.


Although it is impossible that the Three Jewels betray me, Due to my weak devotion, I fear I will betray myself. Thus, although I am without the wrong view Of not believing in the teacher and the holy Dharma,
In these bad times we sentient beings are busily perfecting our bad karma, Knowing, heedlessly, falling under the sway of unawareness; Failing to maintain mindfulness, we suffer a great loss.

When I examine myself, I see that everything I’ve done has only added on to my confusion,
That all my thinking has been stained By the obscuring emotions and by grasping. Not seeing that even my virtuous acts are polluted with negativities Where else is there to end up but in the lower realms?
As for the way I behave and what I’ve done,

Bringing these to mind, I am sickened. Looking to others, I am only more discouraged;
There are no friends to benefit and ease my mind. 
If I can not take care of myself now,
Others can not give me refuge when hope is exhausted and I’m in the hands of the messengers of the Lord of Death. To wait for a rescue that can never come, Isn’t that self-deception?


Thus, with shame and remorse recognizing my own errors, Whatever offenses against Dharma have occurred,
Whatever samaya transgressions and violations, I won’t try to conceal from those with wisdom vision.

From the bottom of my heart, i confess; With your compassion, please endure me.

Be my refuge from the danger of the precipitous, errant path; Grant the deliverance of finding the perfect, liberating path. 
My whole life has been spent practicing this and practicing that
With nothing in my hands to show for it, No attainment. 
From now on, avoiding the miserable path of knowing much, and missing the one thing I need Why not go on the path of knowing the one thing that frees all?

Certain, unfailing hope, sole, supreme Lord upon whom I rely, Root guru who combines all refuges in one,
I supplicate you with devotion and one pointed mind; Supreme refuge, lord of greatest kindness,
Take hold of me with your compassion. Grant your blessing that I be able to see my own faults.

Grant your blessing I have no wish to see the faults of others. Grant your blessing evil, cruel,
and vicious thoughts be pacified. Grant your blessing wholesome thoughts arise deep from within.
Grant your blessing desire may lessen and contentment increase. Grant your blessing I remember the uncertainty of the time of death. Grant your blessing I be unconcerned at the time of death.
Grant your blessing I develop trust in Dharma. Grant your blessing I practice impartial pure perception.
Grant your blessing I develop unfabricated devotion and respect.

Grant your blessing I persevere, seeing that I have so little time left. Grant your blessing I be able to establish Dharma as my ultimate innermost goal. Grant your blessing I free my mindstream the innermost practice. Grant your blessing I have no obstacles to practice Grant your blessing the fruit of my practice may ripen quickly.

Grant your blessing all conduct with those with whom I have a karmic link may be meaningful.

Grant your blessing the duality of hope and fear be extinguished. Grant your blessing I see nondual wakefulness. Grant your blessing I recognize my own innate wakefulness. Grant your blessing I hold the dharmakaya citadel.


Grant your blessing I gain the great effortless certainty. By means of the great weapon, Indestructible primordial wakeful awareness, May the void life-force of samsara and nirvana Both be severed, at once.
Then, in the unending great bliss of Nyema’s feast may we always enjoy the activity
That is beyond joining and parting. In the pervasive space of evenness,

Even the word “suffering” does not exist— So who ought to be striving for happiness?
In the Kingdom of Samantabhadra Happiness and suffering are of one taste; Without grasping,
they liberate of themselves. May I attain Samantabhadra’s kingdom in this very life!



Colophon
This is a supplication, confession of faults, and an aspiration-prayer combined in one.
One night early in Water-Pig year (1983), my wisdom consort Rigdzin Wangmo had a dream in which appeared a female companion who had often appeared in her dreams. The girl said, “Now you should ask Rinpoche to write a supplication prayer.

Alright?” and left. Later, on the tenth of the waxing moon, she appeared again, saying, “Why haven’t you asked about the writing of that prayer?” That next morning, when we were discussing the dreams and the prayer, I said, “There are already plenty of supplication prayers, but not enough people who do them.” Rigdzin

Wangmo insisted, saying, “No matter whether it’s short or long, you must write this supplication.”
Then I thought, “These days there is danger from disease, war, and famine. In order to protect people from these dangers, I should write a prayer reminding the Compassionate Ones of their vows to help beings.” But although I was thinking of writing one, due to the distraction of many events, I didn’t have the chance.

Once again, on the evening of the 10th, the girl appeared, as before. She said in the dream, “Don’t neglect the prayer that I asked for before. There is a great need for it!” So, I thought to write it on the 15th of the same month. On the night of the 14th, I prayed with one-pointed mind to Guru Rinpoche, asking for his blessing in order to compose the prayer, making this aspiration, I went to sleep.

The next morning at dawn, in my own dream, I was at the head of a large hall like temple. Out of nowhere a young white man appeared in white clothes, with long hair spread out over his shoulders, holding a pair of cymbals. he rolled the cymbals, making a lovely sound, and danced toward me,

Spiraling closer and closer, in circles toward the right, dancing as do the Ging. He said: “If you want to establish the teachings, Make them firm in your mind. In the depths of mind, you will find Buddhahood. If you wish to visit Buddhafields, Purify ordinary deluded attachment.

The perfect, excellent Buddhafield is near at hand. Develop diligence to practice
The essence of the teachings. Without, who can gain the siddhi? It is hard to see one’s own faults.
So, pointing them out to oneself Is a crucial instruction. In the end, when faults are, one by one, removed
Enlightened qualities increase and shine forth.” at the end of this poem, he rolled the cymbals and then crashed them together, and I awoke. after I woke up, I did not forget what he had said, and I understood it to have been advice on practicing what to accept and what to reject.

I was regretful that, although I had actually seen the face of my only father guru, I had not recognized him. I, Jigdral Yeshe Dorje, old father of the Nyingmapa, wrote this from my own experience.
May it be of benefit. Sarvatha Mangalam.
"The changing cycle of joy and sorrow, like the changing seasons –
As a time of suffering will surely come around to me,
May I truly practice the sublime teachings."
- Dudjom Rinpoche

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Vasana
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Re: The little thread of big Self-Admonishments

Post by Vasana » Sat Oct 14, 2017 10:27 am

A reminder to myself ~ 16th Karmapa

With your supreme intelligence, you realized the intention
Of the unsurpassable vehicle, the tradition of Padmakara.
Guru of unequalled kindness, I remember you from my heart.
I supplicate you—bless me with your compassion.
I, Pema Trinley Palzang, a performer of three activities,
From now on, will take control of my own discipline in thought and deed.
I make a firm commitment, as follows,
To avoid thoughtlessness and senselessness.
In physical conduct, I will not allow myself to be rootless and hurried,
Incapable of being still, carelessly following my every whim.
I will always hold my own space
And be adorned by the training in pure discipline.
In speech, whether spiritual or secular,
I will choose meaningful words
And shun unconnected talk of past events or boring discussions
concerning any of the three times.
I will always exert myself in dharmic recitations, proclamations, and readings.
In mind, I will not flutter back and forth like a young bird on a branch.
Not getting absorbed in discursive thoughts of good and bad,
I will meditate, cultivating forbearance and relying on my own perceptions, not those of others. I will reflect on how best to benefit the teachings and beings.
In particular, the vital essence of the thought of all victorious ones
Is the true nature—the uncontrived, innate dharmakaya.
Without ever lapsing, I will sustain it with one taste in equipoise and post-meditation.
In sum, I will hold myself to the sublime, dharmic conduct of the three gates,
Not falling under the influence of others.
Arrogance, haughtiness, or thoughts of self-aggrandizement— whatever of these arises,
I will not let them move me in the slightest.
I will remain firm, dignified, and fearless, like a mountain.
Until this collection of elements has rotted away,
I will not waver from this way of being.
Of this way I will be a fearless warrior—that will be my quality.
This is my vow, like an image carved in stone. May it be virtuous!
Gods and protectors, work to help this come to pass!
May the virtuous signs of auspiciousness excellently blaze!


16th Karmapa quoted in the book "Heart Advice of the Karmapa"
"The changing cycle of joy and sorrow, like the changing seasons –
As a time of suffering will surely come around to me,
May I truly practice the sublime teachings."
- Dudjom Rinpoche

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Vasana
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Re: The little thread of big Self-Admonishments

Post by Vasana » Sat Oct 14, 2017 2:52 pm

HH Dalai Lama on our habitual tendency towards laziness and non-virtue, from Ethics for the New Millennium.

'We have a saying in Tibet that engaging in the practice of virtue is as hard as driving a donkey uphill, whereas engaging in destructive activities is as easy as rolling boulders downhill. It is also said that negative impulses arise as spontaneously as rain and gather momentum just like water following the course of gravity. What makes matters worse is our tendency to indulge negative thoughts and emotions even while agreeing that we should not. It is essential, therefore, to address directly our tendency to put things off and while away our time in meaningless activities and shrink from the challenge of transforming our habits on the grounds that it is too great a task.
[...]We must also recognize that the failure to act when it is clear that action is required may itself be a negative action….inaction is attributable less to negative thoughts and emotions as to a lack of compassion. It is thus important that we are no less determined to overcome our habitual tendency to laziness than we are to exercise restraint in response to afflictive emotion.'


HH Dalai Lama from How to See Yourself As You Really Are

'Laziness comes in many forms, all of which result in procrastination, putting off practice to another time. Sometimes laziness is a matter of being distracted from meditation by morally neutral activities, like sewing or considering how to drive from one place to another; this type of laziness can be especially pernicious because these thoughts and activities are not usually recognized as problems.

At other times, laziness manifests as distraction to thinking about nonvirtuous activities, such as an object of lust or how to pay an enemy back. Another type of laziness is the sense that you are inadequate to the task of meditation, feeling inferior and discouraged: “How could someone like me ever achieve this!” In this case you are failing to recognize the great potential of the human mind and the power of gradual training.

All of these forms of laziness involve being unenthusiastic about meditation. How can they be overcome? Contemplation of the advantages of attaining mental and physical flexibility will generate enthusiasm for meditation and counteract laziness. Once you have developed the meditative joy and bliss of mental and physical flexibility, you will be able to stay in meditation for as long as you want. At that time your mind will be completely trained so you can direct it to any virtuous activity; all dysfunctions of body and mind will have been cleared away.'
"The changing cycle of joy and sorrow, like the changing seasons –
As a time of suffering will surely come around to me,
May I truly practice the sublime teachings."
- Dudjom Rinpoche

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dzogchungpa
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Re: The little thread of big Self-Admonishments

Post by dzogchungpa » Sat Oct 14, 2017 4:33 pm

Also, Longchenpa's 30 pieces of advice seems to be a form of self-admonishment, at least in some of the translations. E.g., Guarisco's translation begins with:
By the power of my aspirations I was able to become a disciple in the supreme lineage of accomplishment; Yet I have spent my time uselessly, avoiding effort, and now this life is coming to its twilight. My intention was to behave like an ascetic, but now I am a distressed man and, seeing others like me, I have spoken these thirty words of advice to exhort my mind in the spirit of renunciation.
There are several translations available online you could include here.
If you focus on an object, you are not meditating. - Dudjom Rinpoche

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Vasana
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Re: The little thread of big Self-Admonishments

Post by Vasana » Sun Oct 15, 2017 2:05 pm

dzogchungpa wrote:
Sat Oct 14, 2017 4:33 pm
Also, Longchenpa's 30 pieces of advice seems to be a form of self-admonishment, at least in some of the translations. E.g., Guarisco's translation begins with:
By the power of my aspirations I was able to become a disciple in the supreme lineage of accomplishment; Yet I have spent my time uselessly, avoiding effort, and now this life is coming to its twilight. My intention was to behave like an ascetic, but now I am a distressed man and, seeing others like me, I have spoken these thirty words of advice to exhort my mind in the spirit of renunciation.
There are several translations available online you could include here.
Thanks, it's a great text*. I'm mostly looking for texts that are a bit more explicit in pointing out the authors' (and our own) faults and non-dharmic behaviours but texts that do this indirectly are also worthwhile. The 'indirect' admonishments have their time and place, but for me personally, they don't hit home as hard as the others if that makes sense.

* http://www.lotsawahouse.org/tibetan-mas ... -of-advice
"The changing cycle of joy and sorrow, like the changing seasons –
As a time of suffering will surely come around to me,
May I truly practice the sublime teachings."
- Dudjom Rinpoche

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tomschwarz
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Re: The little thread of big Self-Admonishments

Post by tomschwarz » Sun Oct 15, 2017 6:50 pm

Dear Longchen Rabjampa
The Precious Treasury of Pith Instructions
Cutting Through Fetters
Six pith instructions pertain to fetters thst bind you and must be cut through:
Because of your obsession with wealth and possessions, you are bound by the fetters of your attempts to increase and protect them.
Because of your obsession with your family line, you are bound by the fetters of chasing after success and fame
Because of your fixation on and attachment to distractions, you are bound by the fetters of busyness
Because of you fixation on the litral interpretation of conventional terms, you are bound by the fetters of pride.
Because of your obsession with meditative experiences and realization, you are bound by tge fetters of conciet.
Because of your obsession with spiritual practices, you are bound by the fetters of antidotes.
It would seem dificult to be a practitioner who is free of these fetters.
i dedicate this post to your happiness, the causes of your happiness, the absence of your suffering the causes of the absence of your suffering that we may not have too much attachment nor aversion. SAMAYAMANUPALAYA

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