is doing spell is ok in Buddhism?

General discussion, particularly exploring the Dharma in the modern world.
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Mantrik
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Re: is doing spell is ok in Buddhism?

Post by Mantrik » Fri Apr 13, 2018 7:26 pm

Ogyen wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 5:40 pm
Mantrik wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 5:33 pm
Ogyen wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 3:51 pm
I dunno ... From just a numbers standpoint... If I personally know over 12 people who have done this (including my own teacher) that I can count off the top of my head, either I am darn special statistically (which I doubt) or the numbers are more than "insignificant"...

I accept that a truly advanced master like ChNN can use Mandarava in that way, and accept his assessment that it has lengthened his life.

But......you know what's coming.........how does anyone else less advanced on the path know if it has lengthened their lives? Do they know when they were going to die? ;)
True... Good point. Some (with skill in this arena) can look at it astrologically and see when things come together in such a way that notes an expiration date, and it's interesting when that is corroborated independently by medical experts.

But to your point, most people won't have this ability or access to this knowledge. Or a way to verify that it's true in their case beyond opinions from assorted types of "experts" and their own intuition/communications from their own "unconscious mind"...
I wonder if Lama Dawa would have answered divination questions like: 'Barring accidental death due to the karma of others, when should I expect to die?'

Considering mantras and sadhanas as incantations intended to produce a result, like 'spells' I can think of those where the course of an illness has been changed or arrested, and that is of course measurable, but 'extended life' can't be measured until you die! :)
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Re: is doing spell is ok in Buddhism?

Post by Grigoris » Fri Apr 13, 2018 7:38 pm

Ogyen wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 3:51 pm
I dunno ... From just a numbers standpoint... If I personally know over 12 people who have done this (including my own teacher) that I can count off the top of my head, either I am darn special statistically (which I doubt) or the numbers are more than "insignificant"...
12 in 7.6 billion is pretty insignificant.

12,000 in 7.6 billion is also majorly insignificant.

12,000,000 in 7.6 billion (1.2%) is still insignificant.

Generally speaking, statistically significant means over 5% (ie it means that over 60,000,000 people have pulled it off).
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
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Re: is doing spell is ok in Buddhism?

Post by Ogyen » Fri Apr 13, 2018 7:40 pm

I like to look at the linguistic definitions of words. Because words have meanings. :twothumbsup:

One of the definitions of "Spell" is screen-captured here.

1. a form of words used as a magical charm or incantation.
3. an ability to control or influence people as though one had magical power over them.

AS THOUGH = seemingly, not for real. From the perspective of ignorance, a lot of things seem like magic. From a perspective of knowledge, magic is finely understood causality (opinion=mine)
Spell Definition Screen Capture.PNG
Spell Definition Screen Capture.PNG (36.22 KiB) Viewed 320 times
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"To love. To be loved. To never forget your own insignificance. To never get used to the unspeakable violence and the vulgar disparity of life around you. To seek joy in the saddest places. To pursue beauty to its lair. To never simplify what is complicated or complicate what is simple. To respect strength, never power. Above all, to watch. To try and understand. To never look away. And never, never, to forget." –Arundhati Roy

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Re: is doing spell is ok in Buddhism?

Post by Ogyen » Fri Apr 13, 2018 7:44 pm

Grigoris wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 7:38 pm
Ogyen wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 3:51 pm
I dunno ... From just a numbers standpoint... If I personally know over 12 people who have done this (including my own teacher) that I can count off the top of my head, either I am darn special statistically (which I doubt) or the numbers are more than "insignificant"...
12 in 7.6 billion is pretty insignificant.

12,000 in 7.6 billion is also majorly insignificant.

12,000,000 in 7.6 billion (1.2%) is still insignificant.

Generally speaking, statistically significant means over 5% (ie it means that over 60,000,000 people have pulled it off).
I don't know 7.6 billion people. I know maybe 50ish people who have had a prognosis of illness that is life-threatening. Over 12 is not insignificant in my experiential pool. I'm not taking myself as an empirical data piece. I'm taking myself as an ordinary example with an ordinary (insignificantly important) life, and an ordinary amount of social interaction... family, friends, co-workers, etc. Regular stuff.

12 in 50 is alright. :twothumbsup: Gives me hope. Theoretically we can imagine anything we want. Experientially ...this is my experience, and what reality reveals itself to be as I encounter it.

I am speculating if I am kind of an average social cog in the wheel, there are at least others who have known the same as I. Maybe it's a jump, but it's safe to assume that I have a very ordinary social position like millions of others.

My acupuncturist has some very interesting numbers and she treats hundreds, maybe has treated thousands of people in her decades long career.

I've studied statistics at a university level, and am aware of how variations changed based on the criteria set from the outset. No need to go there right now because this is all speculative, and also the reason why I'm speaking only from an experiential/perceptual standpoint, because it's what I CAN base what I have learned to be true. It's not meant to be taken as truth. It's meant to be shared as my own experience.
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The Heart Drive - nosce te ipsum

"To love. To be loved. To never forget your own insignificance. To never get used to the unspeakable violence and the vulgar disparity of life around you. To seek joy in the saddest places. To pursue beauty to its lair. To never simplify what is complicated or complicate what is simple. To respect strength, never power. Above all, to watch. To try and understand. To never look away. And never, never, to forget." –Arundhati Roy

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Re: is doing spell is ok in Buddhism?

Post by Mantrik » Fri Apr 13, 2018 7:56 pm

Ogyen wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 7:40 pm
I like to look at the linguistic definitions of words. Because words have meanings. :twothumbsup:

One of the definitions of "Spell" is screen-captured here.

1. a form of words used as a magical charm or incantation.
3. an ability to control or influence people as though one had magical power over them.

AS THOUGH = seemingly, not for real. From the perspective of ignorance, a lot of things seem like magic. From a perspective of knowledge, magic is finely understood causality (opinion=mine)

Spell Definition Screen Capture.PNG
Yes, I'm talking about mantras and sadhanas and using 'spells' to avoid Greg walloping me for being off topic. lol :)

I think the second definition is vague, as spells may call upon the power of other beings and direct them towards those targeted, rather than necessarily assuming a personal power.

But if there is a belief that, say, a Garuda practice will heal, and that practice is used....is it not a 'charm' in the old-fashioned sense? And isn't that exaclty how huge numbers of Buddhists think of their practices, prayers, offerings at temples, requests for protection etc etc. ? I'm not asserting that it is correct, just that sometimes a spade is a spade, a charm is a charm and a spell is a spell. :)
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Micchāmi Dukkaḍaṃ (मिच्छामि दुक्कडम्)

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Re: is doing spell is ok in Buddhism?

Post by Grigoris » Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:18 pm

Ogyen wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 7:44 pm
I don't know 7.6 billion people. I know maybe 50ish people who have had a prognosis of illness that is life-threatening. Over 12 is not insignificant in my experiential pool. I'm not taking myself as an empirical data piece. I'm taking myself as an ordinary example with an ordinary (insignificantly important) life, and an ordinary amount of social interaction... family, friends, co-workers, etc. Regular stuff.

12 in 50 is alright. :twothumbsup: Gives me hope. Theoretically we can imagine anything we want. Experientially ...this is my experience, and what reality reveals itself to be as I encounter it.

I am speculating if I am kind of an average social cog in the wheel, there are at least others who have known the same as I. Maybe it's a jump, but it's safe to assume that I have a very ordinary social position like millions of others.

My acupuncturist has some very interesting numbers and she treats hundreds, maybe has treated thousands of people in her decades long career.

I've studied statistics at a university level, and am aware of how variations changed based on the criteria set from the outset. No need to go there right now because this is all speculative, and also the reason why I'm speaking only from an experiential/perceptual standpoint, because it's what I CAN base what I have learned to be true. It's not meant to be taken as truth. It's meant to be shared as my own experience.
And this is the pitfall of anecdotal evidence.

Comparatively: Smallpox vaccine campaigns, starting in 1967, completely eradicated the disease and saved billions of lives.
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde

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Re: is doing spell is ok in Buddhism?

Post by Grigoris » Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:24 pm

Varis wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:50 am
I would recommend reading Liao-Fan's Four Lessons, you might change your mind.
I will. Thank you.
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde

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Re: is doing spell is ok in Buddhism?

Post by Grigoris » Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:32 pm

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .nymo.html
5. "Here, student, some woman or man is a killer of living beings, murderous, bloody-handed, given to blows and violence, merciless to living beings. Due to having performed and completed such kammas, on the dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a state of deprivation, in an unhappy destination, in perdition, in hell. If, on the dissolution of the body, after death, instead of his reappearing in a state of deprivation, in an unhappy destination, in perdition, in hell, he comes to the human state, he is short-lived wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to short life, that is to say, to be a killer of living beings, murderous, bloody-handed, given to blows and violence, merciless to living beings.
"My religion is not deceiving myself."
Jetsun Milarepa 1052-1135 CE

"Butchers, prostitutes, those guilty of the five most heinous crimes, outcasts, the underprivileged: all are utterly the substance of existence and nothing other than total bliss."
The Supreme Source - The Kunjed Gyalpo
The Fundamental Tantra of Dzogchen Semde

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Re: is doing spell is ok in Buddhism?

Post by Ogyen » Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:06 pm

Grigoris wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:18 pm
Ogyen wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 7:44 pm
I don't know 7.6 billion people. I know maybe 50ish people who have had a prognosis of illness that is life-threatening. Over 12 is not insignificant in my experiential pool. I'm not taking myself as an empirical data piece. I'm taking myself as an ordinary example with an ordinary (insignificantly important) life, and an ordinary amount of social interaction... family, friends, co-workers, etc. Regular stuff.

12 in 50 is alright. :twothumbsup: Gives me hope. Theoretically we can imagine anything we want. Experientially ...this is my experience, and what reality reveals itself to be as I encounter it.

I am speculating if I am kind of an average social cog in the wheel, there are at least others who have known the same as I. Maybe it's a jump, but it's safe to assume that I have a very ordinary social position like millions of others.

My acupuncturist has some very interesting numbers and she treats hundreds, maybe has treated thousands of people in her decades long career.

I've studied statistics at a university level, and am aware of how variations changed based on the criteria set from the outset. No need to go there right now because this is all speculative, and also the reason why I'm speaking only from an experiential/perceptual standpoint, because it's what I CAN base what I have learned to be true. It's not meant to be taken as truth. It's meant to be shared as my own experience.
And this is the pitfall of anecdotal evidence.

Comparatively: Smallpox vaccine campaigns, starting in 1967, completely eradicated the disease and saved billions of lives.
The OP's question doesn't require empirical evidence, as it seems stemmed in an emotional question. Even with all the sutras of the world, it's a personal question about a personal choice. Anecdotal evidence seems permissible to me where it's an opinion based decision. Staying with the spirit of the OP's question, I chose to go a more anecdotal route. No matter what anyone says here, as I put in my first reply, it's going to be his choice, his decision, his karma.

You will get absolutely zero argument from me on the effectiveness of vaccines. They have saved billions of lives. I am not a proponent of mantra over medicine. A tool's form generally has a utility specific to its function. Different forms, different functions. I could choose my breakfast based on the empirical evidence around my choice of cornflakes, and that would be fine... but there is a lot of evidence that shows that even with all the "information" most humans choose on criteria as simple as a feeling.

:rules: Rules are made up conventions with varying degrees of consequences. As far as I can tell...the reduction is that there are only decisions and consequences. The rest is attributed. Right. Wrong. Moral. Immoral. In line- out of line. etc.

I'll stop here. :smile:
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The Heart Drive - nosce te ipsum

"To love. To be loved. To never forget your own insignificance. To never get used to the unspeakable violence and the vulgar disparity of life around you. To seek joy in the saddest places. To pursue beauty to its lair. To never simplify what is complicated or complicate what is simple. To respect strength, never power. Above all, to watch. To try and understand. To never look away. And never, never, to forget." –Arundhati Roy

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Re: is doing spell is ok in Buddhism?

Post by Quay » Fri Apr 13, 2018 11:20 pm

DiamondMeru wrote:
Wed Apr 11, 2018 5:05 pm
There is a lot of fear on this website, as a Wiccan who is trying to practice Buddhism, I am sad to say that magic gets a bad rap because so many people have been taught that it is evil or causes bad karma. Honestly, I have had some really bad consequences from protection spells, but I have also seen the true Dukka of Samasara from these consequences and it has led me here to Buddhism. Perhaps not all mishaps are evil or corrupting but a guide to truth. Power gone wrong can be devastating for the practitioner and others around them so I see how spells when not used with absolute good intention can be damaging. So I believe healing, exorcism, and purification to be good magic but all else if done for ego can be taking from others therefore creating bad karma.
Just beware and really study magic and Buddhism before you take a leap that could be damaging.
Peace and love,
A solitary Wiccan Buddhist or pseudo Buddhist :rolleye:
Thank you for this post. I really appreciate it. The level of ignorance about magic, earth wisdom, working with the elements, etc., on this forum is vast and apparently not subject to correction. Though in all fairness, there is no reason anyone here would know much about it.

In Vajrayana Buddhism in general and the Nyingma school in particular there are oceans of practices and methods of dealing with conventional reality that are mirror images of many Wiccan and earth magic practices. That is because conventionally speaking the elements are governed by natural laws and a person sensitive to that can use them to their and others advantage. Again, motivation is absolutely key. Magic in the service of others, especially healing and insight, may be very virtuous.

And there are countless stories from Tibet, especially from places like Repkong, that show the magic tradition was not only a part of the practice of Buddhism but also it was used as a defense against Maras that wished to suppress or corrupt it all.
"Knowledge is as infinite as the stars in the sky;
There is no end to all the subjects one could study.
It is better to grasp straight away their very essence--
The unchanging fortress of the Dharmakaya."

– Longchenpa.

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Re: is doing spell is ok in Buddhism?

Post by TharpaChodron » Sat Apr 14, 2018 3:22 pm

Financial problems seem hard to solve through spells. They are a result of many causes and conditions which can't necessarily be undone overnight, unless your spell is to win the lottery or for your debts to be magically absolved.

There's rarely an easy way out of money issues. You can strive to get a better paying job, and/or spend less money (budgeting).

Did someone mention Orgyen Dzambala practice?

I don't see a lot of ignorance and fear in regards to wiccan stuff on here. It does seem more of a distraction, maybe an obstacle to healthy Buddhist practice though. Praying for and wishing for things to magically happen is taking a very different approach relating to life than the Buddhist way, imo. Plus, we have our own ways to ask for assistance, but specifically done in the context of Dharma so...

Anyways, let us know how that money spell works for you. Good luck! :)

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Re: is doing spell is ok in Buddhism?

Post by pemachophel » Sat Apr 14, 2018 5:15 pm

Below is the Mahayana scripture titled the "108 Names of Jambhala." It can be found in the gZungs 'Dus (Compendium of Dharanis) in the Kangyur. It was translated by Erick Tsikonoplous with some editing on my part for my own use. The more times you recite it, the more effective it will be. I recommend trying to say it at least once a day. You can start each time with the words, "I prostrate to..." This practice doesn't require oral transmission, although it would be good if you could get it. Even just forming the wish that you would like to get oral transmission for some day would help enhance it's effectiveness. Also, be sure to dedicate the merit of reciting this for the benefit and ease of all sentient beings. "Benefit" here means worldly benefit and "ease" means the supra-mundane ease due to practicing the Dharma. Good luck & best wishes.

The 108 Names of Jambhala

Gya-gar ked-du: Arya Jambhala Nama Ashtashataka
Bod ked-du: Phag-pa Nod-dzin-gyi-tshen Gya-tsa-gyed-pa Zhe-ja-wa
 
I prostrate to Arya Jambhala.
 
[The Yaksha asked Vajrapani, the Lord of Secrets:]
 
“Now then, the Yaksha Who lives in isolated places, the One finely adorned with gold, the One utterly beautified by precious gems, the One as [brilliant] as an intensely burning fire is active in the Braided Realm. However, deeply saluting the two honored feet of the Lord of Secrets, the holder of the vajra, I ask something which arose during deep meditative absorption:
 
“[O] Bhagawat, sovereign master of [Yakshas], keepers from harm, lord over all collections of secret mantra, [You Who] are revered by all the retainers of vidya mantras, [You Who] are bowed down to by Devas and Asuras, striver in taming the ferocious, [He Who] is endowed with the good qualities of a Bodhisatva, protector Who facilitates the benefit of all sentient beings, retainer of the secrets of all the Buddhas, because I wish to help sentient beings with a mind compelled by compassion, for the sake of truly complete Enlightenment, I too generate Bodhicitta. And yet, when I see those persons whose wealth is scarce and those whose merit is feeble, I am distressed by intense sorrow, [O] Lord of Secrets.”
 
The Yaksha spoke these words and the Blessed One, the secret Lord of Secrets, overpowered with compassion, spoke the following:
 
“Listen well to the Secret One. The 108 names of [Jambhala], the Protecting One, the glorious Protector from detriment, [He Who] benefits all sentient beings, the eliminator of the affliction of poverty, the ruler of all wealth, are imbued with merit, dispel the faults and destructiveness of poverty, and were spoken of by supreme Victors as numerous as grains of sand in the river Ganges. When the Buddha Surya spoke and taught the Dharma in the field known as 100 Beams of Light, I also intensely listened to that which dispels poverty and is imbued with merit, and it is this which, through My wisdom, to you, O striver for the benefit of all sentient beings, I shall teach well. [Thus] you should concentrate and listen carefully.

“Arya Guru of Devas and Asuras,
One with Wisdom, One Reverent Toward the Dharma,
Embodiment of Compassion and Love, Stably Patient One,
One of Peaceful Faculties, One of Controlled Faculties,
Defeater of Evil with Virtue, Friendly One,
Gentle Accomplisher of All Aims,
Harmless One, Undeceiving One of Glory,
Lord of Treasuries, One Unconquerable by Others,
Sole Refuge of the Three Jewels,
One Beheld by All the Buddhas,
Protector of Treasures, Majestic One,
Continuously Giving One, Increaser of Wealth,
Source of Precious Things, Trainer of Living Beings,
Lord of Water, Bringer of Water,
Embodiment of Yakshas Who Enjoy Water,
One Who Teaches Those Who Seek Treasures,
Mightiest Mountain of Gold,
One Who Frees from the Pain of Suffering,
Powerful One, Intensely Powerful One, Protector of Beings,
Ruler of Water, Cloud-colored One,
Eye of the World, La of the World,
Sun, Moon, Enduring One,
Great King Mahadana,
One with Mongoose Abiding in Hand,
Youthful Lion, Paramount One,
Great Yaksha, One of Great Magical Power,
Master of Words, One of Smiling Countenance,
One Who Speaks Straightforwardly and Pleasantly,
Hook of Desire of the Brahmins,
Great One Who Accomplishes Benefit, One Who Is Worshiped Due to Accomplishing,
Retainer of Vidya Mantras, One Who Rules with a Magical Wheel,
Kubera, Rider of Humans,
One with a Vase-like Belly, Broad-eyed One,
One with the Scent of the Gods, One Swift as Mind,
Pervasive Lord Who is the Source of Happiness, Son of Manibhadra,
One Who Rejoices in Protecting Sentient Beings,
Form that Manifests All Desires and Needs, God of Mind,
Bearer of a Crown, Delighter of Families,
One with a Crown on the Left Side, One with Pearl in Hand,
Hundred-handed One, Mighty One,
Master of the Eighth Bhumi, Heavenly One,
One with a Face the Color of the Full Moon,
Leader of the Hosts of Captains,
Stable Guardian, Merchant, One of Good Fortune,
Wish-fulfilling Jewel, Efficacious Vase,
Magical Wish[-fulfilling] Tree, Manager of Humans,
One Worthy of Offering’s Purpose, Chief,
Supreme Giver, Dwarf, He Who Penetrates Pervasively,
One Worthy of Refuge, Guardian of Auspiciousness,
One Well-adorned with Garlands of Precious Things,
One Abiding on a Divine Lion Throne,
Glorious Lord of Bodhisatvas,
Utmost Increaser, One of Inexhaustible Wealth,
One Imbued with the Skillful Power of Lion[-like] Strength,
Teacher Victorious Over the Three Worlds,
Leader of Merchants, Supreme One of the Family,
Epicenter of the Lotus, Undefeatable Victor,
And Great Ocean of Godly Pure Conduct.

“These 108 names that I have conveyed [to you] of [Jambhala, He Who is] the greatness of the very embodiment of protection from detriment, act to subdue all negativity. [They] clear away the disturbance of poverty [and] are the generator of abundance and good fortune. [They] increase cattle, horses, and wealth and eradicate [the influence of] negative planets, stars, constellations, dreams, and bad omens.

Thus, whether in forests or, perchance, a village, a hermitage, or else a mountain too, wherever the adept reads [these names], there, battles, enemies, and depression, snakes, fire, water, and the hosts of bandits and thieves, tigers, bears, and great fears, oceans which are difficult or excruciating to traverse, and humans shall come to be powerfully pacified. Lords of fire, Gods of water, Lords of death, Lords of demons, Gods of wind, wealth-giving Gods, the glorious Kubera, the sons of Manibhadra, and the Yaksha General Five Games, the pinnacle Yakshas, Yakshas of remote places, and other Gods and Yakshas, too, will, without distraction, day and night, serve to protect [you] with intense joy. 

Wherever this is read, elephants, horses, cattle, various kinds of crops, as well as fruit and flowers shall increase. Human disease, epidemics, and all those things which give rise to harm will all be transformed into happiness and goodness and, in particular, there will be auspiciousness for children. For those who [read these names], Pretas, Nagas, elementals, Mamos, wrathful evil spirits, Dakinis, Kimnaras, and even Rakshasas will do no harm. They will be freed from disease in its entirety and likewise will be happy and endowed with wealth. [They will be] prosperous with children, relatives, glory, and charity. They will be born in an excellent royal family. [They will] be born amidst great resources. [They will] have long life and resplendence and be without disease and far from plagues. In all their lives, they will remember their births, be quick learners, and retain what they have heard. [They will] be imbued with the qualities of a Bodhisatva and become good fortune itself.”

[Then the Yaksha said:]
 
“Homage! Homage! Yaksha Lord! Lord of Secrets, I pay homage to You Who strives in taming the ferocious. Vajrapani, I bow to You. [Jambhala,] He Who is delightful and gentle in order to inspire sentient beings, the renowned son of Manibhadra, pacifies the disease of poverty. This excellent discourse has thus been well spoken.”

[Then Vajrapani said:]
 
“A sublime accomplisher of aims, a secret mantra, I also offer here. Through merely recollecting it, humans shall be liberated from poverty. One will not be harmed by others and they will be protected. Enemies too will not overpower them. They will have good fortune and opportunity and shall live to 100. Assuredly they will quickly obtain even the precious divine elephant and all those [other] things worthy of sovereigns and sovereignty. Thus there is no doubt about the power of dominion as well.

“NA-MO RAT-NA TRA-YA-YA
NA-MO MA-NI-BHA-DRA-YA
MA-HA YAK-SHA SE-NA-PA-TA-YE
OM HRING TRANG
KSHA DZRING HRING HANG DI-BYA RAT-NOU GA-PA-RI-SHA-NA
A-TA-BA-KA
DE-WA YAK-SHA SA-MA-YA MA-NU-SMA-RA
HRIH HUNG PHET SO-HA”

[Thus] the 108 names of Arya Jambhala are completed.
Pema Chophel པདྨ་ཆོས་འཕེལ

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